Article

Étude MOBI-KIDS : technologies de communication, expositions environnementales et tumeurs cérébrales chez les jeunes, MOBI-KIDS study: Communication technology, environment and brain tumours in young people

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Abstract

Context In recent years, the increasing use of mobile phone in adolescents and more recently in children has generated concern about possible health effects of exposure to radiofrequency. In this context, the aim of the MOBI-KIDS study is to investigate the potential brain tumour risk in children and adolescents related to exposure to electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones and by other exposure sources in their environment. Method MOBI-KIDS is a prospective and multinational epidemiological study with a case-control design. Cases are all patients aged 10–24 years, residing in one of the geographic study areas and for whom an incident primary brain tumour was diagnosed during the study period. For each case, two controls matched on age, sex and geographic area of residence are selected from subjects hospitalized for appendicitis, a common disease in the age group studied. Data collection is carried out through a detailed questionnaire administered during a face-to-face interview. Records of communications are collected from operators along with the consent of the study participants. Discussion The international MOBI-KIDS project as a whole, and especially in France, is a unique opportunity to analyze the relationship between the risk of brain tumours and exposure to radiofrequency and extremely low frequency generated by mobile phones and by other important sources of exposure in the environment of young people.

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... En raison de l'augmentation rapide, dans le monde, de l'utilisation des technologies de télécommunication sans fil, l'étude internationale MOBI-KIDS a été initiée en 2009 avec pour objectif d'évaluer les possibles effets de ces technologies sur la santé des 10-24 ans [8,9]. Les participants ont été interrogés sur leur utilisation des moyens de télécommunications sans fil. ...
... Pour chaque cas, deux témoins appariés sur l'âge, le sexe et la zone géographique de résidence ont été recherchés parmi les patients hospitalisés pour appendicite, pathologie fréquente dans la tranche d'âge étudiée. Plus de détails sur les critères de sélection des cas et des témoins sont disponibles dans des publications antérieures [8,9]. ...
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Background: In less than two decades, the wireless telecommunications sector has grown dramatically. While a large part of the world's population is now equipped with technologies from this sector (mobile phone, wireless residential telephone, Wi-Fi…), little data is available to quantify the use of these technologies. The purpose of this article is to present a description of these uses among young people, a population particularly receptive to these new telecommunication facilities. Methods: As part of the MOBI-KIDS study, a prospective epidemiological case-control study, 288 participants aged 10 to 25 years and living in France were interviewed between March 2011 and March 2015 about their history of use of wireless telecommunication devices. Results: At the interview date, 84% of participants regularly used a mobile phone to make voice calls with an estimated cumulative duration of 45minutes per week. Of these users, 97% used the Short Message Service (SMS) sending function and 70% the data exchange functions. Regarding the use of other technologies, 88% of participants used Wi-Fi, for ten hours a week and 56% the wireless residential telephone. These uses, however, varied according to the sex and/or age of the subjects. Conclusion: The data draw a portrait of use, particularly quantitative, of the main wireless communication technologies in this young population. There is a gradual increase with age in the use of these technologies, while the age of initiation is at an increasingly early age.
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Epidemiologists are now embarking on the evaluation of the hypothesis that exposure to radio frequency energy from low-power wireless communication devices, such as portable cellular telephones, causes brain cancer and other adverse health outcomes. Even in the laboratory, exposures from radio frequency sources are difficult to quantify; their measurement in large populations for epidemiologic study is challenging. In this paper, we outline the nature and magnitude of these exposures and discuss the prospects for obtaining useful measures of exposure for epidemiologic research.
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The rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in possible carcinogenic effects of radio frequency (RF). Because exposure to RF from phones is localized, if a risk exists it is likely to be greatest for tumours in regions with greatest energy absorption. The objective of the current paper was to characterize the spatial distribution of RF energy in the brain, using results of measurements made in two laboratories on 110 phones used in Europe or Japan. Most (97-99% depending on frequency) appears to be absorbed in the brain hemisphere on the side where the phone is used, mainly (50-60%) in the temporal lobe. The average relative SAR is highest in the temporal lobe (6-15%, depending on frequency, of the spatial peak SAR in the most exposed region of the brain) and the cerebellum (2-10%) and decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, particularly at higher frequencies. The SAR distribution appears to be fairly similar across phone models, between older and newer phones and between phones with different antenna types and positions. Analyses of risk by location of tumour are therefore important for the interpretation of results of studies of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use.
Conference Paper
Recent years have seen an explosive growth in the area of wireless communication and, around the world, several hundred millions of subscribers are expected to have mobile phones by the year 2000. With the proliferation of these phones, questions have arisen about the interaction of the electromagnetic field with biological tissues in general, and about the power absorbed by the human head in particular. In this paper we employ efficient numerical techniques to compute the local absorbed power in the head and to predict the modification of the antenna performance due to its close coupling with the head
Jeunecourt Carine et Garsi-Sardano Céline (Île-de-France), Bonnay Stéphanie et Sekrane Fanny (Lor-raine), Radal Bénédicte et Dimper Véronique (Rhône-Isère), Chazara Brigitte (Bouches-du-Rhône), Heintz-Benajar Laïla et du Mazel Franç avec l
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T. Rémen et al. Olivia (Alsace), Jeunecourt Carine et Garsi-Sardano Céline (Île-de-France), Bonnay Stéphanie et Sekrane Fanny (Lor-raine), Radal Bénédicte et Dimper Véronique (Rhône-Isère), Chazara Brigitte (Bouches-du-Rhône), Heintz-Benajar Laïla et du Mazel Franç avec l'aide de Mme Gros Vanessa (Hérault) et M. Schwall Xavier (Gironde).
Rapport Les téléphones mobiles, leurs stations de base et la santé
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le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du Dr Perrot F./[clinique Saint- Charles] le service de chirurgie digestive du Dr Chambon M
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et Vernay A./[clinique Lyon-Nord] le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du Dr Perrot F./[clinique Saint- Charles] le service de chirurgie digestive du Dr Chambon M./[clinique du Val d'Ouest] les services de chirurgie viscérale des Drs Guillem P. et Schreiber V. et de chirurgie pédiatrique du Dr Carlioz P./[polyclinique du Beaujolais] le service de chirurgie digestive, endocrinienne et thoracique du Dr Arnal E.
Rapport Les téléphones mobiles, leurs stations de base et la santé. État des connaissances et recommandations
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The world in 2013: ICT facts and figures features end 2013 estimates for ITU's key telecommunication/ICT indicators. Genève
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Références [1] International Telecommunication Union. The world in 2013: ICT facts and figures features end 2013 estimates for ITU's key telecommunication/ICT indicators. Genève; 2013 [http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/facts/ ICTFactsFigures 2013-e.pdf].
le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du Dr Perrot F./[clinique Saint- Charles] le service de chirurgie digestive du Dr Chambon M./[clinique du Val d'Ouest] les services de chirurgie viscérale des Drs Guillem P. et Schreiber V
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et Vernay A./[clinique Lyon-Nord] le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du Dr Perrot F./[clinique Saint- Charles] le service de chirurgie digestive du Dr Chambon M./[clinique du Val d'Ouest] les services de chirurgie viscérale des Drs Guillem P. et Schreiber V. et de chirurgie pédiatrique du Dr Carlioz P./[polyclinique du Beaujolais] le service de chirurgie digestive, endocrinienne et thoracique du Dr Arnal E.
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