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Seven Types of Privacy

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Abstract

As technologies to develop, conceptualisations of privacy have developed alongside them, from a “right to be let alone” to attempts to capture the complexity of privacy issues within frameworks that highlight the legal, social-psychological, economic or political concerns that technologies present. However, this reactive highlighting of concerns or intrusions does not provide an adequate framework though which to understand the ways in which privacy should be proactively protected. Rights to privacy, such as those enshrined in the European Charter of Fundamental Rights, require a forward-looking privacy framework that positively outlines the parameters of privacy in order to prevent intrusions, infringements and problems. This paper makes a contribution to a forward-looking privacy framework by examining the privacy impacts of six new and emerging technologies. It analyses the privacy issues that each of these technologies present and argues that there are seven different types of privacy. We also use this case study information to suggest that an imprecise conceptualisation of privacy may be necessary to maintain a fluidity that enables new dimensions of privacy to be identified, understood and addressed in order to effectively respond to rapid technological evolution.
To be published in:
S. Gutwirth et al. (eds.), European Data Protection: Coming of Age,!DOI 10.1007/978-94-
007-5170-5_1, © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
Seven types of privacy
Rachel Finn and David Wright, Trilateral Research & Consulting, London
Michael Friedewald, Fraunhofer ISI, Karlsruhe
1 INTRODUCTION
Theoretical and legal conversations about the relationship between technology and privacy
date back to the 1890s with the advent of portable photography equipment accessible to the
general population.1 As technologies continue to develop, conceptualisations of privacy have
developed alongside them, from a “right to be let alone” to attempts to capture the complexity
of privacy issues within frameworks that highlight the legal, social-psychological, economic
or political concerns that technologies present. However, this reactive highlighting of
concerns or intrusions does not provide an adequate framework though which to understand
the ways in which privacy should be proactively protected. Rights to privacy, such as those
enshrined in the European Charter of Fundamental Rights, require a forward-looking privacy
framework that positively outlines the parameters of privacy in order to prevent intrusions,
infringements and problems. One such framework is presented by Roger Clarke, who, in the
mid-1990s, identified four different categories of privacy, which enabled him to outline
specific protections.2
Clarke was the first privacy scholar of whom we are aware to have categorised the types of
privacy in a logical, structured, coherent way. Others, such as Solove, have also developed a
taxonomy of privacy.3 However, Solove’s taxonomy focuses on privacy harms rather than
characterising the types of privacy.
Since Clarke’s conceptualisation, new and emerging technologies have introduced further
privacy effects, and Clarke’s four categories are no longer adequate to address the concerns
they introduce. This paper makes a contribution to a forward-looking privacy framework by
examining the privacy impacts of six new and emerging technologies. It analyses the privacy
issues that each of these technologies present and argues that despite his initial capturing of
the heterogeneity of privacy categories, Clarke’s taxonomy must be revised and expanded to
include seven different types of privacy. We also use this case study information to suggest
that an imprecise conceptualisation of privacy may be necessary to maintain a fluidity that
enables new dimensions of privacy to be identified, understood and addressed in order to
effectively respond to rapid technological evolution.
1 Samuel Warren and Louis D. Brandeis, “The Right to Privacy,” Harvard Law Review 4 (1890).
2 Roger Clarke, “Introduction to Dataveillance and Information Privacy, and Definitions of Terms” (Xamax
Consultancy, Aug 1997). http://www.rogerclarke.com/DV/Intro.html. Clarke identified these four categories
even earlier, in his PhD Supplication in 1995. See http://www.rogerclarke.com/DV/PhD.html. He has variously
referred to the four categories as categories, interests, dimensions, components and aspects. We use the term
“types”, which Gary T. Marx also uses. See Gary T. Marx, “Privacy is not quite like the weather” in Privacy
Impact Assessment, edited by David Wright and Paul De Hert (Dordrecht: Springer, 2012).
3 See Daniel Solove, Understanding Privacy (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2008).
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2 DEFINING AND CONCEPTUALISING PRIVACY
“Privacy” is a key lens though which many new technologies, and most especially new
surveillance technologies, are critiqued.4 However, “privacy” has proved notoriously difficult
to define. Serge Gutwirth says “The notion of privacy remains out of the grasp of every
academic chasing it. Even when it is cornered by such additional modifiers as "our" privacy,
it still finds a way to remain elusive.”5 Colin Bennett notes that “attempts to define the
concept of ‘privacy’ have generally not met with any success”.6 Legal scholars James
Whitman and Daniel Solove have respectively described privacy as “an unusually slippery
concept”7, and “a concept in disarray. Nobody can articulate what it means”8. Furthermore,
Debbie Kaspar notes that “scholars have a famously difficult time pinning down the meaning
of such a widely used term [and] …most introduce their work by citing this difficulty”.9
Helen Nissenbaum has argued that privacy is best understood though a notion of “contextual
integrity”, where it is not the sharing of information that is a problem, rather it is the sharing
of information outside of socially agreed contextual boundaries.10 Political scientists have
also discussed privacy in relation to state power, arguing that privacy has to be understood in
connection to the other political rights that it allows individuals to exercise by protecting
autonomy.11 Others have focused on the economics of privacy, discussing how privacy is
threaded through economic inequality, capitalism and private property. Christian Fuchs
argues that in the economic context privacy is beneficial to companies and wealthy
individuals because it masks income inequality, while privacy is simultaneously undermined
by these very same companies who seek to control workers and consumers.12 Feminist
scholars have traced the ways in which appeals to privacy have been used to supported and
reinforce gender inequality.13 Still other scholars have pointed out that privacy has a social
value as well and, indeed, is a bedrock of democracy itself.14 Gutwirth explains why: privacy
is “a cornerstone of contemporary Western society because it affects individual self-
determination; the autonomy of relationships; behavioural independence; existential choices
4 David Lyon, Surveillance after September 11 (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2003).
5 Serge Gutwirth, Privacy and the information age (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), 30.
6 Colin J. Bennett, Regulating Privacy: Data Protection and Public Policy in Europe and the United States
(Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press, 1992).
