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Abstract

Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students’ use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook® usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter® remains comparatively low. As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching. Keywords Facebook; Health profession; Internet; Networking; Social media; Student; Twitter

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... Deployment of social media tools in this way enables students to study more efficiently (54), permits rapid and effective communication between users, and facilitates feedback to students from faculty (12,36,50). Furthermore, students who regularly use social media and other learning technologies report higher levels of engagement within the university, an enhanced sense of community (11,31,32,48), and increased confidence/reduced anxiety (40). ...
... These data indicate that the extent of social media integration into medical education is greater than has been previously reported (6,12,22,24,26,28,50,53,54). The reason for such integration most likely lies in the immediacy of responses to questions and/or a lack of instructor accessibility. ...
... Usually, it is very obvious what online resources are most trustworthy i.e. based on the quality of the video, number of view [sic], comments, correlation with previous knowledge from lectures and notes. This latter comment reflects a common student misconception that the number of views, likes, or comments about educational videos on YouTube are reliable indicators of their reliability or usefulness, when in fact no such correlation exists (50). ...
Article
Medical students increasingly utilize social media platforms to supplement their preclinical learning; however, the prevalence of social media use for physiology learning in medical education remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine how first-year medical students from both direct entry medicine and graduate entry medicine interacted with social media as a learning tool by assessing its prevalence, perceived benefits, favored platforms, and reason(s) for its use. Seventy-one percent of surveyed students (out of 139 participants) stated that they interacted with social media in general more than 12 times per week. However, 98% had previously used internet platforms to source physiology information, with 89.2% doing so at least once per week during term. YouTube was the primary source of learning for 76% of students. Significantly, 94% of students indicated that they would first search for answers online if they did not understand something in physiology rather than contacting their instructor in person or by e-mail. However, only 31% of students "fact-checked" physiology information obtained from online sources, by using textbooks, papers, and/or instructors. Our study has revealed that most preclinical medical students utilize social media extensively to study physiology. However, the absence of academic and ethical oversight, paired with students' lack of critical appraisal of possibly inaccurate information, does raise concerns about the overall utility of social media as part of physiology education.
... Indeed, as a result of the popularity and accessibility of SoMe, higher education institutions are increasingly supporting their use by developing SoMe platforms focused on student support, and ensuring compatible software is available for user uptake (Davis et al., 2012;Selwyn, 2012;Richardson, 2015). Many universities have extended this support by developing policies for SoMe use in Higher Education, creating standardized protocols for SoMe in the classroom, and generating professional development guidelines to support academics (Usher et al., 2014;Richardson, 2015). The latter offers opportunities for awarding credit to academics who engage in SoMe activity (Usher et al., 2014). ...
... Many universities have extended this support by developing policies for SoMe use in Higher Education, creating standardized protocols for SoMe in the classroom, and generating professional development guidelines to support academics (Usher et al., 2014;Richardson, 2015). The latter offers opportunities for awarding credit to academics who engage in SoMe activity (Usher et al., 2014). ...
... Twitter is the least commonly used platform of the three by this student population. For those who do participate, students have identified some concerns regarding becoming distracted by Twitter, the potential for increased workload, the limited message length, as well as issues regarding privacy (Tang and Hew, 2017), though the latter is expressed with many SoMe platforms (Cheston et al., 2013;Jaffar, 2013;Usher et al., 2014). Overall, however, the benefits of Twitter appear to outweigh the pitfalls, particularly when it comes to developing an online, collaborative, supportive community. ...
Article
Social media (SoMe) is increasingly used in higher education (HE) to access knowledge and enable global communication. The SoMe platform Twitter® is particularly beneficial in these contexts because it is readily accessible, easily searchable (via hashtags) and global. Given these advantages, the twitter platform @AskAnatomist was created to foster a global weekly tweet chat, where students and academics from can ask and address anatomy-related questions. The aim of this study was to identify themes arising in the early stages of the @AskAnatomy Twitter community to gain insights into current needs/key areas for academic anatomists, students, and other followers. A qualitative analysis of tweets including the hashtag #AnatQ, (the associated @AskAnatomist hashtag), was undertaken to achieve this aim. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes arising in the formative stages of the @AskAnatomist Twitter site: (1) anatomical education modalities, (2) specific anatomy content, and (3) research motivations. These themes reveal controversies within the field of anatomical sciences, areas for potential education resource improvement and research, as well as the humor of anatomists. Though the original intent of the @AskAnatomist site was to engage the general public in anatomy content and knowledge, tweet analysis suggests that academic anatomists were the primary active “tweeters”. Interestingly, this analysis reveals that the @AskAnatomist site progressed into a web-based community of practice (CoP), suggesting an additional benefit of SoMe communities in the field of anatomy.
... Establishing Relationship Taylor et al., 2011;Hinz et al., 2011;Yu, Duan, & Cao, 2013;Hawkins & Vel, 2013;Usher et al., 2014;Zeng & Gerritsen, 2014;Chen, Kim, & Lin, 2015;Dwivedi et al., 2015;Zhu & Chen, (2015;Lee, et al., 2015) ...
... Kozinets et al., 2010;Coulter & Roggeveen, 2012;Kumar et al., 2013;Yu, Duan, & Cao, 2013;Munar & Jacobsen, 2013;Kim et al., 2014;Zeng & Gerritsen, 2014;Viglia et al., 2016;Teng et al., 2017. Taylor et al., 2011;Hinz et al., 2011;Yu, Duan, & Cao, 2013;Hawkins & Vel, 2013;Usher et al., 2014;Zeng & Gerritsen, 2014;Chen, Kim, & Lin, 2015;Dwivedi et al., 2015;Zhu & Chen, 2015;Lee, et al., 2015;Abed et al., 2015;Alalwan et al., 2016;Rathore et al., 2016;Algharabat et al., 2017. Social media enable and empower word of mouth, market value of firms and businesses, supplementary sales, eliciting strong feelings among users, Important part of People's daily life, influential and efficient implications on people's lives, ...
Article
The increased usage of social media forced the brands to integrate social media in their marketing communication channel, as it becomes the need of the hour, as it determines overall brand identity, brand image, and company performance in the present marketing competition. This research aimed to track the evolution and advancement of the IMC concept, and how it reformed the way of marketing communications. Moreover, the study highlights the importance of social media, as how it can influence consumer behavior in a substantial way. The study developed a theoretical framework through systematic review in the context that serve to integrate the existing conceptual framework of IMC with social media (SM) that is also called consumer generated media (CGM) and offer implications for understanding the manifestation as a tool of augmentation for marketing practice. The present study reviews and explains the liaison between social media/consumer generated media and IMC through enhanced IMC outcomes in the modern-day marketing communication approach. The findings of the study serve as a springboard for future research and applications in the field of marketing mix, in order to build strong foundations of the brand physically as well as virtually in the mind of customers.
... As one student commented in the open-ended section: "I tend to only use online resources as a secondary source of information or to consolidate learning." Previous findings have also indicated that despite the trend toward increased online resource use by healthcare professionals, including for physiology learning, traditional resources such as lectures and recommended textbooks remain the most popular among students (2,12,13,37,41,42). ...
... Therefore, the present findings demonstrate that despite most students not trusting online resources, efforts to ensuring the accuracy of those sources by students are comparatively low. Furthermore, previous studies indicated that even when assessing the quality of online video clips viewers used unreliable indicators that do not reflect the quality of information presented such as number of views or likes the video has (42,50,62,63). Hence, students tended to use the most easily accessible resources rather than the most reliable ones (51,62,63). ...
