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Abstract

Antifungal activities of methanol (FA), ethyl acetate (FC) and aqueous (FD) extracts of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb against Fusarium oxysporum and Colletotrichum sp. were determined. FC showed significant activity against both fungi even at 2,000 mu g mL(-1). The activity of FC was not significantly different (p>0.05) compared with that of captan, a known fungicide against F. oxysporum and Colletotrichum spp. FC was fractionated using normal phase vacuum liquid chromatography, resulting in ten fractions. Six out of the ten fractions showed activity against both fungi. FC6 had a minimum inhibitory. concentration (MIC) of 200 ppm. These results showed that onion bulb can be a source of compounds that can serve as templates for future fungicides against Fusarium oxysporum and Colletotrichum spp.
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... However, listerias cells treated with onion juice showed a significant decrease (P <0.05) to 2.0 × 104 CFUmL-1 (4.30 log CFUmL-1) and zero CFUmL-1 for FLB6 strain and to 1.2 × 104 CFUmL-1 (4.08 log CFUmL-1) and 2.2 × 102 CFUmL-1 (2.34 log CFUmL-1) for FLB12 strain in BHI broth treated with 3% and 5% onion juice, respectively within 96 h. Onion juice has been extensively studied for its antimicrobi-al activity against a wide range of bacterial, fungal, and parasitic organisms (Irkin and Vol 25, No. 1; Korukluoglu 2007; Cornago et al. 2011). However, a limited data is available so far regarding its efficacy against Listeria spp. ...
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