7 James Q. Whitman, “The Two Western Cultures of Privacy: Dignity Versus Liberty,” The Yale Law Journal
113 (2004): 1153-54.
8 Solove, 12. Solove believes that privacy is not one thing, that there is no common dominator. We can agree
with that in so far as we have identified seven types of privacy. However, we believe that there is a common
denominator and that common denominator is the ill-defined notion of privacy itself. While we agree with
Gutwirth, Priscilla Regan and others who say that privacy has a social value, privacy at its core relates to the
integrity and autonomy of the individual, so that when privacy is compromised no matter what type of privacy
the individual is being harmed in some way.
9 Debbie V. S. Kaspar, “The Evolution (or Devolution) of Privacy,” Sociological Forum 20 (2005): 72.
10 Helen Nissenbaum, “Privacy as Contextual Integrity”, Washington Law Review, 79:1 (2004), 101-139.
11 Benjamin J. Goold, “Surveillance and the Political Value of Privacy,Amsterdam Law Forum 1 (2009): 5.
12 Christian Fuchs, “Towards an alternative concept of privacy,Journal of Information, Communication and
Ethics in Society 9 (2011): 232.
13 Catharine A. MacKinnon, Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law (Cambridge MA: Harvard
University Press, 1987).
14 The Supreme Court of Canada has stated that “society has come to realize that privacy is at the heart of liberty
in a modern state.R. v. Dyment (188), 55 D.L.R. (4th) 503 at 513 (S.C.C.). On the social value of privacy, see,
for example, Priscilla M. Regan, Legislating Privacy: Technology, Social Values, and Public Policy, (Chapel
Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1995), 220-231; Alan Westin, “Social and Political Dimensions of
Privacy,” Journal of Social Issues, 59: 2 (2003), 431-453; Valerie Steeves, Reclaiming the social value of
privacy”, in Ian Kerr, Valerie Steeves and Carole Lucock (eds.), Lessons from the Identity Trail: Anonymity,
Privacy and Identity in a Networked Society (Oxford University Press, 2009).
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and the development of one's self; spiritual peace of mind and the ability to resist power and
behavioural manipulation.”15
Although a widely accepted definition of privacy remains elusive, there has been more
consensus on a recognition that privacy comprises multiple dimensions, and some privacy
theorists have attempted to create taxonomies of privacy problems, intrusions or categories.
For example, Solove asserts that privacy is best understood as a “family of different yet
related things”16. Solove arrives at this conclusion by outlining a taxonomy of privacy
problems that must be addressed, regardless of whether they conform to a precise definition
of privacy. His taxonomy includes problems related to information collection, such as
surveillance or interrogation, problems associated with information processing, including
aggregation, data insecurity, potential identification, secondary use and exclusion,
information dissemination, including exposure, disclosure breach of confidentiality, etc. and
invasion, such as issues related to intrusion and decisional interference.17 A typology of
privacy intrusions is also offered by Debbie Kaspar, who argues that privacy cannot be
understood unless examined from the inside. Kaspar distinguishes between invasions
involving extraction, observation and intrusion.18 Extraction-based privacy invasions involve
making a deliberate effort to obtain something from a person. Observation-based privacy
invasions are characterised by active and on-going surveillance of a person, while intrusion-
based invasions involve an “unwelcome presence or interference” in a person’s life.19
However, these scholars’ focus on the ways in which privacy can be infringed and the legal
problem which must be solved is largely reactive. They focus on specific harms which are
already occurring and which must be stopped, rather than over-arching protections that
should be instituted to prevent harms. The difference between a taxonomy of privacy harms
and a taxonomy of types of privacy is the pro-active, protective nature of the latter. It’s the
difference between outlawing murder and adopting a right to life. Murder is only one way in
which life can be undermined, and a simple prohibition against murder would enable the
dissolution of safety principles, etc. Instead, a positive right to life forces individuals,
governments and other organisations to evaluate how their activities may impact upon a right
to life and introduce protective measures.
Roger Clarke’s human-centred approach to defining categories of privacy does assist in
outlining what specific elements of privacy are important and must be protected. Clarke’s
four categories of privacy, outlined in 1997, include privacy of the person, privacy of
personal data, privacy of personal behaviour and privacy of personal communication.20
Privacy of the person has also been referred to as “bodily privacy” and is specifically related
to the integrity of a person’s body. It would include protections against physical intrusions,
including torture, medical treatment, the “compulsory provision of samples of body fluids
and body tissue” and imperatives to submit to biometric measurement. For Clarke, privacy of
the person is thread through many medical and surveillance technologies and practices.
Privacy of personal behaviour includes a protection against the disclosure of sensitive
15 Gutwirth, Privacy and the information age.
16 Solove, Understanding Privacy, 9.
17 Daniel Solve, “‘I’ve Got Nothing to Hide’ and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy,” San Diego Law Review
44 (2007): 758.
18 Kaspar, Evolution of Privacy, 76.
19 Ibid.
20 Roger Clarke, “Introduction to Dataveillance and Information Privacy, and Definitions of Terms”, Xamax
Consultancy, Aug 1997. http://www.rogerclarke.com/DV/Intro.html
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personal matters such as religious practices, sexual practices or political activities. Clarke
notes that there is a space element included within privacy of personal behaviour, where
people have a right to private space to carry out particular activities, as well as a right to be
free from systematic monitoring in public space. Privacy of personal communication refers to
a restriction on monitoring telephone, e-mail and virtual communications as well as face-to-
face communications through hidden microphones. Finally, privacy of personal data refers to
data protection issues. Clarke adds that, with the close coupling that has occurred between
computing and communications, particularly since the 1980s, the last two aspects have
become closely linked, and are commonly referred to as “information privacy”.