Article
Online resources are becoming increasingly important in undergraduate education and have been associated with a number of advantages and positive outcomes on students' learning experience. However, online resource use by veterinary students for physiology learning remains poorly understood. Thus the present questionnaire-based study aims to investigate the extent to which first- and second-year veterinary students use online resources, including online video clips and social media, in their physiology learning and if this is influenced by factors of age, gender, entry status, or year of study. One-hundred and twenty-two students across seven UK universities completed the survey. Traditional resources (the lecturer and recommended textbooks) were the most preferred sources for physiology learning. Nonetheless, 97.5% of students used Internet search engines to explore physiology topics. Furthermore, students' tendency to contact their instructor regarding a physiology question was low. Rather, 92.6% said they would first search for an answer online. Particularly popular was the use of online video clips with 91.1% finding them valuable for physiology learning and 34.21% finding them more useful for understanding physiology than university taught material or lecture slides. YouTube was the most common online video clip platform used by students. Most students stated that they would enjoy interacting with course materials on an instructor-led social media page, but only 33.9% currently use social media to discuss physiology-related issues with classmates. Additionally, most students expressed concerns regarding the reliability of online resources but attempts to fact-check these resources were relatively low. Therefore, online resources represent an essential part of veterinary students' physiology learning and this suggests that educators can significantly improve student engagement and understanding of physiology by integrating these resources.
... Teenagers are regular users of social media platforms such as WhatsApp, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat and TikTok, and most of them own smartphones (Ofcom 2019). Thus, as nursing students begin their programmes of study, most are already engaged with an online social network (Usher et al 2014, Terzi et al 2019. However, the network, style and responsibility of communication expected of a nursing student differs from that expected of a private individual (Green 2017 (NMC 2018a(NMC , 2019, and therefore the NMC's (2016) social media guidance, but are held to account by their education provider and practice partners rather than the NMC itself. ...
... There is evidence that students' use of Twitter to engage with course material and in course-related discussions can increase their marks (Junco et al 2011, Buzzelli et al 2016. Nursing students also use social media to source information, with Usher et al's (2014) study suggesting that this is often used in preference to journals. ...
Article
E-professionalism is defined as the competence and values expected of professionals when engaged in online communication, and is a rapidly expanding area of nursing practice. The use of online social media is popular among nursing students, some of whom have created online platforms for peer support and influence. There are significant benefits of using social media for nursing students, such as developing professional networks, engaging in the nursing community, accessing and providing support, and enhancing their knowledge. However, nursing students must be made aware of the potential risks in relation to how they share information and communicate online. These risks include misconduct investigations and could result in exclusion from their studies, resulting in them being unable to join the professional register. Nursing students and educators should be supported to use digital technologies in a way that capitalises on their benefits, while minimising their risks. This article aims to enhance nursing students' and nurses' understanding of e-professionalism so that they can use social media effectively for peer support and to enhance patient care.
... As mentioned in the literature, the use of social media for health sciences students' training has been researched. However, this research is scarce and much more so when we focus on nursing students [1][2][3][4][5]. It may be partly due to the time it took the nursing discipline to integrate social media into training [6,7], as early studies on this subject reflected that nursing students indicated their preference for learning following the traditional teaching method [3]. ...
... The bibliography consulted coincides in pointing to Facebook and YouTube as the social media most used by students [3,5]. Although our sample used both social media, Instagram is the social site most used by our participants. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Social media platforms are integrated into the lives of students. Their use in education has been studied, but this research is scarce in nursing. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the questionnaire "Use and views of the social media for nursing education" through a pilot study, to describe the use and attitudes of nursing students to social media. Methods: Cross-sectional design to validate the modified scale "Students' Use and Views of the Social Media questionnaire." The sample consisted of 107 undergraduate nursing students. Results: The factor analysis extracted three main components to explain social media use for nursing education, with component 1 being the "Need to use media in my professional training," component 2-"To deepen my professional knowledge" and component 3 "Contrast information." High reliability was demonstrated with Chronbach's alpha value (0.84). Conclusion: The final tool was proven to have high validity and reliability values, so it is positioned as a viable tool to explore this reality. Students use social media for education in a high proportion and have positive attitudes regarding their education inclusion.
... However, the majority of respondents recognise the importance of integrating social media into healthcare care, as it has been found that 55.8% of respondents are willing to undertake social media-related training. 12 Both studies 11,12 are characterised by a lack of theoretical grounding and the absence of consumer perception concerning the usage of social media in healthcare. ...
... However, the majority of respondents recognise the importance of integrating social media into healthcare care, as it has been found that 55.8% of respondents are willing to undertake social media-related training. 12 Both studies 11,12 are characterised by a lack of theoretical grounding and the absence of consumer perception concerning the usage of social media in healthcare. ...
Article
Full-text available
This research identifies the underlying drivers impacting on health consumers' social media usage and acceptance behaviours using technology acceptance model (TAM) as the theoretical lens. A cross-sectional survey of 265 health consumers was conducted through a mall intercept technique. Participants in the survey were over the age of 18 and had access to a public or private healthcare service provider. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The major findings show that perceived ease of use, privacy threat, information quality, social influence and self-efficacy influence health consumers' social media adoption behaviours. Perceived usefulness was not found to affect health consumers' social media adoption behaviours. The moderation analysis showed that influences of privacy threats are non-significant for mature age respondents and non-frequent users of social media. This study's findings have important implications for designing social media strategies for the healthcare industry. The drivers that positively impact on health consumers' social media usages can be integrated into meaningful strategies to capture the attention of potential consumers. They need to be educated, informed and engaged as health consumers so that they employ social media effectively to their advantage.
... This really changes the nature of our interactions either with our friends or with private and public organizations. Indeed, social media platforms represent a new place where people, organizations, and even governments can commercially, socially, politically, and educationally interact with each other and exchange information, thoughts, products, and services (Hawkins and Vel, 2013;Rathore, Ilavarasan, & Dwivedi, 2016;Usher et al., 2014;Zeng and Gerritsen, 2014;Zhu and Chen, 2015). Consequently, organizations worldwide have started thinking about how using these platforms could help in attracting customers and building a profitable marketing relationship with those customers (Alalwan, Rana, Algharabat, & Tarhini, 2016;Braojos-Gomez, Benitez-Amado, & Llorens-Montes, 2015;Kamboj, Sarmah, Gupta, & Dwivedi, 2018;Lin and Kim, 2016;Oh, Bellur, & Sundar, 2015). ...
Article
Social media is being increasingly used as a platform to conduct marketing and advertising activities. Organizations have spent a lot of time, money, and resources on social media ads. However, there is always a challenge in how organizations can design social media advertising to successfully attract customers and motivate them to purchase their brands. Thus, this study aims to identify and test the main factors related to social media advertising that could predict purchase intention. The conceptual model was proposed based on three factors from the extending Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) (performance expectancy, hedonic motivation, and habit) along with interactivity, informativeness, and perceived relevance. The data was collected using a questionnaire survey of 437 participants. The key results of structural equation modelling (SEM) largely supported the current model’s validity and the significant impact of performance expectancy, hedonic motivation, interactivity, informativeness, and perceived relevance on purchase intentions. This study will hopefully provide a number of theoretical and practical guidelines on how marketers can effectively plan and implement their ads over social media platforms.
... Through Instagram students find many ideas, design patterns and how students work as beginners sometimes have problems in starting designs and finding ideas. So using Instagram students is very helpful in finding design ideas, including in assessing the design [50] communication constraints of students and teachers in learning can be overcome by the use of social media [51], students can learn anywhere and anytime to hone their cognitive skills and knowledge towards high learning outcomes [25]. ...
Article
Full-text available
span lang="EN-US">Mobile phone technology offers new opportunities to integrate face-to-face learning also other models of learning. Instagram is mostly only used for business and public figure exposure. But we see a tendency to use Instagram that students use in learning graphic design as a way to access content, publish work and learning outcomes using mobile phone. The purpose of this study is to find out the comparison of the average value of In-diagram assisted creative learning and measure the user experience (UX) of Instagram in learning graphic design. This study uses a quantitative approach with a pseudo experiment of non equivalent control group de-sign to find a comparison of the average value of student learning outcomes in the Statistical Test with MANOVA and to find out the average value of UX with UEQ Instagram benchmarks for learning graphic design. The results of the study there are significant differences (real) the average value between the experimental class group and the control class group. UX test results are on four scales that are categorized as ex-excellent, namely the scale of Attractiveness, efficiency, dependability, stimulation. One perspicuity scale is above average and the novelty scale is good, the mean range is 1.33-2.00 according to the UEQ benchmark interval. The implication of this research is that Instagram through mobile phone technology is effectively used for the creative learning of graphic design lessons and needs to be developed as a medium for the development of teaching materials on all subject matter.</span
... Providing healthcare services through internet and social media sites will gradually become widespread. The majority of students who study health-related subjects use social media platforms in various ways (Jones et al., 2016;Price et al., 2018;Usher et al., 2014). Most nursing students consider themselves competent enough to discuss nursing education on social media. ...
