Human Factors Aspects of Using Head Up Displays in Automobiles: Review Of The Literature

Article · February 1970with 228 Reads
Abstract
This document provides an overview of studies investigating the use of HUDs by aviators and drivers, including a summary of HUD research variables, test procedures and study results. The predicted performance advantages of automotive HUDs include increased eyes-on-the-road time and reduced reaccommodation time, particularly for the older driver. To date, the research does not provide robust evidence for operationally significant performance advantages due to HUDs. However, conclusions are equivocal due to the interaction of independent variables such as workload, display complexity and age. Studies indicate that key operator performance issues with HUDs include contrast interference, where HUD symbology masks safety-critical targets in the forward driving scene, and cognitive capture, or degradation of responses to external targets due to the processing of information from a HUD image. In general, the review supports and extends earlier findings that HUD information cannot be ...
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