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Monolithic Western Mind? Effect of Fear of Isolation on Context Sensitivity in us Americans, Italians and Chinese

Authors:
  • University of Perugia. Italy
  • Università degli Studi di Perugia e Università per Stranieri di Perugia

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Culture influences what we attend to, encode, remember and think about. Easterners are said to attend more to the relationship between focal objects and their context while Westerners disentangle focal objects from their context. Simply put, Easterners process information holistically and Westerners analytically. Psychosocial factors, like Fear of Isolation, have been proposed as a possible mechanism for cultural differences in terms of information processing. While East vs. West cultural differences are well researched, the monolithic notion that all Westerners process information analytically was questioned in the research presented below. In this paper, we present a study conducted with two Western cultures (Italian and US American) and one Eastern (Chinese) where we induced the chronic psychosocial factor: Fear of Isolation (FOI), and measured its influence on information processing. We found that Italian participants processed information more holistically than US Americans, and that Italians were more similar to Chinese than US Americans.
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... 최근 서로 다른 특성을 가진 집단들 간의 정보 처리 방식의 차이를 비교하는 연구가 활발히 진 행되고 있다 (Masuda, Nisbett, 2001;Kim, Markman, 2006;Kim., Kim, 2010;Federici et al., 2011;Dennis et al., 2014;Hyun et al., 2014;Yoo, Lee, 2015). 이러한 연구의 한 축은 문화 간 비교로 연 구자들은 주로 동양과 서양의 참가자들을 대상으로 주의 (Choi, Nisbett, 2000;Ji et al., 2000), 기억 (Kim, Markman, 2006;Federici et al., 2011), 그리고 범주화 (Chiu, 1972) 등의 다양한 인지 속성에서 의 차이를 검증하여 왔다. ...
... Chua et al. (2005) (Morris, Peng, 1994;Scheufele et al., 2001). Kim, Markman(2006) (Federici et al., 2011;Dennis et al., 2014). 예를 들어, Federici et al.(2011) (Inderbitzen-Nolan, Walters, 2000;Storch et al., 2004;Paik, 2010), 기존 연구결과들 (Kim, Markman, 2006;Federici et al., 2011;Dennis et al., 2014) (Shin, 1998;Lee, 2011). ...
... Kim, Markman(2006) (Federici et al., 2011;Dennis et al., 2014). 예를 들어, Federici et al.(2011) (Inderbitzen-Nolan, Walters, 2000;Storch et al., 2004;Paik, 2010), 기존 연구결과들 (Kim, Markman, 2006;Federici et al., 2011;Dennis et al., 2014) (Shin, 1998;Lee, 2011). 청소년기에 사회불안은 높은 스트레스, 낮은 자기 효능감, 사회기 술 부족 등의 다양한 원인과 이들의 상호작용에 의해 발생한다 (Elkind, 1983;Edelman, 1985;Maddux et al., 1988;Johnson, Glass, 1989;Kendall, Chansky, 1991;Ginsberg et al., 1998;Thompson, Rapee, 2002;Kim, Ahn, 2015). ...
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