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"Hey, This is not like me!" Convergent validity of computerized personality reports

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Abstract

Introduction/objective. - There is a dearth of research on the validity of computerized personality reports. The present study examined the validity of such reports using various methodologies. Method. - Convergence between personality self-ratings on items and self- and peer-ratings on personality descriptive text blocks used for compiling computerized reports were examined in a sample of 175 psychology undergraduates who were administered the Personality for Professionals Inventory (PfPI; Rolland 82 De Fruyt, 2009). Some weeks after these test administrations, a subsample of individuals was given feedback on their actual sex-normative scores, with half of the sample receiving random scores. Results. - Overall, PfPI-self-ratings on items showed strong rank-order convergence with self- and peer-ratings on 25 sets of three personality descriptive text blocks describing respectively low, medium or high positions on the 25 PfPI traits, underscoring the validity of the report text blocks. However, absolute ratings on text blocks were usually somewhat higher in the socially desirable direction. Assessees were able to discriminate genuine from fake reports, and perception of the text blocks as accurate was negatively associated with the discrepancy between genuine and fake reports. Conclusion. - PfPI-computerized reports are accurate reflections of self-descriptions on PfPI items. Implications for career counseling and development practice are discussed.

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... Psychometric properties, including reliability, construct, content, and predictive validity, are typically quoted as important in choosing a personality assessment (Cicchetti, 1994;Cook, 2004). Other considerations gaining attention include the candidate experience (Ekuma, 2012), acceptance of feedback (Atwater & Brett, 2006;Krings, Jacobshagen, Elfering, & Semmer, 2015), and quality of interpretive reports (De Fruyt & Wille, 2013). Nevertheless, much training in and critique of the use of tests and questionnaires concentrates on construct, content, and predictive validity in a selection context (e.g., British Psychological Society, 2017). ...
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Examined the ability of college students at two levels of defensiveness to discriminate among three types of personality feedback: actual personality feedback based on the student's test scores, trivial feedback which is generally true of all students, and inaccurate feedback which was the exact opposite of the student's actual test scores. The students could reliably discriminate the three types of feedback on the dimensions of uniqueness, usefulness, accuracy, and as a source of new information about themselves. The results are discussed in the context of the Barnum literature to the effect that students can offer valid perceptions of personality descriptions of themselves.
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