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A preliminary study of small scavenging crustaceans collected by baited traps in a coral reef of bidong Island, Malaysia

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In order to examine small invertebrate scavenging fauna of tropical coral reef waters, baited traps were deployed in a coral reef of Bidong Island, Malaysia. The samples taken by the traps constituted only a single species of isopods (Cirolana sp.) and ostracods from three families (Cypridinidae, Cylindroleberididae, and Paradoxostomatidae). Cirolanid isopods were never collected in net-samples suggesting they are hyperbenthic scavenging species. Judging from its sheer numbers in the bait-attracted community (86.1-98.6%), cirolanid isopods are one of the most important small invertebrate scavengers in coral reef waters of Bidong Island.
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