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The Muhi Quarry: A Fossil-Lagerstätte from the Mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) of Hidalgo, Central México

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... The Muhi Quarry is a Mexican fossil Lagerstätte (Bravo-Cuevas et al., 2012) situated in northwestern Zimapán municipality of the State of Hidalgo that has been exploited for more than thirty years to obtain limestones for construction. The rocks of the locality contain a diverse Cretaceous marine biota, which includes nannoplankton, foraminifers, radiolarians (Ward, 1979;Bravo-Cuevas et al., 2009), ammonites, crustaceans (Vega et al., 2003;Feldman et al., 2007;Hegna et al., 2014), planktonic crinoids, echinoderm spines, fishes (chondrichthyans, actinopterygians and sarcopterygians) and indeterminate reptiles (González-Rodríguez et al., 2013a, b, 2016González-Rodríguez, 2008, 2010;Fielitz, 2008, 2009;Arratia et al., 2018;Baños-Rodríguez et al., 2020;Schultze and González-Rodríguez, 2016). ...
... The Las Espinas Formation is composed of an approximately 400 m-thick andesitic-basaltic lava flows, as well as felsic tuffs and agglomerates Mapes, 1956, 1957). The Quaternary is represented by alluvial, colluvial, and soil deposits (Bravo-Cuevas et al., 2009, 2012. ...
... The first time we were there, the exposure was 7.2 m high, and now they are quarrying about 3 m deeper. The sequence consists of biomicritic and micritic limestones with intercalated bedded and nodular cherts, and scarce laminae of unconsolidated siliciclastic clay and calcium carbonate (Bravo-Cuevas et al., 2009, 2012. The environment reflected by the lithology and fossil assemblages corresponds to an outer marine shelf, with well-oxygenated waters, which occasionally received pulses of pelagic waters and near-shore waters during storms (Bravo-Cuevas et al., 2009, 2012. ...
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The fossil-rich limestones (La Negra Facies of the El Doctor Formation) in the Muhi Quarry, northwestern State of Hidalgo, Mexico are of late Albian age based on the occurrence of the ammonites Mortoniceras sp., Hamites aff. renzi and ?Beudanticeras sp. Their occurrence establishes the possible presence of the M. fallax, M. rostratum, M. prinflatum, and A. briacensis Zones (upper Albian) in North America. The late Albian age of the El Doctor Formation makes its teleostean aulopiforms and acanthomorphs the oldest in the world and the occurrence of the chondrichthyans Ptychodus decurrens and Squalicorax falcatus, and the teleostean Tselfatiiformes are their oldest records in Mexico.
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