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Contemporary art in medicine: the Cleveland Clinic art collection

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Abstract

Fine art is good medicine. It comforts, elevates the spirit, and affirms life and hope. Art in the healthcare setting, combined with outstanding care and service, creates an environment that encourages healing and supports the work of medical professionals. As one of the world's great medical centers, Cleveland Clinic has always included the arts in its healing environment. The four founders and subsequent leadership encouraged artistic and musical expression by employees. Distinguished artworks have long hung on the walls. In 1983, an Aesthetics Committee was officially formed at Cleveland Clinic to address issues of art and design in Cleveland Clinic facilities.

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What is Evidence-based Art
  • Henry Domke
Henry Domke. What is Evidence-based Art? Available online: http://henrydomke.com/PictureOfHealth.pdf