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Contextually appropriate aquatic programming in Canada's North: The Shallow Water Pool Lifeguard Certification

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Despite its forty-four year long existence, the Northwest Territories (NWT) Aquatic Program has struggled to train and retain northern lifeguards. As a result, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association and the Lifesaving Society of Canada designed the Shallow Water Pool Lifeguard certification to try to more successfully certify lifeguards in the North, a region that has mostly shallow water swimming pools. A week-long training course was piloted in 2007 to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach to lifeguard training. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with course candidates and instructors revealed that the course's foci on northern cultural practices and shallow swimming pools were appropriate and made the content both meaningful and effective in preparing candidates for work at their community pools. The course candidates, all of whom were Aboriginal youth, noted the importance of the continued incorporation and expansion of culturally responsive water safety education strategies as well as a need for a more effective, wider-reaching territorial aquatic program. Specifically, course content should incorporate Aboriginal beliefs and traditions as well as information pertaining to local waterways.
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... In some instances, Indigenous community members aided the researchers in the data analysis process (Table 2). These community members included Indigenous researchers, members of the CAB, and focus group participants (Bell et al., 2014;de Finney et al., 2013;Giles & Rich, 2013;Katz et al., 2011;Kelley et al., 2019;Momper et al., 2017;Naidu et al., 2014;Pigford et al., 2012;Richmond & Smith, 2012;Smillie-Adjarkwa et al., 2013). Using the expertise of these community members, transcripts were verified for accuracy in both content and cultural context (Giles & Rich, 2013;Momper et al., 2017;Pigford et al., 2012). ...
... These community members included Indigenous researchers, members of the CAB, and focus group participants (Bell et al., 2014;de Finney et al., 2013;Giles & Rich, 2013;Katz et al., 2011;Kelley et al., 2019;Momper et al., 2017;Naidu et al., 2014;Pigford et al., 2012;Richmond & Smith, 2012;Smillie-Adjarkwa et al., 2013). Using the expertise of these community members, transcripts were verified for accuracy in both content and cultural context (Giles & Rich, 2013;Momper et al., 2017;Pigford et al., 2012). Furthermore, community members had the opportunity to identify information in the transcripts that should be kept confidential (Perry & Hoffman, 2010;Pigford et al., 2012). ...
... This result is likely an underestimate, as authors may have included community members as authors without explicitly stating this in the text. There were some cases in which the communities preferred not to be named or preferred to have community identifiers removed from research articles or other forms of public dissemination of data (Giles & Rich, 2013). This provision allowed for communities to protect their identity, which was especially important when sensitive topics (e.g., alcohol and drug abuse among youth) were discussed. ...
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