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The phenomenology of writing by hand

Abstract

This paper argues that people differ in their underlying orientation to the experience of using writing media. Such differences can be mapped onto a continuum, at one pole of which ‘Planners’ regard writing primarily as a tool to record or communicate ideas whilst at the other extreme ‘Discoverers’ tend to see themselves as engaging with the medium as a way of discovering what they think. This phenomenological dimension may play a subtle, neglected but perhaps important part in influencing writers' preferences for, and sense of ease in using, particular tools.
... Processor) ¢Uƒ°üaedG Qô hC G ,áÑJɵμdG ¢SQGóŸG ' á«∏YÉØH ΩΩóîà°ùJ ∫GõJ ' »àdGh ,ΩΩó≤dG òaee k'ɪ©à°SG ÌcC 'Gh á©FÉ°ûdG Ö«dÉ°SC 'G øe .¢Uƒ°üÿG ¬Lh ≈⋲∏Y ¿OQC 'G 'h ,áeÉY »Hô©dG øWƒdG iƒà°ùe ≈⋲∏Y π«° †ØJ ¤E G ÖJɵμdG ƒYóJ IÒãc k ÉHÉÑ°SC G ∑Éaeg ¿C G (Chandler, 1992) ôdófÉL ôcP óbh ègÉaeŸG áeóN ' ܃°SÉ◊G ∞Xh ÉeóaeY ¬fC G ôcPh ,iôNC G IGOC G øe áHÉàc IGOC G ΩΩGóîà°SG Ö∏ZC G ' ¢UÉN πµμ°ûH áÑ∏£dGh ,ΩΩÉY πµμ°ûH º¡«©é°ûJh ÜÉàµμdG ¬«LƒJ " á«°SGQódG OGƒŸGh ádB 'Gh ábQƒdGh º∏≤dG) ájó«∏≤àdG äGhOC 'G øe k'óH ¢Uƒ°üaedG Qô ΩΩGóîà°SG ≈⋲∏Y ⁄É©dG ∫hO AGôLE Gh ,¬Yƒfh §ÿG ºéM ' ºµμëàdG :πãe IójóY äÓ«¡°ùJ øe ¬eó≤j ÉŸ ,(áÑJɵμdG hC G í°ùŸG hC G Ö£°ûdG ¤E G áLÉ◊G ¿hO AÉ°ûj âbh …C G ' ájQhö †dG äÉë«≤aeàdGh äÓjó©àdG . á«fÉK Iôe áHÉàµμdG IOÉYE G ≈⋲àM k ɪFGO IôaGƒàe á∏«°Sh ¿Gó©j ábQƒdGh º∏≤dG ¿C G (Petrosky, 1990) »µμ°ShÎH ôcPh áfôe á∏«°Sh º∏≤dÉa .∂dP ...
... In Extract 1, typing is opposed to handwriting. Handwriting is both individual and cultural, a product of inculcation and of volition with a corresponding difference between mechanical reproduction and calligraphic design (Chandler 1992 This disinvestment and substitution of gesture has two repercussions. In the first place, digital mediation loses differentiation. ...
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... They reportedly prefer the tactility of the pencil as they play with their ideas and words as textual objects, and their heavy editing keeps them bounded to the text longer; so much so, that they experience a sense of bodily loss when the text is published. In his writings D. Chandler (1992Chandler ( , 1995 explains that the Planners, who favour an architectural conception of their texts, need clarity and structure and leave little to chance. To them, the writing instrument is just that: a tool. ...
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