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Customers' relational models as determinants of customer engagement value

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Abstract

Purpose – The authors apply Alan P. Fiske's relational models framework to customers' engagement with service firms – specifically, they propose that customers who hold different relational models for the service firm are likely to engage with the firm in dissimilar ways, thus generating different types of customer engagement value for the firm. Fiske's relational models framework is eminently suitable for studying customer-service firm engagement because it is widely adopted in the social sciences as a rigorously developed framework for conceptualizing social interactions. Design/methodology/approach – The article bridges Fiske's relational models framework and Kumar et al. 's customer engagement value framework, and conceptually demonstrates that customers employing different relational models for the service firm are likely to generate different types of customer engagement value for the firm. Findings – The article demonstrates conceptually that customers' relational models, schemata, and scripts influence how consumers engage with the firm and the type of customer engagement value accruing to the firm. Research limitations/implications – This research has implications for service firms' relationship strategies. First, service marketers can determine the desired customer engagement value(s) and then craft their customer relationship strategy so that it maximizes those engagement value(s). The article suggests relationship strategies that service firms may implement for encouraging customers to adopt different relational models. Originality/value – No research has bridged relational models theories and customer engagement value theories.
... In this regard, some studies have considered customer experience as a predictor of customer engagement (Bowden, 2009;Mohd-Ramly & Omar, 2017;Rather, 2020), while others have treated experience as a dimension of customer engagement (D. Kaltcheva et al., 2014) or an outcome of customer engagement (Vivek et al., 2012). Therefore, the relationship between customer experience and customer engagement is still unclear in literature. ...
... This means that customers decide on the value of the service (not the value of the company) as the beneficiary (Vargo & Lusch, 2008). In this regard, Kumar et al. (2010) define customer engagement as the value that customers create for the company by interacting with other customers, or sharing their knowledge with the company (Pansari & Kumar, 2017) and placed a greater emphasis on the value of customer lifetime value, customer influence value, customer referral value and customer knowledge value as dimensions of the customer engagement value (D. Kaltcheva et al., 2014;Wu et al., 2018). While previous research has often applied the servicedominant logic for customer engagement, the social exchange theory also contributes to the development of knowledge in this field. ...
... The relationship marketing places a premium on customer behaviors originating from positive experiences (Leclercq et al., 2017) as well as enjoyable experience that foster customer engagement (Calder et al., 2013). Some studies have described experience as a dimension of customer engagement (D. Kaltcheva et al., 2014), but others have defined it as a variable of customer engagement (Rather, 2020); however, Most studies have also revealed that customer engagement stems from a positive interactive experience between customers and their engagement (Zhang et al., 2017). In the same vein, Kumar et al. (2010) argue the values created by customer engagement for service companies embrace customer lifetime value, customer referral value, customer influence value, and customer knowledge value (D. ...
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The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of customer experience in the relationship between Servicescape and the customer engagement value in the hospitality industry. A total of 700 loyal customers of five-star hotels in Northwest of Iran were selected for the study after completing a questionnaire. The research hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling and the AMOS 24 software. Results revealed that substance and Communicative Staging had a positive effect on customer experience. Also, the customer experience effect on all three dimensions of customer engagement value (lifetime value, influence value and customer knowledge value).
... Based on SET, resources flow through a process of reciprocity (Gergen 1969;Gouldner 1960). Positive initiating actions tend to cause positive reciprocating responses and/or fewer negative reciprocating responses (Kaltcheva et al. 2014;Lee et al. 2014;Tran et al. 2022, pp. 346-347). ...
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Owing to a significant decline in consumer trust, the power of arousing affective commitment to brands through perceived brand ethicality and corporate social responsibility (CSR) has now become an advantageous marketing strategy; however, there is little known whether cynics and materialists show similar responses toward such marketing efforts. This study analyzes the mediating effect of consumers’ perceived ethicality in the relationship between consumer cynicism/material values and affective commitment by comparing the perception of CSR efforts as weak or strong in the context of cosmetics brands among young women. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) approach was utilized to test the data related to 271 participants obtained by purposive, convenient, and snowball sampling methods. The results reveal that cynicism has a serious negative effect on perceived ethicality that mediates affective commitment, whereas, materialism has a relatively stronger positive impact on perceived ethicality that triggers intensive affective commitment. In addition, perceiving CSR action as weak or strong is found not to change the established affective commitment among cynics, while leading materialists to develop strong emotional bonds through brand ethicality perceived exaggeratedly. Furthermore, cynics are found predisposed to making brand-related judgments on a rational basis, while materialists mostly address such issues on an emotional basis.
... The first approach suggests that customer engagement can be presented at any format which brings necessary results [Ashley et al., 2011] and the main research challenge is to uncover and manage those antecedents of customer engagement that maximize outcomes [Kujur, Singh, 2019;Alvarez-Milan et al., 2018]. The second approach implies that customer engagement is a desirable state to keep customer in [Beckers, Van Doorn, Verhoef, 2018], but the difference in efficiency of engagement practices is defined by its match with the value customers get [Grewal et al., 2017;Kaltcheva et al., 2014]. Despite the seeming similarity between research presented in this cluster and those in clusters above, there is a key difference for each. ...
