Chapter

Web 2.0 and Digital Business Models

Authors:
  • DB Bahn, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
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Abstract

The increasing acceptance and prevalence of the Internet as a modern information and communications technology has advanced the commercial use and enabled the development of digital business models. Since 2005, increasing Internet services can be noted in this context, that can be associated with the phenomenon of Web 2.0 and that changed the Internet Economy (Wirtz 2010, p. 328). This paper analyses the strategic implications of the changes of digital business models through Web 2.0. For this reason, Internet business models are first classified based on the 4C-Net-Business-Model typology (Wirtz 2000; Wirtz and Lihotzky 2003, p. 522), then the term Web 2.0 is defined and an empirically validated model of explanation regarding strategically relevant components of the Web 2.0 is shown (Wirtz et al. 2010). Using these components, the influence of Web 2.0 on single Internet business models is explained. Thereby, various Web 2.0 applications are assigned to the business models. Moreover, the effect of individual Web 2.0 components towards the applications is explained and implications for practice are derived.

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