Article

Measuring stress reduction using the infrared negative ions amethyst biomat

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Abstract

George Grant studies the use of infrared ray heat therapy as a means of reducing stress and improving the sleep of patients Background: Twelve subjects were tested before and after using the BioMat for 1 hour daily over a 3.month period using three different biofeedback devices and blood cortisol levels to measure stress reduction. Far infrared/negative ion amethyst BioMat reduces stress by 78%, as validated by pre- and post-biofeedback brain scans, as well as fasting blood test to measure the stress hormone cortisol. The core of the BioMat technology is a combination of far infrared rays, negative ion effects and the conductive properties of amethyst channels. These powerful health stimulators are combined in a single, easy-to-use product with remarkable healing properties. The BioMat delivers soothing, deep-penetrating heat, while stimulating the regeneration of damaged cells in the body. It is a safe and natural way to achieve optimal health now, and maintain a stronger, more resilient body in the future. This effective therapy is now available to medical professionals and home consumers who want to improve health and wellbeing with products based on Nobel prize-winning scientific research pioneered by NASA and developed using pure, natural materials. The BioMat is an approved medical device by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Objectives of the study: Examine the key benefits of the infrared negative ion amethyst BioMat for stress reduction and fatigue, relieving anxiety and promoting relaxation, improving sleep patterns, reducing inflammation, easing joint pain and stiffness, and eliminating toxins in from body. Subject selection criteria: Twelve healthy subjects with mild-to-moderate stress were selected to participate in this case study and signed an informed consent. Subjects with medical, psychiatric conditions, and those taking heavy medication were excluded from the study. Subjects were tested using biofeedback devices before and after using the BioMat daily every week, and a blood test to measure cortisol levels was obtained from each subject before and after 3 months at the completion of the case study. Methods: Twelve subjects were tested before and after using the Bio Mat for 1 hour daily over 2 months using the ICAP brain scan, heart rate variability (HRV) heart scan, and the magnetic resonance bio-analyser. The results were a reduction in stress by 78% among subjects tested and an increased sense of wellbeing. All 12 subjects were tested in Toronto, ON Canada. The psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) were evaluated in a normal sample (n = 12), who were also assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The DASS was shown to possess satisfactory psychometric properties, and the factor structure was substantiated both by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. In comparison to the BDI and BAI, the DASS showed greater separation in factor loadings. The DASS anxiety scale correlated to 0.81 with the BAI, and the DASS depression scale correlated to 0.74 with the BDI. Factor analysis suggested that the BDI differs from the DASS depression scale primarily in that the BDI includes items such as weight loss, insomnia, somatic preoccupation and irritability, which fail to discriminate between depression and other affective states. The factor structure of the combined BDI and BAI items was virtually identical to that reported by Beck for a sample of diagnosed depressed and anxious patients, supporting the view that these clinical states are more severe expressions of the same states that may be discerned in ‘normals’. Implications of the results for the conceptualisation of depression, anxiety and tension/stress are considered, and the utility of the DASS scales in discriminating between these constructs is discussed.

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