Conference Paper

Evolutionary Design Exploration Systems

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Abstract

This paper proposes a software and hardware architecture for an evolutionary design exploration system for building design. First, the typical architecture for such systems is described. Certain limitations of this typical architecture are identified. The proposed architecture is then described and the advantages of this architecture are highlighted. Finally, the development of systems implementing this architecture is discussed.

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... However, the majority of MDO applications related to building energy-performance are conducted by researchers within the engineering field with a focus on optimizing mechanical systems or façade configurations (Asadi et al., 2012;Adamski, 2007;Wright, Loosemore, and Farmani, 2002). Only a few applications have explored the application of MDO from a designer's perspective, such as the works of Caldas, Janssen and Yi and Malkawi (Caldas, 2008;Janssen, 2009;Yi and Malkawi, 2009). However, these applications are limited to academic experimental settings as conducted by the research team as opposed to designers. ...
... As a result, the examination of methods adoptable by designers remains unexplored. Furthermore, while the importance of form-exploration during the early stage of the design process is addressed, usually a simplified geometry is adopted for proof of concept due to the limited flexibility of said precedents' framework (Flager et al., 2009;Janssen, 2009). As a result, the relationship between designed form-exploration and energy-performance has been largely excluded. ...
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This paper explores the application of a novel multi-disciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework to the early stage design process, through a case study where the designer serves as the primary user and driver. MDO methods have drawn attention from the building design industry as a potential means of overcoming obstacles between design and building performance feedback to support design decision-making. However, precedents exploring MDOs in application to the building design have previously been limited to driving use by engineers or research teams, thereby leaving the incorporation of MDO into a design process by designers largely unexplored. In order to investigate whether MDO can enable the ability to design in a performance environment during the conceptual design stage, a MDO design framework entitled Evolutionary Energy-Performance Feedback for Design (EEPFD) was developed. This paper explores the designer as the primary user by conducting a case study where the application of EEPFD to a single family residential housing unit is incorporated. Through this case study EEPFD demonstrates an ability to assist the designer in identifying higher performing design options while meeting the designer’s aesthetic preferences. In addition the benefits, limitations, concerns and lessons learned in the application of EEPFD are also discussed.
... In the architectural design context, much research has been conducted on exploring design variations and hybrid optimization methods. Janssen (2009) proposed an evolutionary system for design exploration. Turrin et al. (2011) developed a method that combined parametric modeling with genetic algorithms for the design exploration of performance-driven geometries. ...
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"October 2004" Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2005. Includes bibliographical references.
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