BookPDF Available

Beer in Africa. Drinking spaces, states and selves

Authors:

Abstract

http://books.google.be/books/about/Beer_in_Africa.html?id=-jqRkS-3fRQC&redir_esc=y
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Men's daily rounds were often measured by beer, and their relations with others were often mediated by it (cf. Bryceson 2002;van Wolputte and Fumanti 2010). On the flip side, to the extent that they wanted to convey conventional respectability, many women studiously avoided any association with beer or the places where it was consumed (Scarnecchia 1999). ...
... Whereas pioneering medical and psychological studies mostly sought to demonstrate the pathological or negative effects of alcoholic beverages on consumers, the sociologically minded researchers who came later to the topic have shifted the focus of attention, seeking to highlight the sociability and institutions that drinking engenders Lentz, 1999a;Akyeampong, 1996b). In Africa, scholars have explored a myriad of alcoholic beverages peasants have been producing; these drinks are made either from grains or root trees to aid agricultural production or they mark ritual and celebratory occasions such as funerals, puberty and other initiation rites, weddings etc. (Akyeampong, 1996a;Colson & Scudder, 1988;Lentz, 1999b;Saul, 1981;Von Wolputte & Fumanti, 2010). Such studies have shed considerable light on artisanal brewing and its ritual implications and how the resulting cultural expressions shape interpersonal and social relations across time and space (Hagaman, 1977;Luning, 2002). ...
Full-text available
Article
This paper examines the spread of consumption and commercial brewing of pito (sorghum beer) from its production base in the northern savanna region of Ghana to the southern transition zone in Brong Ahafo and the resulting drinking culture. It draws on fieldwork conducted in Brong Ahafo and northern Ghana to discuss the connections among rural migration, ecological and economic changes and how these affect consumption patterns in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana. Focusing on the vibrant drinking activities of two pito bars, it shows that when viewed through the lens of political economy and contemporary Ghanaian history, the spread of consumption of pito can provide a window into social transformation and the construction of inter-ethnic relations and identities while speaking simultaneously to an emerging northern Ghanaian middle class
... In traditional Nigerian society, alcohol consumption was gender and age based. As noted earlier, it was mainly consumed by adult males in social engagements and customs and tradition regulated production and consumption of locally made alcoholic drinks (Heap, 1998; van Wolputte & Fumanti, 2010). Though young people in a few communities were permitted to drink, this was usually in the presence of adults who monitored the quantity they consumed (Obot, 2000). ...
Full-text available
Article
Alcohol consumption among different ethnic groups in Nigeria has a long history, especially among those groups where it was not forbidden by religion. In the traditional era, alcohol played complex roles in the socio-cultural relationships of different communities. It was used for rituals, marriage ceremonies, chieftaincy enthronements, etc. It was mainly consumed by male adults for pleasure while females and youths were culturally restrained from drinking. Excess consumption was not a norm and intoxication attracted negative sanctions. In the contemporary Nigerian society, patterns of consumption are changing rapidly following the socio-political and economic development of Nigeria, giving rise to new norms of alcohol use. This review examines the influence of disintegration of traditional values, non-regulation, advertising and other factors on these changing patterns of alcohol consumption. It concludes by exploring the consequences of these changing patterns, and suggested some remedies for contemporary Nigerian society.
Full-text available
Article
El artículo analiza los efectos de la caída de los precios de la goma de opio en las economías indígenas y campesinas de la región de La Montaña de Guerrero a partir de una serie de hallazgos etnográficos. Se recurre al concepto de memoria social para afirmar que la vida económica, pero también ritual y cultural, de las comunidades que se dedican a la producción de los cultivos ilícitos está íntimamente asociada a las dinámicas del mercado internacional de drogas. En ese sentido, la depreciación de la goma de opio tiene consecuencias en la reproducción social de las poblaciones indígenas que se dedican a dicha actividad ilícita.
Article
Excessive alcohol consumption often appears as an issue of great concern for the friends and family members of drinkers in Uganda, where per capita consumption rates among drinkers are among the highest in the world. In many cases, these families seek care for their loved ones in small shops run by herbalists, in the shrines of spirit mediums, in the pews of churches, or in one of several newly established inpatient rehabilitation centres. Yet, acts of intervention come not only from living family members or friends, but also from an array of spiritual beings who may arrive uninvited and outside intentional therapeutic contexts. In this article, we consider a case in which a mother's spirit intervenes in the life of her son, first by possessing his body and then by continuing to dwell there in ways that make it impossible for him to drink. This case highlights the importance of forces experienced as non-self in life-transforming processes, and demands that we give attention to a moment in a person's life when the work of care is achieved through an act of physical force.
Article
This re-evaluation of existing data on board games from the Near Eastern Bronze Age demonstrates their function as social lubricants in cross- cultural interaction. Board games are situated theoretically as liminoid practices, which lie outside the bounds of normative social behaviour and allow for interaction across social boundaries. Utilizing double-sided game boards, with an indigenous game on one side and a newly introduced game on the other, the games of senet, mehen and twenty squares provide evidence for social interactions. Cypriots had adopted Egyptian mehen and senet by the third millennium BC, and indigenized the games. This lies in contrast to the game of twenty squares, which had a particular role among elites in the Late Bronze Age interaction sphere. This anthropological discussion of evidence relating to gaming seeks to inspire further research on the role of board games in society.
Full-text available
Article
Health geography has emerged from under the “shadow of the medical” to become one of the most vibrant of all the subdisciplines. Yet, this success has also meant that health research has become increasingly siloed within this subdisciplinary domain. As this article explores, this represents a potential lost opportunity with regard to the study of global health, which has instead come to be dominated by anthropology and political science. Chief among the former’s concerns are exploring the gap between the programmatic intentions of global health and the unintended or unanticipated consequences of their deployment. This article asserts that recent work on contingency within geography offers significant conceptual potential for examining this gap. It therefore uses the example of alcohol taxation in Botswana, an emergent global health target and tool, to explore how geographical contingency and the emergent, contingent geographies that result might help counter the prevailing tendency for geography to be sidestepped within critical studies of global health. At the very least, then, this intervention aims to encourage reflection by geographers on how to make explicit the all-too-often implicit links between their research and global health debates located outside the discipline.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.