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... For several years now, planet Earth has been facing a significant increase in human activity, reaching worrying levels regarding the consumption of natural resources and other environmental issues, such as climate change, pollution, destruction of forests, and consequently, a decrease in biodiversity [1,2]. Sustainable development is defined by the United Nations as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, which is directly related to the preservation of natural resources [1,3]. ...
... For several years now, planet Earth has been facing a significant increase in human activity, reaching worrying levels regarding the consumption of natural resources and other environmental issues, such as climate change, pollution, destruction of forests, and consequently, a decrease in biodiversity [1,2]. Sustainable development is defined by the United Nations as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, which is directly related to the preservation of natural resources [1,3]. Many industries started to adopt this concept following the rising quality; however, it is used essentially to produce cork agglomerates [16,37]. ...
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There is a drive within the cosmetic industry towards the development of more sustainable products, supported by consumer awareness of the environmental footprint. The cosmetic industry is rising to meet consumer demand by following practices, such as the use of by-products from agro-industrial waste. Quercus suber is a tree prevalent in the Mediterranean basin. The extraction of cork is considered sustainable, as this process does not harm the tree, and the amount of cork produced increases with the number of extractions. Beyond this, the cork industry produces by-products that are used to sustain the industry itself, such as cork powder, which is reused for generating energy. Additionally, cork and cork by-products contain bioactive compounds mainly with antioxidant activity that can be of use to the cosmetic industry, such as for antiaging, anti-acne, anti-inflammatory, and depigmenting cosmetic products. We provide the reader with an overview of the putative cosmetic applications of cork and its by-products as well as of their bioactive compounds. It is noteworthy that only a few cork-based cosmetic products have reached the market, namely antiaging and exfoliant products. Clearly, the use of cork upcycled cosmetic ingredients will evolve in the future considering the wide array of biological activities already reported.
... According to Johnston et al. [11], the concept of sustainability is not properly understood due to inconsistency and ambiguity in definitions and that the true meaning of the term is distorted. Hay et al. [12] state that the reason why sustainability is difficult to define is that there are several understandings of the term and that several different interests make a unified definition difficult. ...
... Even though several subjects were aware of both the Brundtland definition of sustainable development and the multi-dimensional nature of the concept, it became clear that the environmental dimension was predominant. This is by no means uncommon, as has been pointed out by several authors ( [9][10][11][12][13]). This is due to several factors, one being the complexity and the scope of the term itself, illustrated by the UN's 17 sustainability goals, and the associated 169 targets [57]. ...
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This article presents a study of sustainability in railway investment projects. The purpose of the study was to analyse how sustainability is interpreted and evaluated in the early phases of major public investment projects. These phases are characterized by potentially very influential decisions being made prior to when precise, detailed knowledge is available. The research uses a mix of qualitative and quantitative information sources and three datasets; 12 interviews, document analyses for 10 railway projects, and a case study. The qualitative data are from semi-structured interviews, while the quantitative data are based on structured document review of planning documents from ten Norwegian railway projects. In addition, a detailed case study of a major rail infrastructure project has been performed. The findings show that several aspects of sustainability are evaluated in the early phase of investment projects, but there are no explicit requirements to do an overall analysis of sustainability. Environmental aspects of sustainability are predominant in the respondents’ interpretation of the concept. Still, the structure and requirements of the early phases in the national project model ensures that the economic dimension of sustainability has the most influence in decisions regarding which project concepts that receive financing for further development.
... l educators, demonstrates that affective qualities related to connection and love for the environment are fundamental for the development of sustainability, along with the requirements of knowledge, attitudes, and sustainable practices.Incorporation is also a consequence of the effective production of bonds within the affection/sensitization scope.Hay, Duffy, and Whitfield (2014) report that although there are important studies on sustainability, there is a great distance between the 6 MEDINA, Alice Maria Corrêa. Relational paradigm of life, new meanings and values for life when viruses threaten. Revista da FUNDARTE. Montenegro, p.01-10, ano 21, nº 44, janeiro/março de 2021. Disponível em: http://.seer.fundarte. ...
