Article

Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Optics Express (Impact Factor: 3.49). 12/2007; 15(24):15972-86. DOI: 10.1364/OE.15.015972
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Gold punchwork and underdrawing in Renaissance panel paintings are analyzed using both three-dimensional swept source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) and high resolution digital photography. 3D-OCT can generate en face images with micrometer-scale resolutions at arbitrary sectioning depths, rejecting out-of-plane light by coherence gating. Therefore 3D-OCT is well suited for analyzing artwork where a surface layer obscures details of interest. 3D-OCT also enables cross-sectional imaging and quantitative measurement of 3D features such as punch depth, which is beneficial for analyzing the tools and techniques used to create works of art. High volumetric imaging speeds are enabled by the use of a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser as the 3D-OCT light source. High resolution infrared (IR) digital photography is shown to be particularly useful for the analysis of underdrawing, where the materials used for the underdrawing and paint layers have significantly different IR absrption properties. In general, 3D-OCT provides a more flexible and comprehensive analysis of artwork than high resolution photography, but also requires more complex instrumentation and data analysis.

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Available from: James Yi Jiang, Apr 07, 2014
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    • "The most significant impact of OCT is in ophthalmology for in situ examination of the pathologic changes of the retina [5] [6] [7] [8] and measurement of the dimensions of the anterior chamber of the eye [9] [10]. OCT has also been established in a variety of other biomedical applications [11] and for material characterization [12] [13]. "

    Full-text · Chapter · Feb 2012
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    • ". Ou The techniqu system can b especially att Rec OCT imagin series of OC than a second paper we inv entire wavel polarization s Fig. 3. Po utput polarizatio ue using two d be cancelled, i. tractive for end cently, the intro ng speed up to T applications d, and especial vestigate in ho length sweep i switching outp olarization of a 1 on of FDML lase different states .e. it can be rem doscopic PS-O oduction of Fo 370,000 lines [19] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32]. L lly for wavelen ow far FDML is optically st put. "
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