Article

CS Ed Week 2013: the hour of code

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

As advertised in the October 2013 edition of the Bulletin, this year's CS Ed Week encouraged everyone to host an "Hour of Code" event, in which educators hosted (at least) an hour of CS instruction to any audience they chose. SIGCSE members responded to the call enthusiastically. Here is just a sampling of the many great Hour of Code events that were put on.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... But, bringing computer science to younger grades comes with challenges. Though many K-8 teachers have added computer science to their curriculum [1], they are unlikely to have had formal training in how to teach computer science. In this paper, we provide practical tips for people who are interested in teaching computer science and who are creating material for computer science curricula. ...
... Another recent educational movement, the "Hour of Code" has attempted to increase the amount of computer programming present on K-12 school campuses [1]. Since December 2012, over 20,000 teachers from kindergarten to 12 th grade have implemented some type of computer programming lesson in their classrooms [14]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The recent growth of interest in computer science has created a movement to more readily introduce computer science in K-12 classrooms. However, little research exists on how to successfully bring computer science to lower grade levels. In this paper, we present advice for researchers and curriculum developers who are getting started working with computer science in elementary schools. Specifically, we focus on practical tips for studies of this nature, developed from our experiences piloting a computational thinking curriculum with 4 th-6 th grade students. We address issues arising in elementary school classrooms such as recruiting and interfacing with teachers and schools, classroom management strategies, student computer literacy and developmental stages, and curriculum life cycles.
... Computer programming provides avenues for young students to creatively express their ideas and interests using technology. With the recent increase of graphical, block-based programming environments, more students are starting to code at a younger age [1,2]. This fervor around coding recently increased with President Obama's call for "Computer Science for All." ...
... Martin [29] asked incoming freshmen enrolled in an introductory computer science course: (1) what is computer science? and (2) to draw a computer scientist. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We developed the Draw-A-Computer-Scientist-Test (DACST) to better understand elementary school students' conceptions of computer scientists and the nature of their work. By understanding how young children perceive computer scientists, we can broaden their ideas about the activities and images of computer scientists. We administered the DACST to 87 fourth-grade students (ages 8-9) as a pre- and post-assessment to a computer science curriculum. All students attended the same school and were taught by the same female teacher. Before the curriculum, we found that students most often drew male computer scientists working alone, and featured actions that were connected to technology in general (e.g., typing, printing), but not specific to computer science. After the curriculum, more female students drew female computer scientists than before, and the featured actions were more specific to computer science (e.g., programming a game). We also share insights about the classroom-learning environment that may have contributed to changes in students' understanding of computer scientists and their work.
... Asimismo, en este marco se destacan iniciativas como "Code.org" que ofrecen actividades en más de 20 idiomas dentro de la propuesta la "Hora del código", donde han participado más de trescientos millones de personas (Alvarado, 2014). ...
Article
Full-text available
Online programming environments with blocks have introduced programming in multiple educational contexts. However, in order to guarantee students, the right of access to these novel contents on an equal footing, it is important to identify the adequacy of these virtual spaces to web accessibility guidelines. Based on this issue, a case study was carried out to evaluate the online Scratch platform according to web 2.0 accessibility guidelines. The results showed that the web for projects creation is not accessible to multiple groups of people. From this, it is noticed the importance of having technologies that allow learning to program from a non-exclusive and complex approach, recognizing the barriers presented by the tools in the design process of educational programs, trajectories of teacher training and in the development of policies related to these issues.
... Abordagens para iniciantes têm combinado atividades lúdicas e criativas com programação visual, geralmente baseada em encaixe de blocos, para motivar e facilitar o processo. Para amparar tais atividades, utiliza-se ferramentas consolidadas, como Scratch 1 , ou mais recentes, como os jogos e tutoriais do Code.org 2 , que estão presentes em experiências no exterior e no Brasil [Wyffels et al. 2014, Alvarado 2014, Mota et al. 2014, Martins et al. 2016]. ...
Conference Paper
O desenvolvimento de habilidades de programação na educação básica tem sido alvo de muitas iniciativas, geralmente amparadas em ferramentas computacionais consolidadas e especialmente concebidas para este público. Neste trabalho, explora-se um recurso pouco conhecido neste meio, denominado Studio Sketchpad, que utiliza a programação textual baseada na linguagem Javascript. Dentre suas principais características, estão a facilidade de expressar criações com apelo visual e a possibilidade de criar programas colaborativamente. O Studio Sketchpad foi utilizado em oficinas oferecidas a um grupo de alunos de ensino médio, revelando pontos fortes e limitações que podem contribuir à replicação da experiência em contextos semelhantes.
... Educational initiatives such as Hour of Code, coupled with an increase in novicefriendly, graphical programming environments (e.g., Scratch, Blockly, Alice, etc.), have provided more developmentallyappropriate opportunities to expose younger children to computer science. For example, over 4.5 million upper elementary school students (aged 9-12) participated in the 2014 Hour of Code [2]. Additionally, President Obama's recent initiative, Computer Science for All, seeks to expose all students to computer science, empowering the next generation of American students with the computing skills necessary to thrive in a digital economy [3]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we present an analysis of 123 students' (aged 9-12) digital stories created in a visual block-based programming language across three grade levels (grades 4-6). These students were all involved in the same introductory computer science curriculum. Participating students attended the same school and received computer science instruction from the same teacher within the context of the academic day. We analyzed each project for the extent of user-centered design that the student programmed. Specifically, we identified two components of user-centered design: 1) the programmed control choices students used, and 2) if/how they communicated those mechanisms of control to the user. Our work indicates that students in fifth and sixth grade (aged 10-12) used higher diversity of event blocks and coordinated action across multiple sprites at a higher rate compared to fourth grade students (aged 9-10). In contrast, fourth grade students tended to create more simplistic programs, rarely coordinating actions across multiple sprites. This work suggests that the construct of user-centered design within visual block-based programming languages is more complex than previously indicated. Additionally, explicit instruction about user-centered design is necessary, but may be more effective when a student reaches the age of 10 or 11 years old. CCS Concepts • Human-centered computing~ User centered design • Human-centered computing~ Graphical user interfaces • Social and professional topics~ Computing education • Social and professional topics~ K-12 education