3 SEVEN TYPES OF PRIVACY
Despite the utility of these four categories, recent technological advances have meant that
they are no longer adequate to capture the range of potential privacy issues which must be
addressed. Specifically, technologies such as whole body imaging scanners, RFID-enabled
travel documents, unmanned aerial vehicles, second-generation DNA sequencing
technologies, human enhancement technologies and second-generation biometrics raise
additional privacy issues, which necessitate an expansion of Clarke’s four categories. We will
use these new and emerging technologies to argue for an expansion to seven different types
of privacy, including privacy of the person, privacy of behaviour and action, privacy of
personal communication, privacy of data and image, privacy of thoughts and feelings,
privacy of location and space and privacy of association (including group privacy).21
Although these seven types of privacy may have some overlaps, they are discussed
individually because they provide a number of different lenses through which to view the
effects of case study technologies. In this section, we briefly outline each of these seven types
of privacy before linking them with relevant information from new and emerging
technologies in the next section.
Privacy of the person encompasses the right to keep body functions and body characteristics
(such as genetic codes and biometrics) private. According to Mordini, the human body has a
strong symbolic dimension as the result of the integration of the physical body and the mind
and is “unavoidably invested with cultural values”.22 Privacy of the person is thought to be
conducive to individual feelings of freedom and helps to support a healthy, well-adjusted
democratic society. This aspect of privacy is shared with Clarke’s categorisation.
We extend Clarke’s notion of privacy of personal behaviour to privacy of behaviour and
action. This concept includes sensitive issues such as sexual preferences and habits, political
activities and religious practices. However, the notion of privacy of personal behaviour
concerns activities that happen in public space, as well as private space, and Clarke makes a
distinction between casual observation of behaviour by a few nearby people in a public space
with the systematic recording and storage of information about those activities.23 The ability
to behave in public, semi-public or one’s private space without having actions monitored or
21 These seven types of privacy were first elaborated in an annex prepared for the PRESCIENT D1 report,
available at http://www.prescient-project.eu/prescient/inhalte/download/PRESCIENT-D1---final.pdf
22 Emilio Mordini, Whole Body Imaging at airport checkpoints: the ethical and political context, in Towards
Responsible Research and Innovation in the Information and Communication Technologies and Security
Technologies Fields, ed. René von Schomberg (Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union,
2011).
23 Clarke, “Introduction to Dataveillance”.
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controlled by others contributes to “the development and exercise of autonomy and freedom
in thought and action”.24
Privacy of communication aims to avoid the interception of communications, including mail
interception, the use of bugs, directional microphones, telephone or wireless communication
interception or recording and access to e-mail messages. This right is recognised by many
governments through requirements that wiretapping or other communication interception
must be overseen by a judicial or other authority. This aspect of privacy benefits individuals
and society because it enables and encourages a free discussion of a wide range of views and
options, and enables growth in the communications sector.
We expand Clarke’s category of privacy of personal data to include the capture of images as
these are considered a type of personal data by the European Union as part of the 1995 Data
Protection Directive as well as other sources. This privacy of data and image includes
concerns about making sure that individuals’ data is not automatically available to other
individuals and organisations and that people can “exercise a substantial degree of control
over that data and its use”.25 Such control over personal data builds self-confidence and
enables individuals to feel empowered. Like privacy of thought and feelings, this aspect of
privacy has social value in that it addresses the balance of power between the state and the
person.
Our case studies reveal that new and emerging technologies carry the potential to impact on
individuals’ privacy of thoughts and feelings. People have a right not to share their thoughts
or feelings or to have those thoughts or feeling revealed. Individuals should have the right to
think whatever they like. Such creative freedom benefits society because it relates to the
balance of power between the state and the individual.26 This aspect of privacy may be
coming under threat as a direct result of new and emerging technologies.27 Privacy of thought
and feelings can be distinguished from privacy of the person, in the same way that the mind
can be distinguished from the body. Similarly, we can (and do) distinguish between thought,
feelings and behaviour. Thought does not automatically translate into behaviour. Similarly,
one can behave thoughtlessly (as many people often do).
According to our conception of privacy of location and space, individuals have the right to
move about in public or semi-public space without being identified, tracked or monitored.
This conception of privacy also includes a right to solitude and a right to privacy in spaces
such as the home, the car or the office. Such a conception of privacy has social value. When
citizens are free to move about public space without fear of identification, monitoring or
tracking, they experience a sense of living in a democracy and experiencing freedom. Both
these subjective feelings contribute to a healthy, well-adjusted democracy. Furthermore, they
encourage dissent and freedom of assembly, both of which are essential to a healthy
democracy. This categorisation of privacy was also not as obviously under threat when
Clarke was writing in 1997, however, this has changed with technological advances.
The final type of privacy that we identify, privacy of association (including group
privacy), is concerned with people’s right to associate with whomever they wish, without
24 Helen Nissenbaum, Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy and the Integrity of Social Life (Stanford CA:
Stanford University Press, 2010), 82.
25 Clarke, “Introduction to Dataveillance”.
26 Goold, “Surveillance and the Political Value of Privacy”.
27 See Dara Hallinan and Paul De Hert, “Neurodata Based Devices and Data Protection”, 2012 [forthcoming].
Page 6
being monitored. This has long been recognised as desirable (necessary) for a democratic
society as it fosters freedom of speech, including political speech, freedom of worship and
other forms of association. Society benefits from this aspect of privacy in that a wide variety
of interest groups will be fostered, which may help to ensure that marginalised voices, some
of whom will press for more political or economic change, are heard. This aspect of privacy
was not considered by Clarke, and a number of new technologies outlined below could
negatively impact upon individuals’ privacy of association.
One might question what the difference is between privacy of location and space or privacy
of association and privacy of behaviour. Privacy of location means that a person is entitled to
move through physical space, to travel where she wants without being tracked and monitored.
Privacy of behaviour means the person has a right to behave as she wants (to sleep in class, to
wear funny clothes) so long as the behaviour does not harm someone else. Privacy of
behaviour does not necessarily have anything to do with a person travelling through space,
driving to work, going shopping or whatever. One can behave as one wants in private,
separately from others. Privacy of association differs from privacy of behaviour because it is
not only about groups or organisations (e.g., political parties, trade unions, religious groups,
etc.) to which we choose to belong, privacy of association also connects to groupings or
profiles over which we have no control – for example, DNA testing can revealing that we are
members of a particular ethnic group or a particular family. Privacy of association directly
relates to other fundamental rights such as freedom of religion, freedom of assembly, etc.,
from which privacy of behaviour and action (as we define it) are a step removed.
