Conference Paper

Analytical Evaluation of Proactive Routing Protocols with Route Stabilities under two Radio Propagation Models

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Abstract

This paper contributes to modeling links and route stabilities in three diverse wireless routing protocols. For this purpose, we select three extensively utilized proactive protocols; Destination-Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV), Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) and Fish-eye State Routing (FSR). We also enhance the performance of these protocols by modifying default parameters. Optimization of these routing protocols are done via performance metrics, i.e., average Throughput, End to End Delay (E2ED) and Normalized Routing Load (NRL) achieved by them. Default routing protocols DSDV, OLSR and FSR are compared and evaluated with modified versions named as M-DSDV, M-OLSR and M-FSR using Network Simulator (NS2). Numerical Computations for Route Stabilities of these routing protocols through a mathematical modeled equation is determined and compared with simulation results. Moreover, all-inclusive evaluation and scrutiny of these proactive routing protocols are done under the MAC layer standards 802.11 DCF and 802.11e EDCF. In this way both Network and MAC layer exploration has been done under the performance metrics which gives overall performance and tradeoff with respect to full utilization of the available resources of Ad-hoc network high scalability scenario. Routing latency effects with respect to route stabilities and MAC layer standards 802.11 and 802.11e are compared and scrutinized with the tradeoff observed in throughput and in overhead (NRL) generated.

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... The ns-2 [46] simulator was used during this validation process because it allows us to model several network scenarios and collect statistics through trace files. The OLSR model and also the model used by the ns-2 simulator to evaluate the network performance are described in [47]. Using this simulation tool we defined several network topologies, configure wireless network interfaces and set the node mobility patterns. ...
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