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Abstract

Prayer and verbally answered prayer would seem to offer powerful evidence in relation to the question of human agency. Forty members of an English Pentecostal group completed a questionnaire on prayer: 25 reported an answering voice from God, 15 of them hearing Him aloud. The latter groups were interviewed and characteristics of phenomenology and context elicited. The voice of God cannot be held to be ipso facto pathological and many reported its utility in situations of doubt or difficulty.
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... Systematic academic research has not paid as much attention to this phenomenon; while Brian T. Kaylor (2011) addressed people's claims to have heard or experi enced God speaking, Margaret M. Poloma and Matthew T. Lee's (2011) study of what they term "prophetic prayer" identified only a small sample of individuals (n=4) recounting their experiences of hearing from God. However, Simon Dein and Roland Littlewood (2007) found that 25 of 40 respondents in an English Pentecostal group reported "an answering voice from God," with 15 reporting that they heard God's voice aloud; these responses from God were helpful to those experiencing challenge or doubt. Thus, experiencing an "answered prayer" is not necessarily uncommon, though empirical studies in communication and religion have yet to quantify or qualify this experience. ...
... The program addresses only crisis situations and prayer in such contexts. Dein and Littlewood (2007) report that some people, in prayer, hear the voice of God. An swered Prayers describes only one instance of hearing the voice of God (when Kevin Ramsby heard the auditory message "They still need you"), while the rest of the "voices" described are "inner voices" (for example, when Trisha Gilles "heard" what she describes as an inner voice tell her to pick up her children at school). ...
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