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How to Augment Simulated Environments by Services Supporting Self-Regulated Learning? A Baseline Study

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Abstract

This paper takes up the concept of self-regulated learning (SRL) and reports results of a baseline study on a simulation for medical training. This study has been conducted to provide benchmark data and evidence of the need for the development of intelligent services for learners, e.g. metacognitive scaffolding. These services aim at augmenting existing simulators in order to close the gap between virtual and real world experiences and to facilitate SRL. Follow-up evaluations on the simulator with integrated services are planned.
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... Wasko (2013) summarizes students' learning outcomes by investigating the enjoyment (motivation, interest, challenging, problem-solving, and critical thinking) they experience during AR exploration. Berthold, Steiner, and Albert (2012) emphasize selfregulated learning skills developed from using AR in project-based medical training, including memorizing, elaboration, organization, planning, self-monitoring, and time management. Mar et al. (2012) suggest the use of AR has satisfied students' needs in supporting learning and motivational elements in both formal and informal exploratory activities. ...
... It assessed students' learning reactions after exploring the location-based information embedded in the system. The structure of the questionnaire items was framed based on theoretical issues addressed in related studies (Bernardos et al., 2011;Berthold et al., 2012;Chang & Liu, 2013;Jaramillo et al., 2010;Mar et al., 2012;Novak et al., 2012;Nurminen, Jarvi, & Lehtonen, 2014) and the needs of users (formative assessment in the prototype version of the system) ( Table 2). The first section of the questionnaire covered basic information about students (gender, college, activities via cell phones, and experiences finding locations). ...
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On the assessment of strategies in self-regulated learning (SRL)-differences in adolescents of different age group and school type
  • R Giordano
  • M Litzenberger
  • M Berthold
R. Fill Giordano, M. Litzenberger and M. Berthold, "On the assessment of strategies in self-regulated learning (SRL)-differences in adolescents of different age group and school type." Poster presented at the 9. Tagung der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Psychologie, Salzburg, Apr. 2010