Our typology of privacy (or, rather, our expansion of Clarke’s typology) offers various
benefits to a range of stakeholders. It is important above all in policy terms, i.e., policy-
makers should ensure that these different types of privacy are adequately protected in
legislation, i.e., it is not sufficient to protect only personal data and personal communications
(e.g., against interception). This typology is also of instrumental value in the development of
a privacy impact assessment methodology in Europe (as is being done in the EC-funded
PIAF28, PRESCIENT29 and SAPIENT30 projects, for example). Similarly, organisations that
carry out privacy impact assessments should be concerned not only about privacy of personal
data and privacy of communications, but also the other types of privacy as well. We also
believe our typology provides academics and other privacy experts with a useful, logical,
well-structured and coherent typology in which to frame their privacy studies. Our typology
is similarly useful for privacy advocates. Although a widely accepted definition of privacy
has proven elusive, this typology, firmly building on that established by Clarke, should be
widely accepted.
4 PRIVACY IMPACTS OF NEW AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
In this section, we discuss six new and emerging technologies and their potential impact upon
the seven different types of privacy outlined above. We use whole body imaging scanners,
RFID-enabled travel documents, unmanned aircraft systems (drones), second-generation
DNA sequencing, human enhancement technologies and second-generation biometrics to
illustrate the need to expand Clarke’s four categories. For each technology, we examine what
types of privacy they could infringe upon. We demonstrate that different technologies impact
upon different types of privacy and that technological developments can introduce new and
28 www.piafproject.eu
29 www.prescient-project.eu
30 www.sapientproject.eu
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unforeseen facets of privacy. We also analyse these several new and emerging technologies
in terms of their impact on one or more different types of privacy in order to assist policy-
makers in understanding these new additional types of privacy and in devising protections
that address all of these different types.
4.1 WHOLE BODY IMAGING SCANNERS
Whole body imaging scanners seek to address the fact that current technologies and
screenings, such as walk-through metal detectors and hand searches, have deficiencies in
detecting some types of threats, and that law enforcement and security staff need tools to
enable them to deal with threats from explosives and non-metallic weapons.31 Whole body
imaging scanners, or body scanners, provide one possible means of reducing the threat from
non-metallic weapons. Body scanners “produce an image of the body of a person showing
whether or not objects are hidden in or under his clothes” by using x-ray backscatter or
millimetre waves.32 Given the sensitive nature of the images produced by body scanners,
critics have raised privacy concerns in relation to their mass deployment, particularly at large
airports, including the revealing of individuals’ naked bodies and medical conditions and the
protection of individuals’ data and images. These concerns largely align with Clarke’s
understanding of bodily privacy, privacy of behaviour and action and privacy of personal
data. However, these scanners generate images that we regard as part of personal data.
Bodily privacy concerns raised by body scanners have mainly centred on two key issues, the
revealing of individuals’ naked bodies and revealing information about medical conditions. In
terms of revealing naked bodies, privacy advocates argue that this loss of privacy is
disproportionate to any gains in security. Academics, privacy advocates, politicians and
journalists have all warned that the images resulting from the different types of body scanners
currently deployed in airports and other contexts reveal an individual’s “naked body”,
including “the form, shape and size of genitals, buttocks and female breasts”.33 The issue of
“naked images” has also raised questions surrounding child protection laws, and the
Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) has argued that the capacity for viewing,
storage and recall of images of children may contravene child protection laws.34 According to
privacy advocates, the images also show details of medical conditions that may be
embarrassing for individuals. In 2002, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) asserted
that “passengers expect privacy underneath their clothing and should not be required to
display highly personal details of their bodies…as a pre-requisite to boarding a plane”.35
Despite these concerns, authorities, such as the UK Department for Transport, have argued
that any loss of body privacy is proportionate and legitimate in relation to the security
concerns that body scanners address.36
31 Silvia Venier, “Global Mobility and Security,” Biometric Technology Today 5 (2009).
32 European Commission, Consultation: The impact of the use of body scanners in the field of aviation security
on human rights, privacy, personal dignity, health and data protection, Brussels, 19 February 2009.
33 Demetrius Klitou, “Backscatter body scanners A strip search by other means,” Computer Law & Security
Report 24 (2008): 317.
34 Electronic Privacy Information Center, “Transportation Agency's Plan to X-Ray Travelers Should Be Stripped
of Funding,” Last modified June 2005, http://epic.org/privacy/surveillance/spotlight/0605/.
35 American Civil Liberties Union, “The ACLU's view on body scanners”, Last modified 15 March 2002,
http://www.aclu.org/technology-and-liberty/body-scanners.
36 Department for Transport, Impact Assessment on the use of security scanners at UK airports, Last modified
Mar 29 2001. http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.dft.gov.uk/consultations/open/2010-23/.
Page 8
Images generated from body scanners could also reveal information about behaviour such as
augmentation surgeries or medical related practices. For example, the ACLU has argued that
body scanners reveal medical or lifestyle behaviour such as evidence of mastectomies,
colostomy appliances, penile implants and/or catheter tubes, and thus provide details about
individual behaviour. In terms of body imaging scanners, the issues related to privacy of
behaviour and action significantly overlap with bodily privacy, however, the two are separate
in the sense that it is the activities revealed by the images which individuals wish to conceal
rather than the bodies or images themselves.
