Conference Paper

A hardware/software simulation environment for energy harvesting wireless sensor networks

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Abstract

Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consist of wirelessly communicating nodes with an autarkic power supply for each node. Typically, the consumable energy of these nodes is very limited. Energy harvesting systems (EHSs) can be used to extend the lifetime or even enable perpetual operation of the sensor nodes. Applicable energy-aware WSN protocols and applications usually raise the complexity such that rough calculations are not sufficient any more. Simulation-based analysis is needed to cope with the complexity of hardware/software interaction and its implications. This work presents a simulation environment which enables combined simulation and performance evaluation of complete WSNs including the sensor nodes' application software, the energy harvesting enhanced hardware, the wireless network communication, and the environment of the sensor nodes.

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... The inherent unpredictability of energy harvesting yield has prompted a new generation of EH-aware WSN simulators, such as GreenCastalia [4], SensEH [9], HarvWSNet [11], WSNSim [18], extensions to NS-3 [8,23] and other works [15,14,19]. Using EH-aware WSN simulators allow researchers to explore the design space of various EH-WSN policies and sub-systems within reasonable time, allowing experimental control and repeatability of environmental conditions of interest. ...
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