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Effect of Green tea on Heart Rate of Male and Female

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Abstract

Camellia sinensis (Green tea) as a hot decoction is widely used throughout the Asia. Therefore to find out their effects on all the body functions are the need of hour, to recommend its safe use. In the current study the effect of Camellia sinensis on human (male and females) heart rate has been studied, by giving one cup of hot decoction of green tea to each subject of fifty four male and fifty four females. The heart rate per minute before and after the decoction was evaluated as; a great increase in the heart rate had been noted in case of males. Also a great decrease in the heart rate of individuals has been identified in case of females. From the current study it can be concluded that green tea have an effect of increasing heart rate in males and decreasing in the females, so the heart patients have to take care while using green tea.
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences 3(4): 180-182, 2011
ISSN: 2040-8773
© Maxwell Scientific Organization, 2011
Received: July 06, 2011 Accepted: July 18, 2011 Published: August 30, 2011
Corresponding Author: Naveed Ullah, Department of Pharmacy, University of Malakand Chakdara, Pakistan. Tel.: 0092-992-
511020/0092-345-5910522 180
Effect of Green tea on Heart Rate of Male and Female
1Naveed Ullah, 1Mir Azam Khan, 2Afzal Haq Asif, 2Afrasiab Ali Shah, 2Sadaf Anwar,
2Hazrat Wahid and 3Aamir Nazir
1Department of Pharmacy, University of Malakand Chakdara, Pakistan
2Department of Pharmacology, Frontier Medical College Abbottabad, Pakistan
3Department of Physiology, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad, Pakistan
Abstract: Camellia sinensis (Green tea) as a hot decoction is widely used throughout the Asia. Therefore to
find out their effects on all the body functions are the need of hour, to recommend its safe use. In the current
study the effect of Camellia sinensis on human (male and females) heart rate has been studied, by giving one
cup of hot decoction of green tea to each subject of fifty four male and fifty four females. The heart rate per
minute before and after the decoction was evaluated as; a great increase in the heart rate had been noted in case
of males. Also a great decrease in the heart rate of individuals has been identified in case of females. From the
current study it can be concluded that green tea have an effect of increasing heart rate in males and decreasing
in the females, so the heart patients have to take care while using green tea.
Key words: Camellia sinensis, decoction, heart rate, males and females
INTRODUCTION
Nature has been a source of medicinal agents and a
large number of drugs are isolated from natural sources.
Medicinal plants have a great value in the field of health.
From the very past the use of herbal medicine have been
very important, and fulfills the primary health care needs
of about 80% of the world population (WHO, 2001).
The leaves ofCamellia sinensis is used as green tea,
which have undergone minimal oxidation during
processing. Green tea originates from China (The Tea
Guardian, 2010b) and has become associated with many
cultures in Asia. According to a survey released by the
United States Department of Agriculture in 2007 (USDA
Database, 2007), the mean content of flavonoidsin a cup
of green tea is higher than that in the same volume of
other food and drink items that are traditionally
considered of health contributing nature, including fresh
fruits, vegetable juices or wine. Flavonoids are a group of
phytochemicals in most plant products that are
responsible for such health effects as anti-oxidative and
anticarcinogenic functions (USDA Database, 2007).
Green tea contains salubriouspolyphenols,
particularlycatechins, the most abundant of which
isepigallocatechin gallate. Green tea also contains
carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
minerals such as chromium, manganese, selenium or zinc,
and certain phytochemical compounds. It is a more potent
antioxidant thanblack tea (Cabrera et al., 2006).
As Camellia sinensis is mostly used as a tea in the
form of hot decoction, throughout the Asia. Therefore the
current study was designed with a view to confirm and
explore the effects of green tea on the heart rate according
to the gender. Whether it is beneficial for males and
females according to heart rate or it may lead tachycardia
or bradycardia, to stop drinking by volunteers’ have heart
problems.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Plant material: The fresh dried leaves of Camellia
sinensis plant were purchased from local market
Abbottabad, Pakistan in March 2011. The study was
performed in the Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Laboratory, Frontier Medical College Abbottabad
Pakistan. The specimen pack, marked with a number 1222
has been deposited in Pharmacy Museum, University of
Malakand Pakistan.
Preparation of decoction: Each sachet contained 02
grams of dried plant material were soaked in each cup of
150 mL boiling water for three minutes. 10 g of sugar
were added as a sweetening agent to each cup.
