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Revision and phylogeny of the European species of the Eurytoma morio species group (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), parasitoids of bark and wood boring beetles

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A revision of Eurytoma (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae) species belonging to the morio group is proposed. Species discrimination is based on morphological and, partly, on molecular data, including the barcoding fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and the D2 expansion region of the 28S ribosomal gene. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses largely support the morphological evidence. Eurytoma cristata Delvare sp. nov., Eurytoma saliphila Delvare sp. nov., and Eurytoma sylviae Delvare sp. nov. are described from France, Eurytoma ithma Delvare sp. nov. is described from France and Italy, and Eurytoma gatesi Delvare sp. nov. is described from North America and France. Decatomidea polygraphi Ashmead, 1894 and Ipideurytoma spessivtsevi Bouček & Novicky, 1954 are synonymized with Eurytoma afra Boheman, 1836. Eurytoma auricoma Mayr, 1878 is removed from synonymy with Eurytoma arctica Thomson, 1875 and is synonymized with Eurytoma maura Boheman, 1836. Eurytoma eccoptogastri Ratzeburg, 1844, Eurytoma flavoscapularis Ratzeburg, 1844, Eurytoma flavovaria Ratzeburg, 1844, and Eurytoma masii var. flavonigra Russo, 1938 are synonymized with Eurytoma morio Boheman, 1836. Eurytoma masii Russo, 1925 and Eurytoma kemalpasensis Narendran, Tezcan & Civelek, 1995 are synonymized with Eurytoma striolata Ratzeburg, 1848. Eurytoma melanoneura Walker, 1871 and E. masii are removed from synonymy with E. morio. Lectotypes are designated for E. afra, E. auricoma, E. masii, Decatoma aloisifilippoi Russo, 1938, and E. masii var. flavonigra. © 2014 The Linnean Society of London

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... spongiosa Bugbee, 1951 revealed one more cryptic taxon that was subsequently described as a separate species Eu. shorthousei Zhang et Gates, 2017 . Besides, new species were detected and described within the Eurytoma morio Boheman, 1836 species complex based on molecular markers (COI and D2 segment of 28S rDNA) combined with morphological characters (Delvare et al., 2014). Similar analysis of the British members of the genus Tetramesa Walker, 1848, using both molecular and biochemical characters, revealed sympatric populations with a varying degree of mutual isolation (Al- Barrak et al., 2004). ...
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Studies of some shot-hole borer species and their natural enemies The biology of some shot-hole borer species is not yet fully elucidated especially with regard to voltinism. Development ofTrypodendron domesticum L. is protracted and thus multivoltism simulated. This species is, however, generally univoltine although occasionally a partial second generation may be found. The same applies forXyleborinus saxeseni Ratz. Two parasite species have been found:Perniphora robusta Ruschka (Pteromalidae) andIpideurytoma spessivtsevi Boucek & Novicky (Eurytomidae). All investigators agree that the former is a specific primary ectoparasite of ambriosa beetles whereas the status of the latter is still disputed. The problem is discussed and phenological-, morphological-, parasitological- and geographical criteria are provided which suggest thatI. spessivtsevi is also a primary ectoparasite of shot-hole borers. The effect of both the Chalcididae is low. Rate of parasitism is in most cases below 10 per cent and on average even below 3 per cent. Other natural enemies (predacious beetles and mites) and diseases (bacteriosis) may increase the total effect to over 50 per cent.
