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Predicting and changing behavior: A reasoned action approach

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http://www.amazon.com/Prediction-Change-Health-Behavior-Applying/dp/080586282X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398279449&sr=8-1&keywords=Prediction+and+Change+of+Health+Behavior%3A+Applying+the+reasoned+action+approach
... It is therefore important that the communication with the patient is effective and allows to obtain the necessary data to understand their disease and make the necessary changes to improve their health (Martin, 2011). An integrated communication model considers health behavior as the result of conscious intentions, and the formation of these intentions as the result of the effect of information and knowledge that forms attitudes (Ajzen, 1980 and1991), which lead to the application of the expected behavior. ...
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A descriptive, qualitative and cross-cutting type study was conducted, with the primary purpose of preventive intervention, non-randomized, open masking, with an active monitoring group of first-class health personnel in a rural community. Knowledge and practices were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, n= 68, and their relationship to adherence to treatment and exposure to modifiable risk factors. Among the most outstanding results, we find that the group in analysis is in a state of anxiety and with problems in mobility to carry out their daily activities. These problems are attributed as effects of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The causes that triggered diabetes mellitus and hypertension and the complications they present are unknown to and do not include patients, linking them to lived emotional consequences, and not to the exposure of behavioral and metabolic risk factors.
... In other words, pre-existing attitudes and behavioral intentions commonly induce the actual behavior, so stronger intentions often result in increased efforts to perform the behavior; however, this is not always the case. This theory also acknowledges situations wherein behavioral intentions do not lead to actual behavior due to factors that limit the influence of attitude on behavior [3]. For example, consider an individual wants to purchase a product (i.e., behavioral intensions) but whose bank account does not have a high enough balance to make the purchase. ...
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Building upon the information systems success model (ISSM) and the theory of reasoned action (TRA), we suggest a set of hypotheses related to fintech services consumer adoption, and we use survey data from a sample of consumers in China’s fintech industries to test this framework. We demonstrate three main dimensions of quality in the context of fintech services—i.e., system, information, and service quality—and we find that both consumers’ perceived security and privacy are positively related to consumers’ trust in such services, which in turn encourages the formation of both positive attitudes toward those fintech services and intentions to use. This study sheds new light into fintech services by indicating that, to fully understand the relationships between improving the quality of fintech service, user security and privacy protection, and consumers’ behavioral attitudes and intentions, managers in fintech firms must actively assess the extent to which consumers trust their fintech services, and they must also be able to deal with the challenges posed by consumers’ behavioral uncertainty by implementing an effective trust-enhanced strategy. Through the integration of ISSM and TRA, our findings contribute to an emerging stream of fintech research and extend the literature on trust by providing novel evidence that building strong trust-based relationships with consumers can be particularly beneficial to fintech firms when they want to create positive attitudes in the minds of consumers and thus motivate them to adopt the services.
... Such beliefs are likely to be influenced by social identity dynamics, including shared norms [26]. Law-abiding behaviors and expectations of family members and significant others (e.g., friends) exert an influence over people's decision to adhere to the norms [27]. In other words, shared social identities contribute to shaping individual intention to play out compliant behaviors [28]. ...
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Background The efficacy of public measures for reducing the transmission of the COVID-19 infection relies on citizens’ voluntary adherence with prescribed actions. Drawing on prior literature about compliant behavior, this study aimed to identify factors associated with people engagement in health-protective behaviors by including a conjoint complement of instrumental/self-oriented, normative/community-based, and affective variables.MethodA cross-sectional study involving a non-representative sample of 4045 Italian citizens was carried out during the first stage of the pandemic (April–May 2020). Variables associated with health-protective behaviors were perceived personal and societal concerns and perceived effectiveness of the institutional response to the outbreak (instrumental dimensions), and family and friends perceived norms and sense of community responsibility (normative dimensions). Two negative emotions (anxiety and fear) were included as mediators between personal and societal concerns and outcome behaviors.ResultsResults showed the importance of both self-interest and community-based factors. Indeed, self-interest concerns, family perceived norms, and sense of community responsibility were significant predictors of people’s decisions to engage in health-protective behaviors.Conclusions The research findings show that compliance with public health prescriptions is a multimodal phenomenon and integrating self-interest and community-based factors can offer a better understanding of people’s decision to engage in health-protective behaviors. Further, this study unveils that a shared sense of community is effective in encouraging adherence to recommended behaviors so as behavioral changes can be sustained by targeting the recommendations not only on risk minimization for oneself but also on the allocation of personal responsibility toward the belonging community.
... Drawing from the perspectives of information processing and expected value theory, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) is a theory that explains the general decision-making process that leads to individuals' behavior (Ajzen, 1991;Ajzen & Albarracin, 2007). Researchers have successfully applied the theory to a number of behavior fields, and TPB has been proven to have significant explanatory and predictive power of behavior (Steinmetz et al., 2016). ...