Article
With the advancement of technology, social media use increases day by day, especially among university students. This descriptive and correlational research was conducted with the aim of investigating attitudes of nursing and midwifery students towards social media in terms of certain variables. The population of the research comprised students studying at the nursing and midwifery department of a health college (N = 336), and the sample of the research constituted students who were chosen using accidental sampling from the population (n = 254). A Student Information Form and the Social Media Attitude Scale were used for data collection. It was identified that 73% of the students studied nursing and 64.2% used social media for various reasons. The averages scores for total score, social competence, need for sharing, relationship with the teachers, and social isolation dimensions of Social Media Attitude Scale were found as 72.19 ± 10.92 (23–115), 14.17 ± 4.87 (6–30), 27.65 ± 6.08 (8–40), 7.50 ± 3.20 (3–15), and 13.14 ± 5.01 (6–30), respectively. It was observed that nursing and midwifery students had positive attitudes towards social media. Furthermore, although the personal characteristics of students do not affect their attitudes towards social media, the features of social media have a statistically significant effect on students attitudes towards social media.
... Our study was conducted among first-year medical students only. Among them, 86% were finding it useful and 16% were regular users [10]. ...
... There is a growing body of evidence that suggests social media leads to enhanced student engagement through ongoing feedback (D'Souza et al. 2017;Usher et al. 2014). The use of Facebook to complement course content delivery encourages more frequent, active participation and feedback from students , throughout the class. ...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced health educators to adapt quickly to teaching and supporting students online. Social media platforms – of which Facebook is presently the most popular worldwide–has demonstrated its utility in facilitating online learning and fostering student support. In order for educators to get the most out of the platform, they should consider adopting a systematic and evidence-based approach. This article draws upon current literature and the authors’ experiences to offer practical tips for health educators wanting to use Facebook as a learning platform and support tool for their students. We offer twelve tips, organized into prescriptive steps for creating and managing a Facebook group, and suggestions for utilizing Facebook’s features to foster student learning, collaboration, communication, and socialization.
... There is mounting evidence on the positive use of SNSs in education especially among learners (Tess, 2013;Greenhow and Askari, 2017;Sadowski et al., 2017;Kurkela, 2011;Maloney et al., 2014;Junco et al., 2011;Peck, 2014;Wang et al., 2012b;Usher et al., 2014;Gikas and Grant, 2013). These studies can be summarised and categorised under the following themes: ...
Article
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This study aims to explore how learners and educators use social networking sites (SNSs) for education-related activities and identify the factors that influence their usage. The study was conducted at a private institute for higher learning (IHL) in central Malaysia involving learners at different levels of study and educators from various positions. A total of 200 respondents consisting of 100 learners and 100 educators participated in the self-administered questionnaire. Chi-square and regression analyses were used to determine the significance of demographic factors (education and gender) and other factors such as perceived privacy (PP), perceived security (PS), perceived trust (PT), web experience (WE), computer anxiety (CA), social norms (SN), enjoyment (ET), desire to give information (GV) and desire to get information (GT) towards their intention to use SNSs. The findings illustrate that other than external factors, demograp
... Social media technologies have become a common method for producing and conserving social relationships [48]. Even though it is supposed that most the nursing students remarkably use social media, the role of it in nursing education has not been thoroughly investigated [55]. So that it is necessary to use social media to decrease stress among nursing student, in first year or first semester, their aged (20 and 24 years) because they do not have experience in health specialties, it is very important to reduce student load and the academic activities, and providing training of nursing students with the reality of their future profession. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: nowadays increasing use of Social media within the nursing study and practice the students should realize its use is attractive in the educational setting. The aim of the study: This study was aimed to assess direction and satisfaction of medical, surgical nursing students in the first year towards using social media for communication & study Subjects and methods: descriptive design utilized to conduct this study. Sitting: The study was held in the medical, surgical department faculty of nursing (1st year) in which student start studying nursing to verify no any factor affecting them. Tools for data collection: The constructed study tools tested, and piloted by the investigator to collect data through two electronic tools. The first tool:-include two parts, part (1) student personnel data and part (2) the direction of students towards social media. The second tool, student satisfaction about using social media in nursing studying. Results: the result showed that most of the students prefer using of social media in their learning and they have positive direction toward using it, positively agreement of most of the students in using the social media in interactivity with peers and the agreement for most of them which refer to satisfaction by using it in academic learning and most of students were satisfied toward using of social media in their learning. Conclusion: Social media is a rising scope within nursing practice, and students can find its use engaging in the educational setting. The current study concluded that most of the students were agree and they satisfied to use of social media in their learning, interactivity with peers, teachers, and they agree of easy use and usefulness of it. In the same time, they prefer the presence of teachers.
... Student browse social media as a valid forum for learning and to get information for health. Students engage regularly in social media to remain aware of health information [6]. Regular physical activities is related to important health benefits, but abundant usage of social media leads to decay in student's physical activity. ...
Conference Paper
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In the present world of technology, social media is used to communicate, share information or linked within the Global field of the world. In this research, to find out the physical, psychological & sexual health impact by using social media is focused. Social Networking websites have an adverse influence on students' lives and students browse social websites and got to know some complex stuff before their age. Purposive sampling technique was used in this research and questionnaire was administered from 300 students to collect the data using survey. According to research findings, there is no association between social media and students Health. The main reason was that students were addicted to browsing of social media, even they do not aware of suffering from the bundle of physical and psychological health issues. They also browse to get health-related information which may be prohibited stuff like sexual health. Some hackers also use students as a tool to diverse their belief as pupils spend most of their time using social media. Lastly, it is stated that Social Media is like a "DEEP OCEAN", which have an intense impact on students from each aspect of their lives.
... Social media technologies have become a common method for producing and conserving social relationships [48]. Even though it is supposed that most the nursing students remarkably use social media, the role of it in nursing education has not been thoroughly investigated [55]. So that it is necessary to use social media to decrease stress among nursing student, in first year or first semester, their aged (20 and 24 years) because they do not have experience in health specialties, it is very important to reduce student load and the academic activities, and providing training of nursing students with the reality of their future profession. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: nowadays increasing use of Social media within the nursing study and practice the students should realize its use is attractive in the educational setting. The aim of the study: This study was aimed to assess direction and satisfaction of medical, surgical nursing students in the first year towards using social media for communication & study Subjects and methods: descriptive design utilized to conduct this study. Sitting: The study was held in the medical, surgical department faculty of nursing (1st year) in which student start studying nursing to verify no any factor affecting them. Tools for data collection: The constructed study tools tested, and piloted by the investigator to collect data through two electronic tools. The first tool:- include two parts, part (1) student personnel data and part (2) the direction of students towards social media. The second tool, student satisfaction about using social media in nursing studying. Results: the result showed that most of the students prefer using of social media in their learning and they have positive direction toward using it, positively agreement of most of the students in using the social media in interactivity with peers and the agreement for most of them which refer to satisfaction by using it in academic learning and most of students were satisfied toward using of social media in their learning. Conclusion: Social media is a rising scope within nursing practice, and students can find its use engaging in the educational setting. The current study concluded that most of the students were agree and they satisfied to use of social media in their learning, interactivity with peers, teachers, and they agree of easy use and usefulness of it. In the same time, they prefer the presence of teachers.
... Many health professionals, including mental health nurses, have joined that conversation. There are numerous examples where nurses have found Twitter to be a useful way to communicate with each other, undertake self-directed learning, and to share information and resources (Bell 2017;Morley & Chinn 2014;Smith & Watson 2016;Usher et al. 2014;Wilson et al. 2014). Twitter, along with other social media platforms, has also been used as a health education teaching tool in some instances (Ferguson et al. 2014;Gree et al. 2014;Lopez & Cleary 2018). ...
