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Abstract

Flexibility is an ambiguous concept. This book contributes to expounding the importance of clearer concepts in the debates on economic systems, labour markets and work organization. The authors place 'flexibility' in a new theoretical context as juxtaposed to 'stability'. Much terminological confusion and is resolved by this suggestion. © Bengt Furåker, Kristina Håkansson and Jan Ch. Karlsson 2007. Chapters Palgrave Macmillan Ltd 2007. All rights reserved.

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... Flexibility: Flexibility refers to the situation with some variability or changes, and when this variability is expected or desired by the actors or systems, then it is called flexibility, otherwise it denotes inflexibility [22]. ...
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