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This study explores how entrepreneurship education and government policies influence the entrepreneurial intention of students receiving higher vocational education. It employs an empirically-based model that tests the effects of perceived entrepreneurial education and perceived entrepreneurial policy on entrepreneurial self-efficacy and entrepreneurial intention. This study also analyzes the moderating effect of gender. The model was constructed based on the Theory of Reasoned Action. A total sample of 462 Chinese students from public and private higher vocational colleges were randomly selected to participate in this study, and their responses were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The results of the research model showed that perceived entrepreneurial education and policy had positive direct influences on entrepreneurial self-efficacy and intention, respectively. Subsequently, students’ entrepreneurial self-efficacy had a direct influence on their entrepreneurial intention. On the other hand, perceived entrepreneurial education and policy had multiple indirect influences on entrepreneurial intention mediated by entrepreneurial self-efficacy in higher vocational education. The findings also showed that gender did not significantly moderate the above direct and indirect causal relationships among the dimensions of the research model. Some implications for building better entrepreneurial community are provided. These include enabling students to obtain knowledge that is closely related to practice and to perceive the value of entrepreneurship education by creating participatory projects and teaching methods, issuing policies that college students care most about, proactively informing students about policy content in a clear and concise way, and fully considering the side effects of government policies and the compatibility among different kinds of policies.
... Drawing from the Reasoned Action Approach, behavior change happens in 3 phases: eliciting relevant beliefs, changing intention by changing those beliefs, and changing behaviour by changing intention [10]. Thus, we obtained pertinent beliefs, which can be modified to change the intention to engage in exercises, thereby changing exercise behaviour. ...
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The overarching purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of health education, media campaigns, and peer counselor training on employees' health. This study also attempted to evaluate the function of tobacco control as a mediator in the relationship between employees' health and health education, media campaigns, and peer counselor training. Data were collected from 440 tobacco industry workers in China using a questionnaire technique. Smart-PLS software and a structural equation modeling (SEM) technique were used to evaluate the data. Employees' health was found to be significantly improved by health education, media campaigns, and peer counselor training. Furthermore, tobacco control was discovered to moderate the association between employee health and health education, media campaigns, and peer counselor training. By analyzing the impact of health education, media campaigns, and peer counselor training on employees' health, this research provided an important theoretical contribution. In terms of practical applications, this study would help employees consuming tobacco to maintain a healthy and safe atmosphere that encourages them to be engaged and perform well. Furthermore, this study could prove effective in resolving difficulties linked to controlling employee tobacco addiction and improving their performance. The tiny sample size of this study, which included solely employees working in the Chinese tobacco sector, was one of its limitations. In addition, future studies can incorporate other constructs to acquire a deeper knowledge of the factors that influence employees' health.
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This dissertation attempts to address the gap in evidence on measurement and validation of behavioral predictors of family planning in Pakistan, and the application of empowerment education strategies for promoting family planning by undertaking three discrete studies embedded within a social franchise (SF) network operated by a local NGO in Pakistan.
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Background Despite a steady decline in adolescent smoking globally, it remains a prevalent risk factor for non-communicable disease. Previous research points to differences in socio-environmental and psychosocial risk factors for smoking and how they vary across different settings with disparate social and cultural characteristics. As a result, smoking rates have remained disproportionately higher in some settings while decreasing in others. This study explored the socio-environmental and psychosocial risk factors for smoking susceptibility in a high-income and upper-middle income setting. Methods Cross-sectional data were obtained from 1,573 male and female adolescents aged 11-15 years who completed self-administered questionnaires in schools in Northern Ireland and Bogotá, Colombia. Using logistic regression analysis, we examined how socio-environmental and psychosocial predictors of smoking susceptibility compared across the two countries. Results In Northern Ireland, reduced odds of smoking susceptibility were significantly associated with less family smoking (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.41-1.00); having access to information about smoking in school (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.59-0.96); negative attitudes towards smoking (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.23-0.51); higher levels of openness (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.50-0.69); and higher levels of self-reported wellbeing (OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.44-0.74). Increased odds of smoking susceptibility were associated with reporting less smoking of a mother (OR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.06-1.76); higher levels of extraversion (OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.90); and receiving pocket money (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.37). In Bogotá, reduced odds of smoking susceptibility were significantly associated with reporting less smoking among friends (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.76-0.98); higher levels of self-efficacy (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.40-0.83); greater perceived behavioural control to quit smoking (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56-0.90); and lower levels of truancy (OR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.92). In Bogotá, no factors were associated with increased odds of smoking susceptibility in the final model. Conclusions The findings illustrate that there were differences in predictors of adolescent smoking susceptibility across the two settings. By using a comparative approach we demonstrate that smoking interventions and policies must be sensitive to the cultural and normative context within which they are implemented.
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Objective: To explain student biology teachers' intention to teach sustainable nutrition (SN) in classes using an extended model of the theory of planned behavior. Design: Germany-wide online questionnaire study in November/December 2019. Participants: A total of 621 student biology teachers (mean age, 23.3 years; SD, 3.9 years; 77% female). Dependent Variable: Intention to teach SN. Independent Variables: Theory of planned behavior variables (attitudes toward teaching, subjective norms, self-efficacy), intention to eat sustainably, attitudes toward SN, knowledge about SN, prior university education for sustainable development experiences. Analyses: Descriptive statistics, bivariate Spearman correlations, and a path model are reported. Results: The extended TPB model provided a moderate-to-high explanation of the intention to teach SN (R² = 0.50; P < 0.001). Respondents with a higher intention to eat sustainably in their daily lives reported more positive attitudes toward teaching, higher self-efficacy, and a higher teaching intention. Prior university education for sustainable development experiences also predicted the intention to teach. A higher level of knowledge about SN was only associated with higher self-efficacy. Conclusions and Implications: Lectures and seminars on SN in biology teacher training may foster student (biology) teachers' self-efficacy in teaching SN and ensure that they understand the importance of their subject-specific commitment, involvement, and attitudes in implementing SN in schools.
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