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The Rwandan family facing survival: the psychiatric repercussions of the war

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... Studies looking at the indirect consequences of war have also received attention. A good number have examined the short and medium-term impacts of traumatic experiences of war on psychological outcomes, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety (Babic-Banaszak et al 2002;Butera, Bultinck and Mercier 1999;Farhood et al. 1993;Mollica et al. 1993;Momartin et al. 2003). The impact of war on health infrastructures (Cliff and Noormahomed 1993;Ityavyar and Ogba 1989;Murray et al. 2002), fertility outcomes (Agadjanian and Prata 2002;Blanc 2004), marriage (Laliberte, Laplant and Piche 2003) and disability (Ghobarah, Huth and Russett 2004) are also topics that have received recent attention. ...
... 1 Studies of the indirect consequences of war have examined the short-and mediumterm impacts of traumatic experiences on psychological outcomes, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety (Babic-Banaszak et al. 2002;Butera, Bultinck, and Mercier 1999;Farhood et al. 1993;Mollica et al. 1993;Momartin et al. 2003). Recent attention has also been given to the impact of war on health infrastructures (Cliff and Noormahomed 1993;Ityavyar and Ogba 1989;Murray et al. 2002), fertility outcomes (Agadjanian and Prata 2002;Blanc 2004), marriage (Laliberté, Laplante, and Piché 2003), and disability (Ghobarah, Huth, and Russett 2004). ...
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