... Social Media such as You Tube, Wikipedia, Snap Chat and Google allows easy access of information due to wide sharing; finding solutions or how-to instructions; extracting opinions; comprehensibility and convenience alongside or even over traditional information sources(Head, & Eisenburg, 2010;Kim, Sin & Yoo-Lee, 2014;Usher, Woods, Casellac, Glass, Wilson, Mayner & Irwin, 2014).Social media supplements information gaps as well as misunderstood information, as this student explained:"In general for example in my life what I didn't know about it, I put in YouTube because there's lots of videos that showing step by step. So it will be perfect that we'll know anything in the world just you Google it and it will explain in brief, even the courses that we take in the Master even from outside the country." ...
Article
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Upon transitioning to higher education, Emirati students bring their cultural values and sentiments into the teaching and learning environment. Using the Explanatory Sequential method of Mixed Methods approach, this research explored how the information use of Emirati students enrolled in higher education is experienced in light of what is revealed when national culture is explored. This research provides empirical data contributing to the discussion of how culture intersects with information use in higher education. New contributions underpin the relationship between culture and information use. They also support the design and implementation of pedagogical approaches that recognize cultural diversity of learners.
... Once again, these results are insufficient for drawing conclusions. Various investigations show the key role played by SM in the expansion of knowledge (Hamm et al., 2013) and the importance of SM as a source of information in comparison to, for example, peer-reviewed journals (Usher et al., 2014). In the case of medical residents, we need to know how they search for information and what SM they are using. ...
Article
Background Medical residents can offer ideas for new information services, as most of them are ‘digital natives’, although reviews of the use of social media in health care settings do not provide data on their information behaviour. Objective A scoping review aimed at providing a research map for the information behaviour of medical residents and their use of social media, listing the aspects of the information behaviour studied and the theories and methods used. Methods A search was carried out in pubmed, embase, cinahl and lisa in April of 2018, with the results limited to the period from 2010 onwards. Results Thirty‐nine relevant articles from 38 different studies were identified. The presence and use of social media was the most researched aspect, followed by information sharing, the relationships established and, finally, the search for and use of information. These aspects are researched mainly from the point of view of doctor–patient interactions. Only one study incorporated a theory of its design. Surveys were the most frequently used method. Conclusion Research does not delve into medical residents’ information behaviour on social media, despite the residents themselves using these media (in the context of everyday life, at least). More research is required.
... It is, in turn, their social media choice positively reflects people's orientations and behaviors regarding various social media applications [2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7]. Therefore, social media applications have been assessed as one of the influential things which are progressively involved in any aspect of human lives [2,4,6,8,9,10,11,12]. ...
... The most widely used social platforms in medical education are the blogs [2], furthermore social media platform has positively and hugely influenced the domain of medical education and healthcare delivery evidenced byways trainees communicate, exchange ideas, interact, learn evidenced-informed practice and promote healthy scholarship and result-oriented clinical practice [3,4]. Effective communication is the life wire of good clinical practice; hence, social media facilitate instant communication and prompt feedback and reply from colleagues and tutors, thereby improving productivity in the clinical arena (5,6]. The speed of feedback and response is said to be the power of social media, as reported by Hennessy et al. 2016 [7], complementing existing tools. ...
Article
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There is a huge focus on social and other forms of digital media at present revolutionising learning and teaching methods however other traditional forms such as printed media are well known in assisting educators. Social media applied within medical education is an example of the application of educational media in practice. Instant messaging application has the inherent capacity to facilitate communication within the hospital community and therefore enhancing learning opportunities. WhatsApp has become very popular is some aspect of medical education and clinical practice however in paediatrics and child health dedicated WhatsApp use is still emerging. This narrative review examines enhancing WhatsApp use in paediatrics specialty training. While the innovative technology of WhatsApp social media platform is highly impressive tool to motivate, augment learning, also applaud as evidenced by it use in our paediatric unit as educational and communication tool ultimately impacting on patients care and healthcare delivery but in its current form WhatsApp is said to be unsafe to handle patient data and is inappropriate for use in a clinical environment but further research needed to ascertain its safety in a clinical environment.
... Social media technologies have become popular means for creating and maintaining social relationships, but although it is assumed that the majority of nursing students frequently use social media, the role of social media in nursing education has not been fully explored (Usher et al., 2014). Social media forums are used by students to discuss academic problems, but also as a resource for emotional support: students share their experiences in class and in their clinical placements and receive feedback on stressful events from their peers (Tower et al., 2015;Duke et al., 2017). ...
Article
Caring is seen as an essential part of nursing and as a desirable competency expected of nursing students. Yet, students have difficulties in understanding the meaning and practice of caring relationships. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between perceived social support and peer caring behaviors to nurse students' caring perceptions. A cross-sectional study was conducted among first and fourth-year nursing students (n = 246) attending a Baccalaureate nursing education program at a major university in Israel. The findings revealed first-year students significantly received more social support from family and friends than fourth-year students. Moreover, first-year students reported an increase in the use of social support through social media platforms during their first semester of studies. Social support from family, peers and social media platforms was associated to caring perception. Fourth-year students scored higher than first-year students in their caring perceptions and peer caring behaviors. Educators should consider the growing potential role of social media technologies as an accessible source of social support and as a learning tool. Moreover, nurse educators should encourage the use and practice of peer caring behaviors among students as professional means of facilitating future caring relationships with patients and their families.
... Social Media such as You Tube, Wikipedia, Snap Chat and Google allows easy access of information due to wide sharing; finding solutions or how-to instructions; extracting opinions; comprehensibility and convenience alongside or even over traditional information sources(Head, & Eisenburg, 2010;Kim, Sin & Yoo-Lee, 2014;Usher, Woods, Casellac, Glass, Wilson, Mayner & Irwin, 2014).Social media supplements information gaps as well as misunderstood information, as this student explained:"In general for example in my life what I didn't know about it, I put in YouTube because there's lots of videos that showing step by step. So it will be perfect that we'll know anything in the world just you Google it and it will explain in brief, even the courses that we take in the Master even from outside the country." ...
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This research investigated the cultural dimensions of information use of post graduate Emirati students. The purpose was to explore how information use is experienced in light of what is revealed when national culture is explored. A mixed methods approach was employed with two distinct phases. Phase One was quantitative in focus, and used Hofstede's Values Survey Module to gain an understanding of the cultural dimensions of a Master cohort of Emiratis studying at a number of Federal College campuses throughout the United Arab Emirates (UAE). To further understand if the values and sentiments inherent in the cultural dimensions were part of their information use, qualitative interviews were followed up with these male and female students in Phase Two. The relational approach to information literacy was used to understand the relationship between users and their information worlds. A mixed methods approach was used because each data set (qualitative and quantitative) is able to inform the other and provide authentic checks and balances for consideration. Two distinct phenomena were explored in this research-information use and culture. Therefore this complex integrative exploration was better served by using mixed methods approach. The overarching research question guiding the study is-What are the cultural dimensions of information use among Postgraduate Emirati students? Two sub questions are then used to guide each phase of the mixed methods research: 1. What are the cultural dimensions of Emirati Postgraduate students? 2. What is the relationship between these cultural dimensions and the students' information use? Insights emerged deductively when the data was analysed thematically. The data revealed that when this group of students used information, the following cultural dimensions of information use were noted: • Personified information; • Information for personal needs ii The cultural dimensions of information use among Emirati postgraduate students • Information for personal improvement • Ambiguous information (acceptable in spoken situations) • Using information purposefully • Enjoyment in the information use flow • Information contributors. The UAE is slowly accumulating academic research contextually related to the country. However, at times there was not enough written academic resources to support the information use for these Masters Students studying at an applied level. As a result, this cohort had to use alternative ways of finding and using information to support their dissertation work. These students faced challenges such as a lack of written academic resources, studying in their second language and only gaining their confidence as researchers later in their educational experience. Persevering through these challenges steered them to finding information through alternate routes like industry professionals. Ultimately they were rewarded with growing confidence as researchers and enjoyable encounters with new information. More importantly these experiences have compelled these students to contributing to the knowledge economy of the UAE. This research is significant because a relational approach to using information is not explicitly focussed on when Emirati students access information. The findings will guide information professionals working in the UAE or with Emirati students abroad. It will advise organisations who are committed to researching the knowledge economy of the UAE. It will raise awareness in Emirati higher education students to embrace their information use experiences, build confidence in their research approach and honour their country by their contributions to national information.
