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Physical Discomfort May Be Reduced in the Presence of Interior Plants

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A well-known research report showed that being in a hospital room with a view of trees rather than a view of a building was linked to the use of fewer pain-reducing medications by patients recovering from surgery. The experiment reported here was designed to further examine the role of plants in pain perception. We found that more subjects were willing to keep a hand submerged in ice water for 5 min if they were in a room with plants present than if they were in a room without plants. This was found to be true even when the room without plants had other colorful objects that might help the subject focus on something other than the discomfort. Results from a room assessment survey confirmed that the room with colorful, nonplant objects was as interesting and colorful as the room with plants present, but the presence of plants was perceived as making the air in the room fresher.
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... Participants completed a 2-item bipolar adjective scale (Lohr & Pearson-Mims, 2000; measuring the perceived attractiveness of the scenarios. Items included "pleasant-unpleasant" to measure how physically attractive, and "friendly-unfriendly" for measuring how socially attractive the attributes of the environments are (Dijkstra et al., 2008;Park et al., 2013). ...
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