Concerns around data protection and data privacy revolve around protection of personal data
that the scanners generate, including the storage and transmission of images. According to the
US Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) the scanners used in US airports do not
store, print or transmit images.37 However, a Freedom of Information Act request by EPIC to
the TSA found that machines come with the capability to store and transmit images, but this
is disabled when they are deployed to airports.38 EPIC argues that the fact that this capability
could be re-enabled represents a data protection risk to passengers.39 EPIC further notes that
the TSA does not have a stellar reputation for protecting passenger data.40 Privacy
International is also concerned that some employees operating scanners will experience an
“irresistible pull” to store or transmit images if a “celebrity or someone with an unusual...
body goes through the system”.41 In fact, images from body imaging scanners have been
posted on the Internet in a breach of the fundamental rights of thousands of people in the
USA.42 However, despite the link between body imaging scanners and privacy of personal
data, the body scanners example makes clear that Clarke’s conception of personal data needs
to be expanded to include images as personal data.43 Thus, data protection laws control the
unauthorised storage, transfer and disclosure of personal data, precisely the issues of concerns
that are expressed in relation to the images produced by body imaging scanners.
4.2 RFID-ENABLED TRAVEL DOCUMENTS
RFID-enabled travel documents include travel cards, such as Oyster Cards in London, which
integrate RFID technology with the use of mass transportation in urban areas and RFID-
enabled passports, also called e-passports, which are currently being introduced in most
countries. Such RFID-enabled travel documents raise privacy concerns within the categories
37 Ki Mae Heussner, “Air Security: Could Technology Have Stopped Christmas Attack?,” ABC News, 29
December 2009. http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/AheadoftheCurve/air-security-technology-stopped-xmas-
attack/story?id=9436877.
38 Kim Zetter, “Airport Scanners Can Store, Transmit Images,” Wired News, 11 January 2010.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/01/airport-scanners/.
39 Philip Rucker, “US airports say seeing is believing as passengers face body-scan drill,” Sydney Morning
Herald, 5 January 2010. http://www.smh.com.au/travel/travel-news/us-airports-say-seeing-is-believing-as-
passengers-face-bodyscan-drill-20100104-lq6o.html.
40 EPIC, “Transportation Agency's Plan to X-Ray Travelers Should Be Stripped of Funding”.
41 Privacy International, “PI statement on proposed deployments of body scanners in airports”, Last modified 31
December 2009. https://www.privacyinternational.org/article/pi-statement-proposed-deployments-body-
scanners-airports
42 European Economic and Social Committee, Opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee on the
Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on the Use of Security
Scanners at EU airports, COM(2010) 311 final, Brussels, 16 February 2011, 4.
43 Even if the images are anonymised, this would not legitimate the circulation of such images. Circulation of
such images without the authorisation of the person whose image was captured would be either illegal or
morally repugnant or both.
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of privacy of behaviour and action, privacy of data and image and privacy of location and
space.
Privacy of behaviour and action can be negatively impacted by RFID-enabled travel
documents, in that people’s behaviours and travel activities can be reconstructed or inferred
from information generated as a result of their use of these technologies. Travel routes,
frequent destinations and mode of transport can be gleaned from information available on
both e-passport databases and travel card databases. Location, time and other information
stored on databases can be combined, which police have used to check the whereabouts or
movements of suspects’ during criminal investigations.44 Furthermore, aggregated
information can provide details that enable travellers’ routines to be inferred. This can also
materialise into a mistaken identity threat in that the association between an individual and a
tag can be spurious (e.g., if the travel card or passport is stolen or given to another person),
but the initial association is difficult to break once it is made.45
The relative (in)security of personal information on databases represents a threat to personal
data protection. RFID systems are composed of tags, readers and back-end databases. In
RFID-enabled travel cards, the unique identifier on the chip is linked with personal
information (e.g., if a person pays for the card by credit card, London Underground will have
a record of all your travels and travel times). In RFID-enabled passports, the personal
information stored on the chip can also be compromised by being read directly and without
authorisation from the chip. Unauthorised reading may take place in public space, can occur
without the passport holder’s knowledge, and can violate data protection principles in that it
can be used to reveal an individual’s personal details, biometric information and/or their
citizenship. Although basic protection measures such as access codes and Faraday cages46 are
built into e-passports to prevent unauthorised reading, Gellert and Gutwirth argue that these
measures do not provide adequate protection47 and do not possess the desired long-term
security needed for e-passport applications (their validity is estimated to a maximum of 10
years).48 Systems that store personal data, including biometric data, in back-end databases
may also be vulnerable to data protection threats such as hacking, unauthorised access or
unauthorised disclosure. Some systems have attempted to protect individuals from this threat
by separating personal information from the RFID chip in the e-passport.49 However, the
resulting databases which store the sensitive personal information could represent a
vulnerability. Finally, the unauthorised use of personal information also represents a privacy
threat. In terms of RFID-enabled travel cards, marketing staff can target individuals based on
the personal data they are required to submit in an application form and companies could
44 “Oyster data use rises in crime clampdown”, The Guardian, 13 March 2006.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2006/mar/13/news.freedomofinformation and Octopus Holdings
Limited, “Customer Data Protection”.
45 Marc Langheinrich, “A survey of RFID privacy approaches,” Personal and Ubiquitous Computing 13 (2009):
414.
46 Faraday cages are a metallic shielding embedded in the passport cover and designed to protect it from
electronic eavesdropping.
47 Faraday cages do not prevent eavesdropping on legitimate conversations between readers and tags, and basic
access codes could enable counterfeiting, since a forger could splice together a valid electronic signature with
false identity information and biometric components.
48 Raphael Gellert and Serge Gutwirth, “Privacy, data protection and policy issues in RFID enabled e-
passports,” in Privacy, data protection and ethical issues in new and emerging technologies: Five case studies,
eds. Rachel Finn and David Wright, 25 November 2011.
49 Marc van Lieshout, et al., RFID Technologies: Emerging Issues, Challenges and Policy Options, Office for
Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg, 2007, 197.
Page 10
aggregate these pieces of information to construct sophisticated consumer profiles.50 This is
especially true if contactless travel cards are expanded for use as payment for other small
items.