... Despite this, the use of social media for the purposes of education continues to grow, with some reports suggesting up to 52% of health profession students use online media as their primary source of information. 5 Therefore, consideration of both the factors that continue to drive student use of these platforms is warranted along with strategies to remedy its shortcomings. ...
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The ubiquitous nature of social media has meant that its effects on fields outside of social communication have begun to be felt. The generation undergoing medical education are of the generation referred to as “digital natives”, and as such routinely incorporate social media into their education. Social media’s incorporation into medical education includes its use as a platform to distribute information to the public (“distributive education”) and as a platform to provide information to a specific audience (“push education”). These functions have proved beneficial in many regards, such as enabling constant access to the subject matter, other learners, and educators. However, the usefulness of using social media as part of medical education is limited by the vast quantities of poor quality information and the time required to find information of sufficient quality and relevance, a problem confounded by many student’s preoccupation with “efficient” learning. In this Perspective, the authors discuss whether social media has proved useful as a tool for medical education. The current growth in the use of social media as a tool for medical education seems to be principally supported by students’ desire for efficient learning rather than by the efficacy of social media as a resource for medical education. Therefore, improvements in the quality of information required to maximize the impact of social media as a tool for medical education are required. Suggested improvements include an increase in the amount of educational content distributed on social media produced by academic institutions, such as universities and journals.
... This data was interesting to contrast with (Cathala et al., 2021) study that showed BII were messaging mostly when on duty in clinical practice. However, Usher et al. (2014) showed that participants' preferred primary source of information was online media. A generational difference was identified in SoMe use while studying, with younger generations using SoMe the most for this purpose. ...
Article
Background Students use social media for sharing information and connecting with their friends, also for peer support, peer learning and student engagement. Research indicates that approximately twice the number of students were using social media for educational purposes compared to academic staff and almost all students discuss academic issues on social media. However, little is known about how diverse cohorts of student nurses use social media for specific purposes at different stages of their learning. Objectives Identify how student nurses in each country of study use social media for learning. Identify how each generation of student nurses use social media for learning. Identify how student nurses use social media as their education progresses. Design A cross-sectional survey. Settings The study was undertaken across three countries Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and the UK. Participants Student nurses from each of the countries that consented to participate met the inclusion criteria. Methods 1050 student nurses across the three countries self-completed the cross-sectional survey between March and September 2019. Data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results WhatsApp® was the most used platform for learning amongst participants. Watching videos and downloading articles represented two-thirds of social media usage for learning. Smart phones were the most used device to access social media. Kruskal-Wallis tests were significant (≤0.001) for checking social media and messaging in lecture, use of social media for studies and classroom activities by country, generation (except classroom activities) and year of education. Use of social media for classroom activities had no significance by generation. Conclusion Country, generation and year of education are factors that influence the use of social media in student nurses' learning. These should be considered by Universities in curriculum development and in teaching and learning delivery. From a pragmatic approach, social media is available and used by a majority of student nurses and can be widely assimilated into the nursing curriculum.
... While e-professionalism has been studied amongst students, limited studies have explored the social media use of nurses and midwives who are already practising. Amongst health professionals, social media use is common Pizzuti et al., 2020;Surani et al., 2017;Usher et al., 2014;Wang et al., 2019). In their cross-sectional study of North American health professionals' perceptions of social media as an educational tool, Pizzuti et al. (2020) reported differences in participants' perceptions and use of social media by age and profession. ...
Article
Aim To describe nurses’ and midwives’ social media use, knowledge, attitudes and information needs, in the context of e-professionalism. A secondary aim was to identify any relationship between these variables and age, or professional role. Background Midwives and nurses are viewed by the public as trusted professionals. On social media, the boundary between professional and personal identities can be blurred. Previous research has explored how student nurses navigate professional behaviour online, or e-professionalism. However, confusion persists amongst established nurses and midwives, despite the policies which guide and regulate their online conduct. Design A cross-sectional designwas applied. The STROBE guideline informed reporting of the findings. Methods A validated survey tool was modified to the study setting. Responses to 17 survey items were analysed using Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on responses to two open-ended questions. Results In total, 311 nurses and midwives from one Western Australian tertiary hospital participated between August 2019 and February 2020. Social media use was widespread (97.4%, n = 299). Associations were identified between age group and eight survey items assessing social media use, knowledge and attitudes. No associations were identified between professional role and social media use, knowledge and attitudes. Content analysis revealed five themes: Maintaining professional boundaries; Avoidance; Protecting self; Responsibilities and consequences; and Social media as a tool. Conclusions Midwives and nurses in this study approached social media with caution yet many were curious about its potential. If midwives and nurses are to be held accountable to social media policies and use the benefits social media affords, they must be supported to evolve into proficient users by educators and policy makers. Tweetable abstract Nurses and midwives must be supported through policy and education to embrace social media as a tool of the future.
... A high proportion of healthcare professionals use social media for personal use. [5][6][7] Others consider social media, especially Facebook and Twitter, as a tool for professional development, as a means of accessing information, marketing practices and services, job opportunities, as well as sharing or adding your opinion on issues of interest to you and to other like-minded individuals online. 8,9 However, other social media research has been conducted that has implications for the profession and the patient-practitioner relationship. ...
Article
Patricia Neville describes the first study to investigate the incidence of social media Fitness to Practise (FtP) cases investigated by the GDC since it established social media guidelines in 2013. Introduction Since 2013, all General Dental Council (GDC) registrants’ online activities have been regulated by the GDC's social media guidelines. Failure to comply with these guidelines results in a Fitness to Practise (FtP) complaint being investigated. Aims This study explores the prevalence of social media related FtP cases investigated by the GDC from 1 September 2013 to 21 June 2016. Method Documentary analysis of social media related FtP cases published on the GDC's website was undertaken. All cases that met the study's inclusion criteria were analysed using a quantitative content analysis framework. Findings It was found that 2.4% of FtP cases published on the GDC website during that period were related to breaches of the social media guidelines. All of the cases investigated were proven and upheld. Most of those named in the complaints were dental nurses and the most common type of complaint was inappropriate Facebook comments. Conclusions The low incidence rate should be interpreted with caution, being illustrative of the types of issues that might arise rather than the volume. The GDC will need to remain vigilant in this area and ensure that social media awareness training is an active part of CPD for all the dental team.
... The e-Learning Centre (i-LeC) of Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) was established in December 2005 as one of the university's efforts to embark on e-learning activities. The centre acts as the core unit in initiating and implementing e-learning on a campuswide level that aims to comprehensively train and equip all academic staff to create online source of information (Bahner et al., 2012;Rung et al., 2014;Usher et al., 2014); the decision why the Malaysian dental students use social media as a source of information for academic purposes among them is still indistinct. Therefore, the present study was conducted to examine the use of social media application among dental students for academic purposes. ...
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Educational landscape has changed drastically over the past decades with the integration of technology to support the role of educators. The objectives of this study were to examine the use of social media application among dental students and to investigate significant demographic variables with regard to social media use for academic purposes. All dental students across all academic years were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire (content validated, pre-tested) survey conducted online via Google Forms. Overall response rate was 67.8%. Of the 244 respondents, 99.1% owned smartphones, with a majority of them were iPhone and Android users. Notably, 91.4% of the respondents had access to internet data via a third generation (3G) mobile carrier and WiFi connection. A majority of the respondents (97.1%) used social media to communicate or connect with friends whereas 5.7% of them used it for business purposes. There was no significant association between gender, year of study and type of internet access with the mean of social media usage for academic purposes (p > 0.05). Most of the respondents preferred YouTube (74.6%) and Google (73.7%) for seeking information in their study. In conclusion, we found that majority of respondents had acknowledged the importance of social media in education. Our findings suggest the potential value of integrating social media in teaching and learning activities to enhance students’ learning experience.
