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GETTING THE BALANCE RIGHT Commercial Loading in Online Video Programs

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Abstract

Ad-sponsored online video programs currently use a range of commercial loading that varies from exactly the same, compared with broadcast and cable networks, to very much lower. This paper provides empirical evidence about the effects of different levels of commercial loading in online video on perceptions of ad intrusiveness and ad effectiveness, and uses skin conductance to directly observe the potentially enhancing effects of commercial disruption on arousal during the program. The results show that one ad per break maximizes both this disruptive effect and ad recall. As predicted by Nelson, Meyvis, and Galak (2009), popular prime-time television shows do not evoke a decrease in arousal over time and are not enhanced by commercial disruption.

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... Prior research has found no significant difference in perceived advertising intru siveness between preroll and midroll adver tising (Bellman et al., 2012). But midroll advertisements are more effective than preroll placements in terms of branded advertising recall, because of the "attention spillover" effect from the program to the midroll advertising (Li and Lo, 2015). ...
... Additionally, when the level of clutter seen in traditional television is reproduced in a digital-video program, it is perceived as significantly more intrusive-and delivers significantly less recall effectiveness-than midroll advertising (Bellman et al, 2012). ...
... But arousal generally declines if viewers consciously decide to disengage encoding and storage resources away from process ing the advertisements in the break (Bellman et al, 2012;Potter, 2009), with consequent negative effects on advertising memorability (Lang, 2000). At its most extreme, disengage ment can involve viewers fast-forwarding advertisements (Teixeira, 2012), or leaving and reentering the room (Danaher, 1995). ...
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... To control the effect of commercial loading on ad memorability (Bellman et al. 2012), the selected video programs were restricted to a short duration (i.e., three to four minutes). The chosen lengths of in-stream video ads were 15 seconds and 30 seconds, which match typical online video ad lengths (Interactive Advertising Bureau 2008) and represent a distinction between short ads and long ads. ...
... First, we examined video advertising with short-form video programs (less than five minutes). Of note, placing video ads of the same length in video programs of different lengths would affect ad memorability due to the effect of commercial loading (Bellman et al. 2012). Thus, conducting relevant studies with different forms of video programs would presumably provide another insight into online video advertising. ...
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... Experimental Design. The experimental setting aimed to make the participants feel as if they were viewing the videos at home (Bellman et al., 2012). The participants, due to the available laboratory space, viewed the ads in a room in groups of 20. ...
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  • Mtv Networks
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Online Video Usage Up 45%
  • Nielsen
Nielsen (2011), "January 2011: Online Video Usage Up 45%," Nielsen Wire (February 11), available at http://blog.nielsen .com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/january-2011-online-videousage-up-45/ (accessed July 3, 2012).
We'll Be Right Back. Honest': How 'Seriously Short Breaks' Keep Viewers Around to Watch the Ads
  • Brian Rock
  • Virginia Beal
Rock, Brian, and Virginia Beal (2007), "'We'll Be Right Back. Honest': How 'Seriously Short Breaks' Keep Viewers Around to Watch the Ads," paper presented at the ESOMAR, Worldwide Multi Media Measurement (WM 3 ) conference, Dublin, June 3-6, available at www.esomar.org/web/ research_papers/Advertising-Research_1560_We-ll-beright-back-Honest.php/ (accessed July 3, 2012).