Article

An Injury Prevention Perspective on the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

Department of Health Policy and Management, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N Broadway, Rm 557, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
Preventing chronic disease (Impact Factor: 2.12). 08/2009; 6(3):A107.
Source: PubMed

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    • "An estimated 23% of children struck by cars will suffer psychological sequelae (Mayr et al. 2003). Concern about the potential dangers of walking and biking may contribute to childhood obesity and its attendant morbidities (Liu and Mendoza 2014; Pollack 2009). In 2005, the US Congress funded the federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program as part of the federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible and Efficient Transportation Equity Act. "
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    ABSTRACT: In March 2008, a group of experts in anthropology, law, epidemiology, ethics, and social networking met to share their diverse perspectives on preventing childhood obesity. In meeting their charge to identify innovative ways to lower the prevalence of childhood obesity, they asked several questions: What has succeeded and what has not? What are the barriers to success? Whose job is it to address these barriers? We provide a brief background on childhood obesity and highlight some of the ideas generated at the Symposium on Epidemiologic, Ethical, and Anthropologic Issues in Childhood Overweight and Obesity, which took place in March 2008 at Saint George's University, Saint George,
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