... As universidades poderiam maximizar a oportunidade de recorrer a estas ferramentas e preparar os alunos no uso apropriado dos meios de comunicação social, através da contratação de aprendizagem usando essas plataformas dado o rápido ritmo de mudança das TIC. 16 No Canadá, a escola médica da Universidade de Alberta possui um curso de curta duração sobre o uso das mídias sociais entre os estudantes na Universidade que tem propiciado um aumento no uso de plataforma como o Facebook por estudantes e professores dentro do curso médico. 17 Ao considerar o uso educacional na Odontologia, identificou-se como maior funcionalidade a obtenção de material didático a partir do Facebook. ...
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Introduction: social networks play a fundamental role in the way young people perceive and relate to other people, the world and information. Is it possible to use the information and communications technologies present in everyday life as learning tools in school life? Objective: evaluate the opinion of dental students from the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil, about the use of social networks -Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp- as facilitators in biosafety training. Methods: the study sample was the students attending the course Biosafety and Ergonomics 2 (n= 53), who filled in a Google electronic form evaluating the adherence, applicability and usefulness of social networks as educational platforms. Results: data analysis revealed an increase in the use of social networks: 94.3% (Facebook), 100 % (Whatsapp) and 88.7 % (Instagram). All the students surveyed referred to Facebook as a useful tool for the subject, and 60.4 % stated that its main strengths are its ease of access and the possibility of retrieving educational materials published in the website of the subject. Whatsapp was ranked as useful by all the students, with quick doubt clarification as the most commonly cited strength (58.5 %). Use of Instagram was evaluated as good by 92.5 % of the students surveyed. The main use mentioned was the possibility of obtaining new information in easy-to-read texts. Conclusions: the young students were quite receptive to the incorporation of social networks into Biosafety in Dentistry training, and stated that these would be beneficial to the learning process, with specific uses depending on the social network used.
... One of the factors that threaten professionalism worldwide is the unpreparedness of healthcare providers to transition to virtual interactions with patients [15][16][17], hence the need to promote professionalism in medical education has risen and is constantly being modified [18][19][20]. Some studies on healthcare students [21,22], the majority of which done in Western and Westernized countries, showed the importance of implementing guidelines on the professional use of social media, but a limited number of studies [23][24][25] targeted all categories of healthcare students. In Lebanon, we found no research to date tackling social media use and professionalism, neither on students nor on healthcare workers. ...
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Background Nowadays, social media have become central in the daily lives of people, including healthcare professionals. Fears arise that the accelerated growth of these social platforms was not accompanied by the appropriate training of the healthcare students and workers on the professional use of social media. This study primarily aimed to assess the awareness of the healthcare students at Beirut Arab University, Lebanon on the professional standards of social media. It also aimed to assess the presence of differences in the practices and attitudes of healthcare students according to gender and major. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed, and a paper-based questionnaire was distributed to healthcare students. Chi-Square test was used to analyse certain findings. Results Out of 1800 students approached, 496 participated in the questionnaire. All participants used social media. Only 19.5% (96/496) of them had received a structured education on the professional use of social media during their university study. The majority of students (349/488, 71.5%) thought that the professional standards on social media are distinct from those established in face-to-face interactions. Female students were more likely to get adequate answers in accordance with international guidelines. There were statistically significant differences in the practices and attitudes of students belonging to different majors (p value < 0.05). Conclusion The line between what is professional on social media, and what is not, remains blurred for healthcare students. This study uncovered the need for clear and updated evidence-based guidelines assisting students in making the most appropriate decisions in the various online scenarios faced in healthcare practice.
... Little by little, mobile health services accompanied by SM sites will become wildly popular. Most of students studying health subjects utilize social media platforms in various ways (29)(30)(31). With the SM, students have the opportunity to share, express, and exchange knowledge and information with each other in an educational setting (32). ...
... Previous literature also reported that urologist's use of social media to access knowledge was the third priority, after congresses and textbooks (Rivas et al. 2017). However, reviewing the use of social media by Australian medical students shows that for them media was the first choice when access medical information (Usher et al. 2014) Findings of the present research showed that it is not easy for physicians to ensure the accuracy of some health information on social media. Previous literature findings also reported that health content assessment in social media is a complex process (Vance, Howe, and Dellavalle 2009;Moturu and Liu 2011). ...
Article
Recent studies have increasingly emphasised the importance of using social media for knowledge sharing in healthcare. However, few studies have explored physicians’ perspectives. The present study aimed to explore the potential roles of social media for facilitating knowledge sharing from Iranian physicians’ perspectives. In the present qualitative study, semi-structure interview was administered to 21 physicians by adopting a purposive snowball sampling method. The data analysis was done using the thematic analysis method by MAXQDA 10. The analysis of interviews resulted in the extraction of 164 codes into three themes and eight sub-themes. Accordingly, the main benefits of social media for sharing health knowledge were as follows: supporting information encountering, stimulate knowledge sharing and facilitating tacit knowledge sharing. Although physicians have different attitudes toward using social media, similar to other health professionals, facilitating the role of social media to facilitate knowledge sharing can be beneficial to physicians The study aims to provide an opportunity for physicians and healthcare management to better understand the impact of social media in health knowledge sharing.
Article
Our aim was to explore the current state of e-learning activities during physiotherapy and occupational therapy education, in relation to theories and models about learning. What kind of e-learning activities were described and which were the intentions behind the use of digital support expressed in current physiotherapy and occupational therapy literature? The search was done using four different search engines. Twenty articles met the inclusion criteria and where included. Three categories of e-learning activities were identified. (1) Communication space, (2) enabling learning activities, and (3) ambition to create a learning space. The first category revolved around the individual use of social media, how it could be developed and the benefits from it in a learning environment. The second category had a narrow focus on a specific element of the learning sequence and how it is mastered and/or perceived. The third category, the theoretical base, is varied covering considerations about the learning itself from constructivist and connectivist origin and theories pertaining to the design of teaching and learning activities. The underlying theoretical support for the activity developed was only described in some of the studies. To furthering the field clearer rationale informed by research developed theories and models would promote system alignment and educational development. This review maybe of value to educators in physiotherapy and occupational therapy as it proposes frameworks that may guide in identifying approaches to improve education.
Article
Objectives The aim of this review was to explore healthcare students' professional and personal use and understanding of social media. Design and data sources A comprehensive search was performed in October 2017 using CIHAHL, Academic Search Complete, Education Search Complete, ERIC, MEDLINE and British Education Index. A further search was completed in February 2018 including Google Scholar. Review methods A summary table was used to organise data by author, year, type of study, methods, findings, limitations, recommendations and additional comments. Qualitative findings were organised into related themes and these were reviewed and discussed amongst the authors to confirm their relevance. Results The prevalent themes that emerged were; understanding social media, perceptions of professional & safe social media use, positive aspects of social media and factors influencing social media usage. Conclusions Social media is predominately used by students to communicate with peers and to access course related information. It can provide a collaborative environment which allows engagement and promotion of the nursing profession. Student nurses are generally aware of what constitutes safe and professional social media usage but there remains a need for additional training on how students should navigate the online world as there remains a significant risk of unprofessional behaviours.