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Observando o contexto das novas pandemias de coronavírus percorrido atualmente pela humanidade, é possível avaliar de forma ampla e segura a distância entre o ser humano e o meio ambiente em termos de percepção, leitura e compreensão da natureza em seus ecossistemas e ambientes. A promoção de debates e reflexões sobre a produção de sentidos para a vida, a partir das relações humanas e ambientais, pode ser considerada uma importante estratégia para a formação de vínculos comuns, evidenciando a necessidade de uma mudança na lógica dominante para uma relação mais orgânica. entre a humanidade e o meio ambiente.
... Many focused studies have been performed to degrade aliphatic polyester and polycarbonate mainly by bacteria, enzyme yeast, fungi and cell extract in the labs or in the natural environment like in soil or in aqueous settings [54]. In addition to this, enzymes are the natural or synthetic biological catalysts which trigger the depolymerization of polymer, polycarbonate and aliphatic polyesters [55]. For example, proteases cleave the peptide bond in poly-L-lactic acid whereas, esterases hydrolysis the ester bonds of fats and depolymerizes the polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-ether sulfones and poly-ester amide [56,57]. ...
... Many focused studies have been performed to degrade aliphatic polyester and polycarbonate mainly by bacteria, enzyme yeast, fungi and cell extract in the labs or in the natural environment like in soil or in aqueous settings [54]. In addition to this, enzymes are the natural or synthetic biological catalysts which trigger the depolymerization of polymer, polycarbonate and aliphatic polyesters [55]. For example, proteases cleave the peptide bond in poly-L-lactic acid whereas, esterases hydrolysis the ester bonds of fats and depolymerizes the polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-ether sulfones and poly-ester amide [56,57]. ...
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Recycling is groundwork of the worldwide efforts to diminish the amount of plastics in waste. Mostly around 7.8-8.2 million tons of poorly-used plastics enter the oceans every year. Non-biodegradable plastics settlements in landfills are uncertain, which hinders the production of land resources. Non-biodegradable plastic solid wastes, carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, various air pollutants, cancerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins, released to the environment cause severe damage and harmfulness to the inhabitants. Due to the bio-degradability and renewability of biopolymers, petroleum-based plastics can be replaced with bio-based polymers in order to minimize the environmental risks. In this review article, bio-degradability of polymers has been discussed. The mechanisms of bio-recycling have been particularly emphasized in the present article.
... Many focused studies have been performed to degrade aliphatic polyester and polycarbonate mainly by bacteria, enzyme yeast, fungi and cell extract in the labs or in the natural environment like in soil or in aqueous settings [54]. In addition to this, enzymes are the natural or synthetic biological catalysts which trigger the depolymerization of polymer, polycarbonate and aliphatic polyesters [55]. For example, proteases cleave the peptide bond in poly-L-lactic acid whereas, esterases hydrolysis the ester bonds of fats and depolymerizes the polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-ether sulfones and poly-ester amide [56,57]. ...
... Among the different proposals provided by the literature, sustainability may be defined as the ability to meet "the needs of a firm's direct and indirect stakeholders (such as shareholders, employees, clients, pressure groups, communities, etc.), without compromising its ability to meet the needs of future stakeholders as well" [61]. Thus, sustainability plays a crucial role in identifying what products/services to provide, in which way (processes), to whom (people), and the consequences for stakeholders (investors, consumers, and society) [3,62]. In achieving these goals, organizations must improve stakeholders' loyalty and avoid mistaken, dangerous, and damaging actions [63] in order to maintain and increase their economic, social, and environmental capital [61]. ...
