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The effects of mindfulness meditation training on multitasking in a high-stress information environment

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We describe an experiment to determine the effects of meditation training on the multitasking behavior of knowledge workers. Three groups each of 12-15 human resources personnel were tested: (1) those who underwent an 8-week training course on mindfulness-based meditation, (2) those who endured a wait period, were tested, and then underwent the same 8-week training, and (3) those who had 8-weeks of training in body relaxation. We found that only those trained in meditation stayed on tasks longer and made fewer task switches, as well as reporting less negative emotion after task performance, as compared with the other two groups. In addition, both the meditation and the relaxation groups showed improved memory for the tasks they performed.
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... Based on the above arguments, the following hypotheses are framed: Previous studies have conclusively shown that technostress can significantly undermine an employee's performance when utilizing IT for work tasks (Chen & Muthitacharoen, 2016). Excessive multitasking, alongside interruptions, significantly affect the effectiveness of an individual within work settings (Levy et al., 2012;Tarafdar et al., 2010). Moreover, employees who resist learning new technologies encounter numerous errors and failures with the system and experience frustration, thus leading to reduced performance (Tarafdar et al., 2010). ...
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http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/112158/1/sosenko.pdf
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