Privacy of location and space is another aspect of privacy that is potentially undermined by
RFID-enabled travel documents. Both RFID-enabled travel cards and e-passports carry the
potential for a location threat, whereby individuals’ movements can be monitored based on
the RFID signature of their documents. Langheinrich argues that once a tag is associated with
a particular person, the presence of the tag implies a location disclosure.51 Information about
where an individual has been can also be accessed after the fact using information on
databases that store information about when and where documents have been read. While this
information could be useful for the individual concerned in terms of billing or payment
disputes, it may also harm individuals whose location information is revealed to third parties.
Travellers may also be vulnerable to hotlisting, which consists of compiling all the available
information concerning an individual, so that when an identifier is detected it can be linked to
all the other information available concerning this particular individual.52 In consequence,
authorities could be informed that a travel document connected to a particular individual, or
an individual with particular characteristics, has been read in a particular place at a particular
time. This generalised threat materialises into specific threats, such as stalking53 or
unauthorised location disclosures to spouses, or other individuals.54 However, in most places,
police or other authorities must obtain a search warrant or court order in order to be given
access to the data.55 Finally, the RFID signals in passports or travel cards may also be
tracked, since most RFID tags are standardised and will broadcast their signal to any
compatible reader. This means that an individual could read an RFID chip’s unique identifier,
store it and follow its signal as long as the RFID reader is within range of the RFID-
embedded travel card.
4.3 UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS
Despite a slow increase in the introduction of UASs in civil applications, such as law
enforcement, border patrol and other regulatory surveillance, the use of unmanned aircraft
systems (UASs or drones) has generated relatively muted debate about privacy and data
protection. Privacy is notable by its absence in many discussions about UAS devices, which
may be partly explained by their current similarity to existing forms of surveillance such as
CCTV surveillance or surveillance by police helicopter. However, the lack of noise and
relative invisibility of UASs mean that individuals do not know if they are being monitored
and UAS surveillance may often occur covertly.56 Our discussion demonstrates that UASs
raise issues of privacy of behaviour and action, privacy of data and image, privacy of location
and space and privacy of association.
50 Lara Srivastava, “Radio frequency identification: ubiquity for humanity,” info 9 (2007).
51 Langheinrich, “RFID privacy approaches”.
52 A. Juels, D. Molnar and D. Wagner, “Security and Privacy Issues in E-passports,” in Proceedings of
IEEE/Create-net SecureComm 2005, (Los Angeles CA: IEEE Computer Society Press, 2005), 79.
53 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, “RFID Guidance and Reports”, OECD Digital
Economy Papers 152 (Paris: OECD publishing, 2008), 42.
54 Steve Bloomfield, “How an Oyster Card can Ruin your Marriage,” The Independent on Sunday, 19 February
2006. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/how-an-oyster-card-could-ruin-your-marriage-
467077.html
55 Octopus Holdings Limited, “Customer Data Protection”, 2009.
56 Rachel L. Finn and David Wright, “Unmanned aircraft systems: Surveillance, ethics and privacy in civil
applications,” Computer Law and Security Review 28:2 (2012).
Page 11
With surveillance-oriented drones, everyone is monitored regardless of whether their
activities warrant suspicion; therefore, all behaviours are monitored and recorded. This
potential for negative impacts on privacy of behaviour and action is particularly significant
since UAS surveillance is much less overt than CCTV or helicopter surveillance to which it
has been compared. The potential to use surveillance covertly means that in order to protect
themselves from the negative effects of intrusions, individuals must assume they are being
surveilled at all times and attempt to adjust their behaviour accordingly. This could introduce
anticipatory conformity (a “chilling effect”) where individuals alter their behaviour because
they believe they may be under surveillance.57
UAS surveillance potentially infringes upon privacy of data and image in that it can generate
images of individuals, sometimes covertly. This means that data protection principles
contained in the 1995 Data Protection Directive (as well as the proposed Data Protection
Regulation58) such as transparency, consent and rights of access can be undermined, because
individuals may not even realise that they are subject to UAS surveillance at any given
moment. Therefore, potentially covert data capture also leaves individuals with a limited
ability to exercise privacy by taking “measures to keep private those activities that they do
not wish to expose to public view”.59 One particular group who could be disproportionately
affected by deployments of UASs in civil air space are celebrities whom paparazzi or other
media could target with drones.
UAS devices can infringe upon privacy of location and space in that they can be used to track
people or undermine their expectations regarding the boundaries of personal space. These
surveillance devices can capture images of a person or a vehicle in public space, thereby
placing individuals in particular places at particular times or revealing their movements
through public space if more than one image is captured. UASs may also reveal information
about private spaces such as back yards or, when flying low, can even transmit images of
activities captured within homes, offices or other apparently private spaces. Thus, individuals
who assume that their activities are not being monitored because they occur within the home
or within private property may find that this assumption is false. The fact that this
surveillance can be covert makes the capture of this information particularly problematic.
UAS devices may impact upon privacy of association through their ability to monitor
individuals and crowds, again, sometimes covertly. Unmanned aircraft systems can generate
information about groups or individuals with whom they associate. For example, at protests
or other large gatherings of people, the number and organisation of individuals can be
analysed, and group membership can be inferred. If UAS visual surveillance was combined
with biometrics such as facial recognition technology, individual group membership and
affiliation could be discovered. Furthermore, group activities can also be identified or
analysed, for example, place and time of meetings and activities at meetings.
4.4 SECOND-GENERATION DNA SEQUENCING TECHNOLOGIES
57 Paul McBride, “Beyond Orwell: The Application of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Domestic Surveillance
Operations,” Journal of Air Law and Commerce 74 (2009): 659.
58 European Commission, Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data
(General Data Protection Regulation), COM(2012) 11 final, Brussels, 2012.
59 McBride, “Beyond Orwell”, 661.
Page 12
Second-generation DNA sequencing technologies refer to the routine sequencing of the
whole genomes of individuals rather than just distinct parts of the genome. Second-
generation DNA sequencing impacts on the privacy of the person through the collection of
intimate information that can potentially reveal personal data that are classified as sensitive.
