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Motivations of non-use of telecentres: a qualitative study from Mozambique.

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  • Data-Pop Alliance

Abstract and Figures

On the cutting-edge scene for several years, and recently overtaken by the diffusion of more personal and pervasive technologies, telecentres have attracted and are still luring the interests of Governments in developing regions. To individuate improvement strategies and give food for thoughts to researchers and practitioners in the area, this study presents an in-depth qualitative analysis of the reasons why local people in Mozambique do not access the telecentre component of their local Community Multimedia Centers (CMCs). Based on 229 semi-structured interviews, the analysis allows to depict four main clusters of reasons for non-use, to finally suggest how they can be overcome.
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... The dominant stream has solely focused on hard constructs (also referred to as quantifiable or tangible constructs). Such studies have thus far considered concepts such as service quality (chigona, 2007;Vannini et al, 2013), adoption of initiatives (Vannini, 2015), skills level and training (Madon, 2005a;Dada, 2006), functionality of centres (Attwood, 2013), cost-benefit analysis (Kumar, 2004;Ali and Bailur, 2007), system usage (Mtega, 2009;Mbatha, 2015), user satisfaction (Hossain, 2015), technical barriers (Jacobs and Herselman, 2004) and information needs (Lwoga, 2010). Nonetheless, it has been noted that further evaluations of telecenters are required (Madon et al., 2009). ...
... This study uses the same terminology as Heeks in referring to 'Soft' constructs which equate to intangible (unquantifiable) factors that influence the outcome of IS initiatives. From the earlier literature (Chigona, 2007;Vannini et al, 2013), we are informed that evaluations are predisposed to measure or consider tangible (quantifiable or 'Hard') elements in an attempt to determine factors that account for success/failure of an initiative. Heeks' argument is that in as much as these tangible factors are important, evaluators should equally consider or shift their focus towards intangible measures in ICT project evaluations. ...
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... Physical places are still an important component of access to ICTs -and training in their use -for marginalized populations (Best, Thakur, & Kolko, 2010;Kleine, 2013;Parkinson & Lauzon, 2008;Peña-López, 2013). People often go to CTCs even if they have access through mobile technologies or via PC at home, as they value social and peer learning versus individual access Gómez, 2011;Rega, 2019;Sey et al., 2013;Vannini, Rega, Sala, & Cantoni, 2013). The popularity of innovation hubs confirms the key value of physical venues in ICTs education, innovation and entrepreneurship (European Network of Living Labs, 2014;Friederici, 2014;Jimenez & Zheng, 2018). ...
... In the broader ICT4D literature, a number of reasons behind such non-use or non-motivation have been advanced. These do support some of the elements that emerged from our interviews with Mamas: a lack of confidence in the ability of technologies to meet collective needs (Selwyn 2003); limited relevance of new technologies in day-to-day, routine activities (Vannini, Rega and Cantoni 2013); the role played by material resources and economic capacity (high costs and specifications) (Sambasivan et al. 2015); and a range of cognitive and affective factors that determine individuals' engagement with technology (Sabiescu et al. 2013). ...
Chapter
Our study is guided by the following research question: “What are the discourses associated with ICTs among collective groups in marginalized communities?” In addressing this question, this study represents an initial step to contribute to theoretical and empirical discussions of discourse in ICT4D (Bladergroen et al. 2012), collective capability (Ibrahim 2006), ICT-enabled empowerment (Avgerou 2010), and participatory and inclusive development (Fuchs 2010). In light of this, we will uncover the social appropriation of ICTs by communities to build toward more inclusive, contextual and socially responsive technologies and approaches.
... This has resulted in a lack of confidence in developing economies and the belief that they are not on par with the rest of the world" (Jhunjhunwala, Ramachandran, & Bandyopadhyay, 2004: p.30). This paper departs from the compilations of factors for the success or failure of pro-poor public ICT initiatives Awotwi & Owusu, 2010;Johansson, 2011;Chaudhri & Dash, 2007;Vannini, 2013; such as the CIC of Ghana to undertake a critical analysis of the underlying reasons for implementation failures (Bailur, 2008;. We suggest that this phenomenon can benefit from a micro and macro examination (users, management and implementing bodies) through a critical approach to shed light on why the CIC initiative is failing to meet its objective. ...
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