Article

The Warming Acupuncture for Treatment of Sciatica in 30 Cases

Hunan TCM Professional Training College, Zhuzhou 412012, China.
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Impact Factor: 0.72). 03/2009; 29(1):50-3. DOI: 10.1016/S0254-6272(09)60031-5
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To observe the relation between the pain threshold and the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for sciatica.
90 sciatica patients were equally divided at random into the following 3 groups: a warming acupuncture group treated with the needles warmed by burning moxa, a western medicine group administered Nimesulide tablets and a point-injection group with Anisodamine injected. The pain threshold was tested before treatment and after the first, second and third treatment courses.
The warming acupuncture therapy showed better therapeutic effects than the other two groups with significant differences in the change of pain threshold and the improvement of clinical symptoms and signs (P<0.01).
Acupuncture can relieve the symptoms of sciatica with the increase of pain threshold.

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    • "The control group, which had no TCM treatment experience, reported a QOL of 61.69%, while the experimental group, treated with TCM, reported a 77.25% post-treatment QOL score, which is notably higher. The results of this pilot analysis suggest that more definitive research in this area is merited.25–28 Clinical studies that compare the effects of different treatment protocols are probably the most reliable source of evidence, and may also demonstrate a dose-response relationship;29 hence they are more than welcome. "
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