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Gamification captured the attention of both marketing researchers and practitioners about a decade ago. Despite the established conceptualization of gamification as a driver of intrinsic motivation and a range of empirical research on the topic, there is still uncertainty about its place as a marketing tool. Some researchers argue that gamification acts as a driver of customer engagement, others consider it as an outcome of the process. Such dual nature raises the question of the role which gamification plays in customer relationship management. This study aims to analyze gamification through the lenses of customer engagement theory in order to identify the features of the relationship between these concepts. To achieve that a bibliometric analysis was conducted and the existing knowledge on the topic of customer engagement was systematized. The findings were divided into four clusters and the content of those clusters was analyzed in details. Gamification was compared with the key customer engagement practices. Which allowed to identify four types of customers in terms of engagement in gamification: supporters, spectators, super fans, and fun seekers. The proposed classification may be used by both academics and practitioners for estimating potential outcomes of using gamification for engagement purposes among different types of customers.
... According to the results, positive and significant impact of RQ on CPV was supported. The result of this hypothesis is in line with those of Itani et al. (2019) and Kaltcheva et al. (2014). Moreover, the effect of RQ on attitudinal loyalty was supported. ...
... CBE has been conceptualised in different perspectives: a psychological state perspective (Brodie et al., 2011;Hollebeek, 2011), a behavioural perspective (van Doorn et al., 2010;Hollebeek et al., 2017) and a psychological process perspective (Bowden, 2009). Despite the various perspectives on its conceptualisation, the majority of researchers agree that CBE is multidimensional rather than unidimensional, including cognitive, emotional and behavioural dimensions (Brodie et al., 2011;Hollebeek, 2011;So et al., 2012;Wirtz et al., 2013;Kaltcheva et al., 2014). In defining CBE in OBCs, this study follows the work of Hollebeek (2011) andHollebeek et al. (2014), conceptualising CBE in OBCs as "customer's positively valenced brand-related cognitive, emotional, and behavioural activity during or related to brand interactions", as manifested in the form of cognitive processing, affection and activation (Hollebeek et al., 2014). ...
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Purpose Online service brand communities (OBCs) are an essential services marketing channel and relationship marketing tool, in which social capital (SC) is a critical success factor. Underpinned in social identity and social exchange theories, this paper aims to explore the effects of SC on customer brand engagement (CBE), considering the roles of collective psychological ownership (CPO), customer citizenship behaviour (CCB) and perceived community support (PCS). Design/methodology/approach The research model was tested using survey data from 256 participants; 137 from the Xiaomi Community and 119 from the Huawei Fan Club. Partial least squares-structural equation modelling analysis was used. Findings SC drives CBE. CPO and CCB are important mediators, whilst PCS is an important moderator. Practical implications Brand marketers need to foster SC in OBCs to achieve the maximum level of customer engagement. The authors provide recommendations as to how to build structural, relational and cognitive SC, as well as CPO, CCB and PCS. In short, brand marketers need to foster an interactive, empowering and supportive environment. Originality/value The authors further service research around the humanisation of technology. Specifically, OBCs are social spaces for brands and customers, and a key enabler of relationship marketing principles, such as CBE. The authors test the roles of structural, cognitive and relational SC in engagement in OBCs, through CPO and CCB. This holistic picture of engagement in OBCs is an important foundation for future service research.
... Initially, the concept of brand engagement is in the field of psychology known as employee engagement (Vivek, Beatty, & Morgan, 2012). The implementation of employee engagement concept into brand engagement was previously proposed (D. Kaltcheva, Patino, V. Laric, A. Pitta, & Imparato, 2014). Both of these concepts have the same characteristics that reflect feelings of passion (Sarkar & Sreejesh, 2014). ...
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Alan P. Fiske's (1991) Relational Models typology is the latest rigorously developed framework in the social sciences for conceptualizing social interactions. A relational model (class) is a set of schemata, rules, and scripts that people use to construct and construe their interactions with others. Fiske defines six relational models (classes): communal sharing (CS), equality matching (EM), market pricing (MP), authority ranking (AR), asocial (AS), and null. In this chapter, we discuss the implementation of Fiske's Relational Models framework to customers' relationships with for-profit service marketers. Customer relationship management is especially important for service firms because face-to-face interactions between consumers and company representatives are essential to many service industries. It is therefore imperative that customers' perspectives on their relationships with service marketers are well understood. This chapter describes how consumers use the relational models in Fiske's framework to construct their relationships with service organizations. We demonstrate that consumers implementing different relational models are likely to react differently to success and failure encounters with the service marketer. For each relational model, we outline strategies that a service organization may use in order to establish the model in its interactions with consumers. The chapter concludes with a discussion of a customer's use of multiple relational models for the same service marketer.