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Music and Society in North India: From the Mughals to the Mutiny

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Abstract

The period from early 18th century leading up to the Mutiny of 1857 witnessed massive political and socio-cultural turmoil which impacted the evolution of musical culture as well. This paper synthesises existing historical work on the complex evolution of musical culture in northern India during the period, focusing on the origins and development of those forms that became identified as mainstream classical Hindustani music in the 20th century.

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... (Schofield 2000 (Schofield , 2003 (Schofield /2004 (Schofield , 2007b (Schofield , a, 2010 6 I should also point to the collaboration of Jon Barlow and Lakshmi Subramanian publishing in the Economic and Political Weekly(Barlow and Subramanian 2007). This last work is historical and part of a series that Subramanian has been writing for the Economic and Political Weekly(Subramanian 1999),(Subramanian 2006b). ...
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