Article

Analgesia y sedación en procedimientos pediátricos Parte 1: Aspectos generales, escalas de sedación y valoración del dolor

Authors:
  • Guillermo leon Valencia
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... At this point, published guidelines and recom-mendations gain relevance and they should be complemented and adapted to the actual situation of each facility. [22][23][24] Among the study's weaknesses, we found a relatively small "n" and a significant group heterogeneity, in relation to both the procedure and the sedation and analgesia schedule used, which renders the possibility of performing a global analysis more difficult. ...
... Aquí cobran relevancia las guías y recomendaciones publicadas, que deben ser complementadas y adaptadas a la realidad de cada institución. [22][23][24] Las debilidades del estudio comprenden un "n" relativamente pequeño y una gran heterogeneidad del grupo, tanto en el tipo de procedimiento como en el esquema de sedoanalgesia utilizado, lo que dificulta el análisis global. ...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: As a result of the increased number of both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in pediatric outpatients, sedation and analgesia have gained relevance in this context. Objective: To characterize the type of sedation and analgesia used by pediatric sedation teams in procedures done outside the operating room, as well as its safety and outcome. Population and methods: All procedures performed in 1 month to 5 year old patients under intravenous sedation with midazolam, ketamine, propofol or lidocaine were analyzed over a 14-month period. The Ramsay sedation scale and the CHEOPS pain scale were used to determine the response to the sedation and analgesia administered. Results: A total of 186 procedures were analyzed. The results of the evaluation of response to sedation and analgesia indicated that an adequate deep sedation was obtained in 98% of cases, and that an adequate analgesia was achieved in 92% of patients. Around 12% of the procedures were associated with adverse events, all related to the airways, and none was serious. The only statistically significant endpoint associated with adverse events were procedures which involved airway interventions, i.e., fibrobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or transesophageal echocardiogram, with an OR of 6.27 (95% CI: 1.28-30.63; p = 0.023). Conclusions: In this group of patients, intravenous outpatient sedation and analgesia administered by a specialized team were safe and effective.
Article
Introduction. As a result of the increased number of both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in pediatric outpatients, sedation and analgesia have gained relevance in this context. Objective. To characterize the type of sedation and analgesia used by pediatric sedation teams in procedures done outside the operating room, as well as its safety and outcome. Population and Methods. All procedures performed in 1 month to 5 year old patients under intravenous sedation with midazolam, ketamine, propofol or lidocaine were analyzed over a 14-month period. The Ramsay sedation scale and the CHEOPS pain scale were used to determine the response to the sedation and analgesia administered. Results. A total of 186 procedures were analyzed. The results of the evaluation of response to sedation and analgesia indicated that an adequate deep sedation was obtained in 98% of cases, and that an adequate analgesia was achieved in 92% of patients. Around 12% of the procedures were associated with adverse events, all related to the airways, and none was serious. The only statistically significant endpoint associated with adverse events were procedures which involved airway interventions, i.e., fibrobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or transesophageal echocardiogram, with an OR of 6.27 (95% CI: 1.28-30.63; p = 0.023). Conclusions. In this group of patients, intravenous outpatient sedation and analgesia administered by a specialized team were safe and
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.