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Do I trust google? An exploration of how people form trust in cloud computing

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Abstract

The present study explores individual end-users' perspectives of cloud computing, especially issues regarding their trust/distrust of cloud services. While current cloud computing service development focuses on adoption by enterprises and organizations, individual end-users who use cloud services in their everyday lives also constitute an important consumer group. Challenges of trust in cloud computing have gained social and scholarly attention accompanied with the rise of privacy and data security concerns. Studies that investigate individual end-users' views of trust in cloud services, however, are rare. Using semi-structured interviews and a survey questionnaire, the present study aims to capture how ordinary individuals think about cloud computing and how they form their trust/distrust of cloud services and service providers. In this poster, authors present preliminary results of analysis of interview data.

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