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Contextsocial media applications allow peoples to communicate their information and thoughts over the internet rather than face-to-face, postal, journals, radio, television, magazine or newspapers Different informations like loves, entertainment, political, social, business, insights could be shared between individuals In some countries, the use of social media for health information communication was assessed among university's students yet in Ethiopia Objective The study aimed at determining the use of social media for health information and associated factors among university students. Design An institution-based cross sectional study was done in March 2019 SettingDebreberhan University. Participants 845 undergraduate students was selected using simple random sampling technique.Main outcome measures the use of social media applications for health information communication Results from 845 study participants, 444 (52 5%) have used different social Media for different reasons The most preferred social media applications were Face book (82 4%), and mostly visited information was related to exercise (47 7%) Respondents' mothers educational status (AOR = 4 66, 95% CI:[1 96,11 08],spent 240 minutes on social media network per day (AOR= 6 78, 95% CI: [1 65, 27 82]), daily users of social media (AOR= 1 79, 95% CI: [1 07, 3 02]), health profession students (AOR= 2 59, 95% CI: [1 45, 4 63]), and students who have good internet use skill (AOR= 2 94, 95% CI: [1 22, 7 09]) were significantly factors. Conclusions The use of social media applications for health information communication was good Spent more time on social media, being daily users, being health students and having good internet browsing skill were significantly associated factors
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Prevailing approaches to graduate employability tend to focus on human capital, in the form of work-related skills and knowledge. Such approaches often overlook dispositional and contextual factors that contribute to a person’s employability, such as strength of career identity and connectedness with professional communities. This chapter evaluates an effort to incorporate connectedness learning into a core third-year unit of a health sciences degree at an Australian university, using the social networking site LinkedIn as the basis for a reflective employability report and goal setting assignment. Student feedback about the module and qualitative thematic analysis of the students' employability reports demonstrated that most students viewed employability as the possession of human capital and exhibited low levels of connectedness capabilities. We argue that university leaders and educators need to adopt more sophisticated approaches to employability, such as connectedness learning, in order to help students become employable graduates.
Chapter
e-professionalism and nurse education: the awareness to action educational framework
Article
Purpose: To determine the relationship between social media usage characteristics and alexithymia in nursing students. Design and methods: The study was conducted with 272 nursing students between November and December 2018 in Turkey. Data were collected using an information form to determine the sociodemographic and social media usage characteristics of the students, and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Findings: According to the results of this study, nursing students use Instagram the most. As time spent on social media increases, the alexithymia score increases and students have difficulty recognizing their feelings. Practice implications: As the use of social media by nursing students affects their mental process and behavior patterns, the results of social media applications, which witness a wide range of feelings, thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors, should be included in the nursing curriculum.
Article
Background Previous research has addressed nursing course components such as clinical placements that affect students' socialisation processes and the development of their professional identities. Social media is an increasingly important factor that has not yet been explored in-depth in terms of its influence on the development of the professional identity of nursing and is a major gap in our knowledge and understanding of undergraduate nurses' development. Objective To understand the influence of social media usage on the development of undergraduate nursing students' professional identity. Design Descriptive qualitative study. Setting Two universities in Saudi Arabia. Participants Sixteen undergraduate nursing students. Methods Semi-structured and audio-recorded interviews were undertaken between November 2018 and January 2019. The transcribed data were thematically analysed using NVivo 12. Results Three main themes emerged: Learning about nursing professional identity through social media, adopting the identity of nursing, and students sharing their understanding of nursing professional identity via social media. Students used social media to learn about the nursing profession, and this helped them to develop a sense of belonging to the nursing profession. The students also used social media to share their experiences as nursing students and to enhance society's understanding of the importance of the nursing profession. Conclusion Undergraduate nursing students should be encouraged to develop their professional identity through socialisation. Social media can facilitate the socialisation process of undergraduate nursing students by connecting them with members of the nursing community.
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Rational. Social networking sites and social media play an important role in attracting international students that seek universities and academic programs outside their own countries. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and YouTube have changed the way international students search for the universities in the United States. The problem is that it is unclear which social media tools international students use when making their academic choices. The gathered information could serve as a useful tool for universities to understand how students utilize social media and how to reach out to them. Objective. The objective of this qualitative systematic review of literature was to examine the types of social media tools utilized by international students when searching for universities in the United States since 2010. Methodology. The current study utilized qualitative systematic literature review design to identify, evaluate, and present literature related to the research question. The review consisted of three main phases: (1) planning the review, (2) conducting the review, and (3) reporting the review. Science Direct and Emerald Insights databases were searched using several combinations of search terms. Based on the quality assessment, 23 articles were selected for final analysis of broad categories, including research methods, findings, limitation, and future research. Key Findings. The majority of students reported using Facebook and Twitter for information seeking, finding, sending, and receiving. There was no evidence to support that students used specific social media tools when searching for universities and academic programs in the US. Some outcomes of using social media tools were also identified. Conclusion. Although further work is needed to understand what specific social media platforms international students use when seeking for university-specific information, current study indicates that college students thrive in a social media environment. Thus, universities in the US need to be open to these new and continuously developing social platforms and remain engaged with current and potential international students.
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The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Computerised Adaptation and Training Tool (ICATT) is an emergent training tool for improving the efficiency of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) case management training in an in-service or pre-service context. The purpose of this article was to explore nursing campuses’ readiness for the use of ICATT. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive design was employed at 10 nursing campuses in KwaZulu-Natal. Campus principals, nurse educators and learners were purposively sampled. Inclusion criteria for the campus principals were their willingness to participate. Inclusion criteria for the nurse educators included having received and facilitated IMCI case management training and for learners being either second or third year nurse trainees in the R425 training programme. In-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview schedule were used to collect data from seven campus principals, while eight focus group discussions were held with nurse educators and learners. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was conducted manually. Trustworthiness was ensured. Determinants identified in this study were positive attitudes, enablers supporting ICATT implementation and barriers. However, the existence of barriers could have an impact on the adoption of an electronic tool for IMCI case management training. Recommendations include developing the infrastructure at nursing campuses, offering nurse educators training on the implementation of ICATT for teaching and developing the computer skills of learners. ICATT may effectively be used by nurse educators in teaching IMCI case management in a cost-effective manner, while also stimulating independent learning and creativity for the learners involved. Keywords: campus principals; computerised training tool; educators; ICATT; readiness; technology oriented; training programme
Article
Perilaku caring dipandang sebagai bagian penting dari keperawatan dan sebagai kompetensi yang diharapkan pada mahasiswa keperawatan. Kelompok teman sebaya sangat berguna dalam menyediakan lingkungan di mana mahasiswa keperawatan dapat belajar caring. Dukungan sosial juga penting untuk pengembangan profesional dan pribadi mahasiswa keperawatan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini untuk menganalisis hubungan peer caring behavior dan dukungan sosial dengan perilaku caring mahasiswa keperawatan. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian deskriptif korelasional dengan pendekatan cross sectional. Sampel penelitian ini adalah mahasiswa program studi sarjana keperawatan sebanyak 250 mahasiswa yang terdiri dari semester 4, 6 dan 8 teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan total sampling. Instrumen penelitian yang digunakan perilaku caring diadaptasi dari kuesioner Caring Behavior Inventory (CBI) dan kuesioner Peer Caring Behavior Scale serta Social Support Questionnaire. Hasil: Rata-rata peer caring behaviors 63,1, rata-rata dukungan sosial 16,5, rata-rata perilaku caring 129,3, ada hubungan peer caring behavior dengan perilaku caring (r=0,269, p=0,015) dan hubungan dukungan sosial dengan perilaku caring (r=0,215, p=0,01). Kesimpulan: terdapat hubungan antara peer caring behavior dan dukungan sosial dengan perilaku caring. Pendidik harus mendorong pelaksanaan perilaku caring diantara teman sebaya di kalangan mahasiswa sebagai sarana memfasilitasi hubungan mahasiswa dengan pasien dan keluarganya di masa yang akan datang. Pendidik juga mempertimbangkan peran potensial yang berkembang dari teknologi media sosial sebagai sumber dukungan sosial yang dapat diakses dan sebagai media pembelajaran dalam peningkatan perilaku caring. Kata Kunci: peer caring behaviors; dukungan sosial; perilaku caring mahasiswa keperawatan PEER CARING BEHAVIORS AND SOCIAL SUPPORT TOWARDS CARING BEHAVIOR OF BACHELOR NURSING STUDENTS AT FACULTY OF HEALTH HARAPAN BANGSA UNIVERSITY ABSTRACT Caring behavior is seen as an important part of nursing and as an expected competency in nursing students. Peer groups are very useful in providing an environment in which nursing students can learn caring. Social support is also important for the professional and personal development of nursing students. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between peer caring behavior and social support towards nursing students' caring behavior. This research was a descriptive correlational study with a cross sectional approach. The sample of this study was 250 undergraduate nursing students consisting of semesters 4, 6 and 8. The sampling technique used total sampling. The research instrument used caring behavior was adapted from the Caring Behavior Inventory (CBI) questionnaire and the Peer Caring Behavior Scale questionnaire and the Social Support Questionnaire. The average of peer caring behavior was 63.1, the average social support was 16.5, the average caring behavior was 129.3, it is stated that there is a relationship between peer caring behavior and caring behavior (r = 0.269, p = 0.015) and the relationship between social support and caring behavior (r = 0.215, p = 0.01). There is a relationship between peer caring behavior and social support with caring behavior. Educators must encourage the implementation of caring behavior among students as a means of facilitating student relations with patients and their families in the future. Educators also consider the developing potential role of social media technology as an accessible source of social support and as a learning medium in enhancing caring behavior. Keywords: peer caring behavior; social support; caring behavior; nursing student’s caring behaviour
Article
Background Most students are adept in using technology and have developed skills and confidence utilising SoMe for professional purposes. SoMe is used by both registered nurses and student nurses. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional use of SoMe by student nurses in Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and the UK to guide, support and develop implementation of effective and appropriate use of SoMe for professional development. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was completed by student nurses from the three countries. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results The main reason for using social media among Caribbean participants was to watch videos or short clips whereas in UK it was downloading articles. Over 75% participants of all ages believed that social media was likely to help their career. There is no social media guidance for student nurses in Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that social media is embedded in student nurses' professional development throughout their education, with some variation in their use by country. Despite the fundamental place that social media plays in student nurses' professional development, there is no national or international guidance on how student nurses should use social media for professional development.