DNA sequences can reveal sensitive information about an individual and may indicate
specific human qualities such as sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, physical and mental health
and predispositions to certain behaviours.60 These categories are often associated with social
marginalisation and discrimination, and revealing these traits can have significant impacts in
terms of privacy of data and image. If this data is routinely revealed, individuals could
become vulnerable to the consequences of genetic testing or could be effectively forced to
undergo genetic testing in order to obtain insurance, employment or access to other goods
and services.61 These consequences could affect the individuals as well as their family
members, due to the heritability of genetic information. As a result, second-generation DNA
sequencing can impact upon privacy of the person, privacy of data and image, privacy of
location and space and privacy of association.
Second-generation DNA sequencing impacts on the privacy of the person through the
collection of intimate information that can potentially reveal personal data that are classified
as sensitive. Currently, some police forces, such as those in the UK, are able to use
reasonable force to take a DNA sample from arrested individuals, and military personnel in
the USA are only able to refuse to submit a DNA sample for serious religious reasons.62
While in these cases the taking of DNA samples does not take place on the basis of a mutual
consent, this may change in the near future. Setting up biobanks for biomedical research
involves the recruitment of large population cohorts and whole genome DNA sequencing will
likely become a routine diagnostic test method in some areas of health care (e.g., for prenatal
diagnosis). These examples suggest that consent could gradually become undermined as
mandatory volunteerism becomes more commonplace.63
Second-generation DNA sequencing technologies potentially infringe upon the privacy of a
person’s data or image. As highlighted above, the information generated by DNA sequencing
can potentially reveal sensitive data that increases the potential for genetic discrimination by
government, insurers, employers, schools, banks and others.64 Furthermore, despite the
assumption that genetic data in databases can be rendered anonymous, it is possible that
individuals could be identified65, with all of the associated consequences. Lunshof et al.
identify several avenues through which individuals could be de-anonymised, including:
Inferring phenotype from genotype by identifying information in DNA and RNA, for
instance, stature, hair or iris colour, or skin colour, or ethnic group
Any amount of DNA data in the public domain with a name allows for identification
within any anonymised data set
60 “DNA confidential”, Nature Biotechnology 27 (2009): 777.
61 Piret Kukk, Bärbel Hüsing and Michael Friedewald, “Privacy, data protection and policy issues in next
generation DNA sequencing technologies,” Privacy, data protection and ethical issues in new and emerging
technologies: Five case studies, eds. Rachel Finn and David Wright, 25 November 2011.
62 Dorothy Nelkin and Lori Andrews, “DNA identication and surveillance creep,” Sociology of Health &
Illness 21 (1999).
63 Gary T. Marx, Soft Surveillance: The Growth of Mandatory Volunteerism in Collecting Personal
Information‘Hey Buddy Can You Spare a DNA?’,in Surveillance and Security: Technological Politics and
Power in Everyday Life, ed. T. Monahan (London: Routledge, 2006).
64 Kukk et al., “Next-generation DNA sequencing”.
65 L. Curren, et al., “Identifiability, genomics and UK data protection law,” European Journal of Health Law 17
(2010).
Page 13
Security breaches based on attacks on or thefts or loss of DNA data.66
As such, like many other emerging technologies, the link between individuals and a “data
set” requires a significant amount of attention to data protection mechanisms in order to
protect privacy.
Whole genome DNA sequencing can negatively impact on privacy of location and space.
This is primarily centred on concerns over the potential for detecting someone’s location by
comparing the DNA sample found at a specific location and people’s DNA profiles. This can
be grounds for making associations between persons and their location, especially within
forensics. It also introduces a possibility for making spurious associations between
individuals and particular locations as a result of secondary transfers as this technology
becomes more sensitive. Although whole genome sequencing is an emerging technology still
in the research domain, the recent advent of low copy number DNA techniques67 have led to
mistakes in the criminal justice system, including false positive matches that suggested an
individual’s presence in a particular location68 and matches resulting from secondary
transfers associated with contamination.69
Finally, second-generation whole genome sequencing potentially impacts upon privacy of
association in negative ways. An individual’s presence at a particular gathering could be
detected through linking a person’s DNA profile with DNA found at that location.
Individuals could be categorised into particular groups based on information gleaned from
their DNA sequence, and profiling enables individuals within particular groups to be
identified. Furthermore, in addition to identification, but in a similar frame, whole genome
DNA sequencing could allow the use of DNA of one family member to provide information
about another. For example, whole genome sequencing could identify when people are
related and reveal information about whether another family member has committed a crime
or if they are likely to be carriers for particular diseases, etc.70
4.5 HUMAN ENHANCEMENT
Human enhancement technologies include those which offer enhancement via
pharmacological means, i.e., neuro-enhancing pharmaceuticals (neuro-enhancers), or
technical means via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs)71. Neuro-enhancing pharmaceuticals
are characterised by their biological and chemical effects, and pharmaceutical neuro-
enhancement comprises not only illegal drugs (amphetamines or cocaine), but also
prescription and over-the-counter drugs such as aspirin and prescription drugs such as
antidepressants, methylphenidate (Ritalin) and Aspirin. However, prescription drugs such as
Ritalin may be misused or intentionally used for other purposes than the prescribed ones. The
two most important categorisations of BCIs, particularly in relation to their privacy
66 J.E. Lunshof et al., “From genetic privacy to open consent,Nature Reviews Genetics 9 (2008).
67 Wikipedia defines Low Copy Number (LCN) as a DNA profiling technique developed by the Forensic
Science Service (FSS) and in use in some countries since 1999.
68 Rebecca Fowler, “Coded Revelations: DNA the second revolution”, The Observer, 27 April 2003.
69 Alan Hall, “Woman serial killer was a just phantom, German police admit,The Telegraph, 26 March 2009.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/5056339/Woman-serial-killer-was-a-just-
phantom-German-police-admit.html.
70 Dustin Hays and DNA Policy Centre, “DNA, Forensics, and the Law”, Last modified 2008.
http://www.dnapolicy.org/policy.issue.php?action=detail&issuebrief_id=42.