Experimental protocol: The basis for this investigation
was heart rate of 3rd and 4th year students of Frontier
medical College Abbottabad Pakistan. Subjects were
selected on the basis of four primary criteria. These
Asian J. Med. Sci., 3(4): 180-182, 2011
181
Table 1: Cumulative result of fifty four male and fifty four female
subjects After 30 After 60
Gender Initial heart rate min min
Male 75/min 77/min 85/min
Female 75/min 71/min 60/min
include age, sex, health and Physical body status. The
research specifically targets individuals between 21 and
23 years of age. Fifty four male and fifty four female
students, who fulfilled the above criteria, were selected
for the study. They were first provided a thorough
explanation of the research effort, its benefits and the
potential risks to subjects.
Heart rate was noted in all the volunteers by using
stethoscope before and after the drinking of one cup of
decoction, i.e. before, at 0 min and after 30 and 60 min of
taking the decoction. Cumulative results were calculated
by using formula;
Cumulative Heart Rate = (Sum of heart rate/total number)
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
A total one hundred and eight individual were
selected in the current study, and a cumulative result was
shown in Table 1. A great increase in the heart rate was
observed in the case of males as; in the first half hour a
mild increase in the heart rate had been noted, while in the
next half hour a great increase in the heart rate had been
observed. While in the case of females a little decrease in
the heart rate were noted after half an hour of taking the
tea. Further in the next half hour a great decrease were
measured. From this it can be concluded that Camellia
sinensis has a strong effect on heart rate, i.e., it decreases
the heart rate in normotensive female individuals and
increases heart rate in the normotensive male individuals.
An Australian-led international study of patients with
cardiovascular disease has shown that heart beat rate is a
key indicator for the risk of heart attack. The study,
published in The Lancet (September 2008) studied 11,000
people, across 33 countries, who were being treated for
heart problems. Those patients whose heart rate was
above 70 beats per minute had significantly higher
incidence of heart attacks, hospital admissions and the
need for surgery. University of Sydney professor of
cardiology Ben Freedman from Sydney's Concord
hospital said "If you have a high heart rate there was an
increase in heart attack, there was about a 46 percent
increase in hospitalizations for non-fatal or fatal heart
attack (Heart Beat an Indicator of Disease Risk, 2008).
Seifert et al. (2011) reported that, Green tea extract in
a short-term dosing schedule similar to that commonly
used with dietary supplements did not result in alterations
in heart rate while in the current study it was found that
each cup of green tea have a significant increase of heart
rate in males and decrease of heart rate in females. So it
is recommended for heart patients to take care of drinking
green tea.
There is some evidence suggesting that regular green
tea drinkers have lower chances ofheart disease (The Tea
Guardian, 2010a) and of developing certain types of
cancer (Green Tea’s Cancer-Fighting, 2003). Although
green tea does not raise the metabolic rate enough to
produce immediate weight loss, a green tea extract
containing polyphenols and caffeinehas been shown to
induce thermo genesis and stimulate fat oxidation,
boosting the metabolic rate 4% without increasing the
heart rate (Dulloo et al., 1999). Same was the finding for
females that it couldn’t increase heart rate but decreases
the heart rate, while in males it increases the heart rate.
And it would need further study to find out at which
mechanism the heart rate increase and decrease in either
sex.
CONCLUSION
From the current study it can be concluded that
Camellia sinensis has a strong effect on heart rate, i.e. it
decreases the heart rate in normotensive female
individuals and increases the heart rate in the
normotensive male individuals. So the heart patients have
B.P problems, must have to take care while using the
decoction in excess quantity as the case may be.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
We are deeply indebted to the Professor Dr. A J Khan
Principal, Frontier Medical College for their Laboratory
support and all other participants of this study who gave
us their time, especially Ibrar Hussain and Muhammad
Zahid Laboratory Assistants, Frontier Medical College
Abbottabad Pakistan. Author’s thankful to the
management of Maxwell Scientific Organization for
financing the manuscript for publication.
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Cabrera, C., R. Artach and R. Giménez, 2006. Beneficial
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... The balance in the endothelium between vasodilators, such as nitric oxide and ROS, and vasoconstrictors, such as thromboxane and isoprostane, contributes to vascular resistance and endotheliumdependent contraction. There is clinical and experimental evidence that tea phytochemicals can also improve endothelial function [27][28][29][30] . Green tea prevents heart disease and heart stroke by lowering the blood cholesterol level. ...
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