Article

Sexual Stimulation Device-Related Injuries

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Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to determine the incidence of sexual stimulation device (SSD)-related injuries among U.S. adults. From 1995 to 2006, 198 individuals (representing a national estimate of 8415 individuals) sought emergency care due to an SSD-related injury to the vaginal, penile, or anorectal body regions. Rates were highest for ages 30-39 (4.26/1,000,000) and 40-49 (3.40/1,000,000), and the rates for men compared to women were particularly high for ages 40 and older. While rare in previous years, the pattern of SSD-related injuries suggests these injuries may become more common and are disproportionately affecting older males.

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... Vibrators are arguably a high-risk therapeutic device because they are inserted into body cavities and often shared between partners Reece et al., 2009;Reece et al., 2010). In fact, the majority of sexual device-related emergency department visits are due to a vibrator beyond reach in the anal cavity of men (i.e. an anal foreign body) (Griffin & McGwin, 2009), and there has been at least one fatality due to rectal perforation from a vibrator (Waraich, Hudson, & Iftikhar, 2007). Additionally, sharing sexual devices has been shown to increase the risk of sexually transmitted infections, including human papillomavirus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (Anderson, Schick, Herbenick, Dodge, & Fortenberry, 2014;Kwakwa & Ghobrial, 2003). ...
... Air drying is recommended to avoid towel lint. For jelly rubber sexual devices that contain phthalates or for risk-avoidant The incorrect use of a vibrator is the most common sexual device-related emergency in both men and women (Griffin & McGwin, 2009). This is especially relevant for men who have sex with men, 87% of whom report anal insertion of a vibrator during self-stimulation . ...
... Sexual devices used in the anus should have a wide base or an attached string to avoid loss in the anal cavity. Patients should seek medical treatment immediately if an injury occurs with the use of a sexual device, including lodging of a vibrator in any body orifice (Donaldson et al., 2014;Griffin & McGwin, 2009). ...
Article
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Vibrators are an evidence-based treatment for a variety of sexual dysfunctions and sexual enhancement; however, the use of a genital vibrator lacks best practice recommendations. This aim of this article is to provide current, best practice recommendations regarding the use of vibratory stimulation for the treatment of sexual dysfunction and/or sexual or relationship enhancement. A multidisciplinary team of sexual health specialists collaborated to develop best practice recommendations based on a narrative literature review. Recommendations for the use of vibratory stimulation for the treatment of sexual dysfunction are provided, with special attention to counseling patients on choosing and safely using a vibrator. Further study is needed to determine the most effective methods to counsel patients on vibrator use and to provide evidence-based cleaning recommendations.
... Scientific reports on sexual device-related injuries are scarce, but were investigated in the USA based on representative sampling of patients in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). According to that study, the national incidence rate of sex device-related injuries was 0.24 per 100,000 in 1995 and 0.55/100,000 in 2006, of which 78% were anorectal injuries [8], numbers far lower than ours. ...
Article
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PurposeRetained foreign rectal objects may require surgical removal. To estimate the magnitude of this problem, we report the incidence and treatment of retained rectal objects at a large emergency hospital, and calculate incidence rates at the national level in Sweden. Methods All local patient records during 2009–2017 with the diagnosis foreign body in anus and rectum (ICD-10 T185) were accessed and analyzed retrospectively. All Swedish in- and outpatient visits during 2005–2016 with the code T185 were accessed from the National Patient Register. ResultsWe show an increasing incidence in rectal foreign bodies in Swedish national data. The increase was most noticeable in men, and in our local register there was an overrepresentation of sex toys leading to laparotomy and stoma. Conclusions To mitigate surgical cost and comorbidity, policies to decrease the risk of retained sex toys could be considered.
... Further, when anal penetration was by an object other than a penis, only 25% of respondents considered it to be sex, with significantly more women considering this behavior to be sex than men (35.7% vs. 12.8%). Although there is a lower likelihood of transmitting an STI with an object other than a penis, some risk still exists (Anderson, Schick, Herbenick, Dodge, & Fortenberry, 2014), as does risk of another type: most sexual stimulation device-related emergency room visits are due to vibrators lodged in the anorectal region of men (Griffin & McGwin, 2009). Thus, it is important for medical students to be aware of the potential risks of sexual stimulation devices and to ask behaviorally based questions about the use of such devices, as well as to educate patients on the proper usage (e.g., do not share the device with others, do not use anally and then vaginally, only use an anal device that has a base). ...
Article
An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex. More than 25% of participants did not consider genital-genital contact without penetration, oral-genital contact, foreign object in rectum, and forced vaginal/rectal penetration as sex. Nonheterosexuals were more likely to consider genital-genital contact without penetration sex. We determined there was less than complete consensus among future physicians on what activities are considered sex.
... In this review, for a total of 4,300 patients, the age spanned from a 13-year-old male patient to an 80-year-old male patient. In another review concerning sexual stimulation device-related injuries [8], the results were consistent with other reports cited, with the majorities of patients being males and of younger age. When real urologic emergencies are concerned, the findings are the following. ...
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A middle-aged man was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain and bleeding per rectum. Subsequent laparotomy indicated an established faecal peritonitis in relation to an anterior perforation of the upper rectum. He later volunteered that he had anal intercourse 2 days previously with a vibrator at an erotic party. His partner volunteered further information regarding devient practice such as regular insertion of other foreign objects (e.g. shower hose). Tearing of the rectal mucosa following such practices is a recognised complication. However mortality following foreign body perforation is reported as extremely rare in the medical literature. Surgical repair of rectal perforation and intensive treatment did not prevent development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) hence leading to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. This case report highlights the seriousness of rectal injuries following unusual sexual practices. Death in this case can be attributed to the late presentation and established faecal peritonitis. Death due to retroperitoneal perforation following such accidents have been reported in the literature. However previously no cases have been recorded where death occurred due to anterior rectal wall perforation.
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