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This paper aims to explore the relationships between knowledge management (KM), performance measurement systems (PMSs), and small and medium enterprises’ (SMEs) economic sustainability in knowledge-intensive sectors. The literature demonstrates that SMEs are often characterized by unstructured KM approaches and limited PMS implementation, being at the same time affected by scarce profitability and financial issues. Adopting the knowledge-based view of the firm and the contingency theory of PMSs, we tested the impact of two alternative KM approaches (exploitation and exploration) on SMEs’ economic sustainability, measuring the moderating effect of PMS use (diagnostic and interactive). Through an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression of data collected for 219 Italian medium firms operating in knowledge-intensive sectors, this study provides evidence on how a specific KM approach supports the SME economic sustainability and how a consistent implementation and use of PMS amplify the relationship between KM and economic sustainability. Data analysis confirms the relevance of some key concepts of the knowledge-based view of the firm, especially the positive impact of the KM exploration approach on economic sustainability. Additionally, the paper extends empirical evidence for the PMS moderating effect on the KM–performance relationship. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a study provides evidence for the relationships among KM, PMSs, and economic sustainability in the SME setting. Moreover, our findings lead to some managerial implications, especially they encourage SME entrepreneurs and managers to design a coherent KM approach and to implement an adequate PMS in order to support economic sustainability.
... From the perspective of global sustainability science and practice, finance, technology, capacity building, trade, policy coherence, partnerships, data, monitoring and accountability are the terms necessary to implement global and national improvements with regard to the achievement of SDGs (Stafford-Smith et al., 2017). It has been also shown, that humans can influence activity behaviour by implementing sustainability goals and the knowledge is a key driver of human action towards sustainability (Hay et al., 2014). A survey of academics showed that respondents favoured different concepts of sustainable development where environmental, social and economic dimensions are separated and not presented in an integrated way (Sinakou et al., 2018). ...
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Countries have to work out and follow tailored strategies for the achievement of their Sustainable Development Goals. At the end of 2018, more than 100 voluntary national reviews were published. The reviews are transformed by text mining algorithms into networks of keywords to identify country-specific thematic areas of the strategies and cluster countries that face similar problems and follow similar development strategies. The analysis of the 75 VNRs has shown that SDG5 (gender equality) is the most discussed goal worldwide, as it is discussed in 77% of the analysed Voluntary National Reviews. The SDG8 (decent work and economic growth) is the second most studied goal, With 76 %, while the SDG1 (no poverty) is the least focused goal, it is mentioned only in 48 % of documents and the SDG10 (reduced inequalities) in 49 %. The results demonstrate that the proposed benchmark tool is capable of highlighting what kind of activities can make significant contributions to achieve sustainable developments.
... Growth in population and economic activitiessuch as agriculture and industrialization has negative effects on the environment. Therefore, preserving the balance in the exploitation and use of natural resources is crucial to avoid that such growth becomes unsustainable [1]. From this perspective, society, government institutions, and the industrial sector play crucial roles [2]. ...
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Asset management (AM) is the core business function of grid-based asset management organizations (GAMO). GAMO are looking for compliance with a new international AM standard (ISO 55 000). Currently, a limited perspective – consisting of New Public Management (NPM) and project management (PM) – provides meaning for the new AM standard. However, the limited perspective is not sufficient in aligning AM / GAMO with energy transition and environmental management successfully. The article is aiming at enabling the ISO AM standard to become a co-creational force in energy transition and environmental management. Based on professional engagement and substantial literature review the article employs ‚reflective practice' and causal loop diagrams to identify and elaborate issues of concern that need to be addressed by an enriched perspective on ISO AM: 1) organizational ‚line of sight' (complement key performance indicators with evidence-based causal relationships), 2) control of work (complement formal institutions with AM professionalism), 3) management accounting (advance decision support for the management of the capex/opex relationship), 4) transition modeling (advance agent-based models of AM), and 5) the sustainable management of the resource soil (assess the ecosystem services/disservices that arise from underground urban space use by GAMO during transition times).
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