Article

Public Health and Climate Change Adaptation at the Federal Level: One Agency's Response to Executive Order 13514

American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 4.55). 01/2014; 104(3). DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301796
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Climate change will likely have adverse human health effects that require federal agency involvement in adaptation activities. In 2009, President Obama issued Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. The order required federal agencies to develop and implement climate change adaptation plans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of a larger Department of Health and Human Services response to climate change, is developing such plans. We provide background on Executive Orders, outline tenets of climate change adaptation, discuss public health adaptation planning at both the Department of Health and Human Services and the CDC, and outline possible future CDC efforts. We also consider how these activities may be better integrated with other adaptation activities that manage emerging health threats posed by climate change. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print January 16, 2014: e1-e9. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301796).

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    • "To prevent heat-related morbidity and mortality, local municipalities face an increasing need to identify populations most vulnerable to extreme heat, and spatial analyses using local data may assist these efforts. National research priorities pertaining to climate change and health have garnered attention from public and private entities, and several researchers have called for the integration of climate and health data to better inform climate change mitigation and adaptation planning decisions (Hess, Schramm, and Luber 2014; Bierbaum et al. 2013; Miles et al. 2006). Heat-related vulnerability, as defined by Wilhemi and Hayden (2010), comprises exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2014
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    • "To prevent heat-related morbidity and mortality, local municipalities face an increasing need to identify populations most vulnerable to extreme heat, and spatial analyses using local data may assist these efforts. National research priorities pertaining to climate change and health have garnered attention from public and private entities, and several researchers have called for the integration of climate and health data to better inform climate change mitigation and adaptation planning decisions (Hess, Schramm, and Luber 2014; Bierbaum et al. 2013; Miles et al. 2006). Heat-related vulnerability, as defined by Wilhemi and Hayden (2010), comprises exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. "
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