Article

Efficient Bayesian-based multiview deconvolution

Nature Methods (Impact Factor: 32.07). 04/2014; 11(6). DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2929
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is able to image large specimens with high resolution by capturing the samples from multiple angles. Multiview deconvolution can substantially improve the resolution and contrast of the images, but its application has been limited owing to the large size of the data sets. Here we present a Bayesian-based derivation of multiview deconvolution that drastically improves the convergence time, and we provide a fast implementation using graphics hardware.

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Available from: Fernando Amat, May 21, 2014
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    • "Thanks to the limited photodamage caused by the thin sheet of light at the focal plane, very long acquisitions are possible. To achieve isotropic resolution with good contrast even deep into large specimens like the developing embryo, several rotated 3D views can be acquired on the light-sheet microscope and merged using a multiview deconvolution algorithm postacquisition to provide high information content in all regions of the specimen (Preibisch et al., 2014). Alternatively, near-isotropic resolution can be achieved by two-photon scanned light-sheet microscopy (2P-SPIM) that achieves higher penetration depth than standard light-sheet microscopy at a comparable acquisition speed and photodamage level, by using ultrafast near-infrared laser pulses to create a two-photon excitation light sheet (Truong et al., 2011). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "Thanks to the limited photodamage caused by the thin sheet of light at the focal plane, very long acquisitions are possible. To achieve isotropic resolution with good contrast even deep into large specimens like the developing embryo, several rotated 3D views can be acquired on the light-sheet microscope and merged using a multiview deconvolution algorithm postacquisition to provide high information content in all regions of the specimen (Preibisch et al., 2014). Alternatively, near-isotropic resolution can be achieved by two-photon scanned light-sheet microscopy (2P-SPIM) that achieves higher penetration depth than standard light-sheet microscopy at a comparable acquisition speed and photodamage level, by using ultrafast near-infrared laser pulses to create a two-photon excitation light sheet (Truong et al., 2011). "
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    • "Compared to 3D MV deconvolution, with and without GPU support, we thereby reduced processing times by a factor of up to 25 and 75, respectively (Fig. 1c, Supplementary Table 1), while producing comparable results. We compared the results obtained by our plane-wise deconvolution to the methods commonly used in the light-sheet community, such as established 3D deconvolution (Preibisch et al., 2014), averaging and entropy-based fusion (Preibisch et al., 2010) (Fig. 1d-i). Both averaging and entropy-based fusion were blurry and showed crossshaped artifacts, originating from the elongated PSFs along the optical axes. "
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