Article
Des observations ont été effectuées sur la morphologie des stades préimaginaux et le cycle de développement d'Eurytoma waachtli Mayr., qui se développe en ectoparasite sur les larves de 4e stade du curculionidePissodes validirostris Gyll. dans les cônes de pin sylvestre. On a constaté que le chalcidien n'attaque les larves dePissodes que si celles-ci sont préalablement parasitées et paralysées par des ichneumonides du genreScambus. E. waachtli détruit d'abord la larve deScambus puis se développe sur la larve du Coléoptère. Un tel comportement peut être qualifié de cleptoparasite. Le développement d'E.waachtli, en général monovoltin, est étroitement lié à la fois à celui dePissodes et à celui deScambus sp. En limitant le nombre de parasites primaires,E. waachtli joue un rôle favorable à l'accroissement des populations dePissodes validirostris. Observations have been carried out on the morphology of the pre-imaginal stages and the life cycle ofEurytoma waachtli Mayr., which occurs as ectoparasite on 4th instar larvae of the weevilPissodes validirostris Gyll. in cones of Scotch pines. It has been established that the attack by this chalcidid ofPissodes larvae occurs only when they have been previously parasitized and paralysed by ichneumonids of the genusScambus. First,E. waachtli kills the larva ofScambus, then feeds on the weevil larva. Such a behaviour may be called “cleptoparasitism”. The development ofE. waachtli generally monovoltine, is strongly related both to the development ofPissodes and ofScambus sp. By limiting the number of primary parasites,E. waachtli is playing a part in the increase ofP. validirostris population levels.
Article
Procedures utilizing Chelex 100 chelating resin have been developed for extracting DNA from forensic-type samples for use with the PCR. The procedures are simple, rapid, involve no organic solvents and do not require multiple tube transfers for most types of samples. The extraction of DNA from semen and very small bloodstains using Chelex 100 is as efficient or more efficient than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. DNA extracted from bloodstains seems less prone to contain PCR inhibitors when prepared by this method. The Chelex method has been used with amplification and typing at the HLA DQ alpha locus to obtain the DQ alpha genotypes of many different types of samples, including whole blood, bloodstains, seminal stains, buccal swabs, hair and post-coital samples. The results of a concordance study are presented in which the DQ alpha genotypes of 84 samples prepared using Chelex or using conventional phenol-chloroform extraction are compared. The genotypes obtained using the two different extraction methods were identical for all samples tested.
Article
The phylogeny of the cryptic species complex of wasps in the genus Nasonia was inferred by analysis of nucleotide sequences of an rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the D2 region of 28S rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis showed that N. vitripennis descended from a theoretical common ancestor with that of a lineage that diverged into N. longicornis and N. giraulti. Differences in the ITS2 regions clearly distinguished two strains of N. giraulti. Another member of the Dibrachys Group, Trichomalopsis dubius, was placed outside of the Nasonia complex. The D2 region had a base substitution rate approximately 2 times slower than the ITS2 region and was used to resolve the phylogenetic affiliation of an eulophid, Melittobia digitata, to the pteromalids. Tree topology of the Nasonia complex was congruent with the phylogeny of a cluster of Wolbachia bacteria which infect these insects. The possible role of these bacteria in driving speciation is discussed.
1836. Skandinaviska Pteromaliner. Kongliga Vetenskaps-Akademiens Handlingar 1836
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Hedqvist KJ. 1966. Notes on some reared chalcid flies from Finland (Hym., Chalcidoidea). Annales Entomologici Fennici 32: 194-199.
Eurytoma bouceki n.sp. (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae) reared from seeds of the European larch - Larix decidua Mill. and the Polish larch L. polonica Rac
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Skrzypczynska M. 1975a. Eurytoma bouceki n.sp. (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae) reared from seeds of the European larch -Larix decidua Mill. and the Polish larch L. polonica Rac. Polskie Pismo Entomologiczne 45: 150-159.
A new Eurytoma species from Pissodes validirostris Gyll. and notes on some other species reared from the same host (Hym.: Chalcidoidea, Eurytomidae and Ichneumonoidea, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae)
  • Hedqvist
Hedqvist KJ. 1974. A new Eurytoma species from Pissodes validirostris Gyll. and notes on some other species reared from the same host (Hym.: Chalcidoidea, Eurytomidae and Ichneumonoidea, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae). Annales Entomologici Fennici 40: 28-30.
Eurytoma morio Boheman
  • Fig
  • ........................................... 22a
0 times as wide as long (Fig. 22A)............................................. Eurytoma morio Boheman, 1836 6(1′).
Monographia Chalciditum
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