... Additionally, programmers may use these online environments to follow coding tutorials, such as "The Hour of Code" on Code.org [4], and modify or expand code snippets provided in the lessons. In the curriculum and interface we designed, students were given sample scripts or partially completed programs to revise or complete [5]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Visual block-based programming environments allow elementary school students to create their own programs in ways that are more accessible than in textual programming environments. These environments help students write code by removing syntax errors and reducing typing. Students create code by dragging, dropping, and snapping constructs together (e.g. blocks) that are organized by lists, colors, shape, images, etc. However, programming in visual block-based environments is not always simple; in fact, it can become complex quickly. In addition to elements that create code, the visual aspects of these environments provide readers information about what happens, when, and how. Here, we focus on how students used visual cues when reading programs in our block-based programming environment, LaPlaya, a variant of Scratch. Specifically we identified the visual cues students noticed and acted upon. These included not only those that were intended by designers (perceptible affordances), but also those that were not intended by designers (false affordances). Through a detailed content analysis of 13 focus groups with fourth graders we created an initial taxonomy of visual cues in our programming environment and explored how students used these cues to make predictions about provided code, and the types of affordances such cues offered students.
... Over 4.5 million 4 th -6 th grade students participated in the 2014 Hour of Code, hosted by Code.org [1]. Other programming platforms have recently been developed, increasing the available opportunities that young students have to program (e.g., Scratch, Alice, Blockly, Tinker, etc.). ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As computer science moves from an outreach activity to a normal classroom activity in the multi-subject, mainstream elementary school classroom, curricula need to be examined to ensure they are meeting the needs of diverse students. In this paper, we present how Universal Design for Learning (UDL) was used to develop and refine a programming environment and curriculum for upper-elementary school classrooms (students aged 9-12). We then present our accommodations and modifications to emphasize the ways our development environment and/or curriculum enabled such uses. Ensuring introductory computer science experiences are equitable and accessible for a wide range of student learners may broaden the diversity of individuals who perceive themselves as capable of pursuing computer science in the future.
... Over 4.5 million 4 th -6 th grade students participated in this fall's Hour of Code, hosted by Code.org [2]. As coding becomes integrated into the traditional school day, research-based findings need to inform the instructional design of curriculum and accompanying resources for students and teachers. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we present our analysis of 92 fourth graders' digital story projects completed in LaPlaya, a Scratch-like programming environment. Projects were analyzed for the way that students programmed the start of the story, and if the program integrated user-centered design by providing instruction to the user on how to interact with the digital story. We found that fourth grade students rarely used user-centered design while creating digital stories in our block-based programming environment. Without explicit instruction, the demands of learning programming and simultaneously programming for an abstract user may be too cognitively demanding for the average fourth grader.
Chapter
With the development of computer technology, children’s programming technology has become increasingly mature. However, the current content and form of children’s programming tools are too singular and do not integrate well with daily life skills. In the era of vigorously advocating environmental protection, it is particularly important to cultivate children’s environmental awareness and ability from an early age. The paper described a new edutainment tool named Clas-Maze, for children in 5–9 years old, which combines tangible programming and living knowledge, such as garbage classification. Clas-Maze consists of three parts: Programming blocks which can be used to construct a program to control the garbage’s route, external camera which can be used to collect the information of programming blocks, and the virtual environment which is the execution interface of the system on the computer. We wanted to explore whether the system is helpful to children in learning garbage classification and programming, and the difference between single and collaborative learning. So we conducted a user experiment with 37 children. The results showed that Clas-Maze can help children learn programming and garbage classification. Single and cooperative programming have their own advantages. In order to cultivate children’s ability of decision-making, communication and cooperation, people can choose cooperative programming.
Chapter
This paper presents João em Foco, a Learning Object (LO) to help professionals and parents to understand about dyslexia, a specific learning disorder. The LO provides information about diagnosis, treatment and better practices to help the development of people in this condition, overcoming different barriers faced by them. The validation process was performed with Pedagogy students of the State University of Feira de Santana and by the feedback of specialized professionals that deal with dyslexic people from the ABCD Institute, a social organization that disseminates projects that have a positive impact on the lives of people with dyslexia.
Conference Paper
Computer science is about learning how to think. It is applicable to everything. Most industries in the 21st century are directed towards digitized processes using up-to-date technologies. This increases the need for students to know how these technologies work, especially with the availability of smart and handy devices. As a preliminary step to learning programming, students should learn basics of logical and computational thinking. Computational thinking compromises the skills, concepts, and behaviors used to solve problems. Some visual platforms, such as Scratch and Alice, were introduced to teach children programming. The platform introduced in this paper aims at teaching young children (in the age range of 8–9 years old) the preliminary concepts of programming including sequential blocks, conditional blocks, and iterative blocks. This is achieved through an interactive, gesture-based game, where the Kinect Sensor device is used to control the gameplay instead of playing it using a normal PC. The game was tested using a between-group experimental model with two subgroups; an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group used the game whereas the control group was taught using a traditional educational method. The results showed a significant difference between the two groups with a P-value of < 0.05 for both the learning gain and the engagement level.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.