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An Efficient Scheme for Traffic Management in ATM Networks

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As ATM network is designed for broad band transmission that is high data rate (25 Mbps to 2.5 Gbps) and supports the transmission of every kind of data, congestion control and delay have been important issues for ATM networks. Data transmission is done in the form of cell (53 bytes) relay. Hence, cell sequence and the error control have to be carried out properly. ATM networks presents difficulties in effectively controlling congestion not found in other types of networks, including frame relay networks. In this paper, we present an efficient methodology for traffic management. The simulation results suggest that the proposed solution is effective for both slow and high data rate transmission.
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  • M Anagostu
  • A Georgantas
G. Stamoulis, M. Anagostu, and A. Georgantas, "Traffic source models for ATM networks," A survey in Computer Communications, Vol. 17, Issue. 6, pp. 428-438, 1994.
5. A proposed approach for offset mechanism for ATM networks in RT
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Fig. 5. A proposed approach for offset mechanism for ATM networks in RT