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Being an effective and well-rounded nurse in Australia is not just about technical skills - it's also about thinking like a nurse. The Road to Nursing helps students develop clinical reasoning and critical reflection skills, understand the philosophical and ethical considerations necessary to care for clients and reflect on how to provide care that meets the unique needs of clients. This edition retains three parts which guide students through their transition to university, formation of a professional identity and progression to professional practice. A revised chapter order improves the transition between topics and a new chapter explores the ever-changing Australian health landscape, including recent technological innovations. Each chapter includes definitions of key terms, reflection questions, perspectives from nurses, end-of-chapter review questions, research topics and resources that connect students with the real-world practice of nursing. Written by healthcare experts, The Road to Nursing is a fundamental resource for students beginning a nursing career.
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The popularity of video games has transcended entertainment crossing into the world of education. While the literature base on educational gaming is growing, there is still a lack of systematic study of this emerging technology’s efficacy. This quasi-experimental study evaluated a teacher created video game on genetics in terms of its affective and cognitive impact on student users. While statistical results indicated no differences (p > .05) in student learning as measured by our instrument, there were significant differences (p < .05) found in the participants’ level of engagement while interfacing with the video game. Implications on this emerging line of inquiry are discussed.
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Widespread use of the Web and other Internet technologies in postsecondary education has exploded in the last 15 years. Using a set of items developed by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), the researchers utilized the hierarchical linear model (HLM) and multiple regressions to investigate the impact of Web-based learning technology on student engagement and self-reported learning outcomes in face-to-face and online learning environments. The results show a general positive relationship between the use the learning technology and student engagement and learning outcomes. We also discuss the possible impact on minority and part-time students as they are more likely to enroll in online courses.
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Microblogging is one of the latest Web 2.0 technologies. The key elements are online communication using 140 characters and the fact that it involves “following” anyone. There has been a great deal of excitement about this in recent months. This paper reports on a research study that was carried out on the use of a microblogging platform for process-oriented learning in Higher Education. Students of the University of Applied Sciences of Upper Austria used the tool throughout their course. All postings were carefully tracked, examined and analyzed in order to explore the possibilities offered by microblogging in education. It can be concluded that microblogging should be seen as a completely new form of communication that can support informal learning beyond classrooms.
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The emergence of Internet-based social media has made it possible for one person to communicate with hundreds or even thousands of other people about products and the companies that provide them. Thus, the impact of consumer-to-consumer communications has been greatly magnified in the marketplace. This article argues that social media is a hybrid element of the promotion mix because in a traditional sense it enables companies to talk to their customers, while in a nontraditional sense it enables customers to talk directly to one another. The content, timing, and frequency of the social media-based conversations occurring between consumers are outside managers’ direct control. This stands in contrast to the traditional integrated marketing communications paradigm whereby a high degree of control is present. Therefore, managers must learn to shape consumer discussions in a manner that is consistent with the organization's mission and performance goals. Methods by which this can be accomplished are delineated herein. They include providing consumers with networking platforms, and using blogs, social media tools, and promotional tools to engage customers.
The business model of healthcare is changing. Value-based purchasing and accountable care initiatives, along with reimbursement incentives and penalties, are creating pressures that are reshaping healthcare delivery approaches and care processes. And today's patients are more engaged and familiar with multimedia information technologies. This article highlights how healthcare organizations are applying social media technologies to address the challenges they face. I explore how these tools are useful for monitoring conversations, proactively resolving complaints, and facilitating transparency. I also review how these tools contribute to enhanced patient experiences and help organizations comply with meaningful use criteria, such as engaging patients and families in their care, improving quality and care coordination, and reducing disparities. The story of Louise, a virtual patient-discharge advocate, demonstrates how social media is helping providers improve health outcomes, reduce costs, and decrease rehospitalizations. Other examples highlight how one secure social networking community is helping case managers better support patients who are on the road to recovery from addiction and describe one hospital's use of a virtual world to help train staff for emergency evacuation. Social media can be used to deliver more patient-centered care and fluid care processes between patients and physicians. Combined with today's mobile technologies, it is a ubiquitous tool that can easily be applied in healthcare environments to solve today's challenges.
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The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career.
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Use of social media by doctors and medical students is common and growing. Although professional standards and codes of ethics that govern the behaviour of medical practitioners in Australia and New Zealand do not currently encompass social media, these codes need to evolve, because professional standards continue to apply in this setting. Inappropriate use of social media can result in harm to patients and the profession, including breaches of confidentiality, defamation of colleagues or employers, and violation of doctor-patient boundaries. The professional integrity of doctors and medical students can also be damaged through problematic interprofessional online relationships, and unintended exposure of personal information to the public, employers or universities. Doctors need to exercise extreme care in their use of social media to ensure they maintain professional standards.
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We analyze over 500 million Twitter messages from an eight month period and find that tracking a small number of flu-related keywords allows us to forecast future influenza rates with high accuracy, obtaining a 95% correlation with national health statistics. We then analyze the robustness of this approach to spurious keyword matches, and we propose a document classification component to filter these misleading messages. We find that this document classifier can reduce error rates by over half in simulated false alarm experiments, though more research is needed to develop methods that are robust in cases of extremely high noise.
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This study reviewed Twitter status updates mentioning "antibiotic(s)" to determine overarching categories and explore evidence of misunderstanding or misuse of antibiotics. One thousand Twitter status updates mentioning antibiotic(s) were randomly selected for content analysis and categorization. To explore cases of potential misunderstanding or misuse, these status updates were mined for co-occurrence of the following terms: "cold + antibiotic(s)," "extra + antibiotic(s)," "flu + antibiotic(s)," "leftover + antibiotic(s)," and "share + antibiotic(s)" and reviewed to confirm evidence of misuse or misunderstanding. Of the 1000 status updates, 971 were categorized into 11 groups: general use (n = 289), advice/information (n = 157), side effects/negative reactions (n = 113), diagnosis (n = 102), resistance (n = 92), misunderstanding and/or misuse (n = 55), positive reactions (n = 48), animals (n = 46), other (n = 42), wanting/needing (n = 19), and cost (n = 8). Cases of misunderstanding or abuse were identified for the following combinations: "flu + antibiotic(s)" (n = 345), "cold + antibiotic(s)" (n = 302), "leftover + antibiotic(s)" (n = 23), "share + antibiotic(s)" (n = 10), and "extra + antibiotic(s)" (n = 7). Social media sites offer means of health information sharing. Further study is warranted to explore how such networks may provide a venue to identify misuse or misunderstanding of antibiotics, promote positive behavior change, disseminate valid information, and explore how such tools can be used to gather real-time health data.
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How staff and units can use social networking to enhance student learning
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