71 Philip Schütz and Michael Friedewald, “Technologies for Human Enhancement and their impact on privacy,”
in Privacy, data protection and ethical issues in new and emerging technologies: Five case studies, eds. Rachel
Finn and David Wright, 25 November 2011.
Page 14
invasiveness, is their location (invasive vs. non-invasive) and whether they operate from
human to machine and/or vice versa. Although machine-to-human operation can be found in
medical applications such as deep brain stimulation, most BCI technology operates from
human to machine and is used to enable the user to control other digital or mechanical
devices without the actual need of any neuro-muscular movement. Electroencephalography
(EEG) that measures the electrical impulses emitted by the brain is the most prevalent sensing
technology, and applications such as the mental typewriter or brain-to-robot interfaces are
currently primarily being developed for therapeutic purposes. However, such technology
could become more prevalent since the gaming and entertainment industry has recently
shown an interest in the “reading” of brain activity to control and manipulate applications.72
These human enhancement technologies carry the potential to impact upon privacy of the
person, privacy of behaviour and action, privacy of communication, privacy of data and
image and privacy of thoughts and feelings.
Human enhancement may violate privacy of the person, both through neuro-enhancing
pharmaceuticals and brain-computer interfaces, when the method of enhancement implies the
internalisation of substances or technologies and/or a potential loss of control. On the one
hand, Schütz and Friedewald argue that pharmaceutical neuro-enhancers enable the
prescribing authority to exercise control over the recipient, affecting his/her bodily privacy.73
On the other hand, BCI technology is based on both human and machine learning processes,
which means that it could be possible to manipulate the BCI user.74 Thus, Schütz and
Friedewald further argue that any gain in control through the use of BCIs could easily be
offset by a potential for loss of control. This confronts the user with unintended and
potentially devastating consequences, particularly if the individual is dependent on the BCI-
linked technology. For example, Parkinson’s patients using BCIs such as deep brain
stimulation have been confronted with side effects that include a change in their personality.
Human enhancement technologies potentially impact upon privacy of behaviour and action in
two ways. First, as mentioned above, neuro-enhancers are closely linked to the risk of losing
control over one’s will and actions. That is why prescribed “enhancing” drugs such as Ritalin
or Modafinil pose a threat of external control over the individual’s behaviour. Second,
drawing on BCI technology, behavioural neuroscience allows the location of parts of the
brain that are supposed to be responsible for certain kinds of behaviour, attitudes and actions.
In this context, individuals could be exposed to preventive strategies, such as crime
prevention.75 Furthermore, individuals could be influenced to buy certain products, or spend
more money than they otherwise would, based on an interaction between mood, purchasing
behaviour and external stimulation.76
Privacy of communication may be impacted by brain-computer interfaces, whereby the
interception or monitoring of data streams between the BCI user and the machine could be
possible. When BCIs are used to assist individuals in communicating with others, the data
that passes between the user and the communication software could be intercepted and
72 Anton Nijholt, BCI for Games: A 'State of the Art' Survey”, in Entertainment Computing - ICEC 2008, eds.
Scott M. Stevens, and Shirley J. Saldamarco (Berlin: Springer, 2009), 225.
73 Schütz and Friedewald, Technologies for Human Enhancement and their impact on privacy”.
74 Dennis J. McFarland and Jonathan R. Wolpaw, Brain-computer interfaces for communication and control,”
Communications of the ACM 54 (2011): 63.
75 Adam Kepecs, “Neuroscience: My brain made me do it,” Nature 473 (2011).
76 Ira van Keulen and Mirjam Schuijff, “Engineering of The Brain: Neuromodulation and Regulation,” in
Making Perfect Life: Bioengineering in the 21st Century, eds. Rinie van Est and Dirk Stemerding (Brussels:
European Technology Assessment Group, June 2011).
Page 15
analysed. Furthermore, recent scientific research in brain imaging and speech has begun to
identify electrical patterns associated with certain words or phrases.77 As BCIs develop, more
of the content of communication could become vulnerable to interception.
Privacy of data and image is only touched upon in relation to human enhancement
technologies that are capable of collecting data, regardless of how it may be further
processed. As such, BCIs are the only human enhancement technology that potentially
impacts upon privacy of data and image because they involve the digitalisation, collection,
(temporary) storage and processing of information about brain activity. This data is highly
sensitive, because the prospective worth of such unique personal information may increase
exponentially in terms of its marketing value for the advertisement industry. In addition, it is
difficult to anticipate what information can be collected and/or extracted in the future and
whether it will be financially lucrative. Despite this, Schütz and Friedewald note that system
security was given little thought when researchers first developed the technical infrastructure
of BCIs, as was the case in the early days of the Internet. Thus, BCI technologies are
vulnerable to breaches through hacking or other intrusions.78 However, at the moment, this
threat is relatively inconsequential as current BCIs are not designed to extract data, they
merely link individuals with other assistive technologies.
Furthermore, information from brain computer interfaces may be able to recognise and
identify patterns that shed light on certain thoughts and feelings of the carrier. According to
McFarland and Wolpaw, the images created by the brain’s electrical impulses reveal an
enormous depth of information about the individual, his/her mind and way of thinking. “For
the first time it may be possible to breach the privacy of the human mind, and judge people
not only by their actions, but also by their thoughts and predilections.”79 Such technologies
are being explored in relation to counter-terrorism and advertising practices, where, for
example, sensor networks are being deployed in semi-public spaces to detect stress levels to
attempt to identify suspicious behaviour and are being developed for retail situations to
attempt to predict and influence purchasing behaviour. In the counter-terrorism context, such
data could lead to additional questioning or refusal of services, which would impact upon a
person’s privacy of thoughts or feelings. Shoppers could also be influenced in the retail sector
or targeted based on the feelings that they present, leading to discrimination or other profiling
practices. In either context, such technology could encourage individuals to attempt to
conceal thoughts or feelings in anticipation of such measurements since their thoughts or
feelings could become public information.
4.6 SECOND-GENERATION BIOMETRICS
In parallel with their wider deployment, biometrics have raised critical privacy and data
protection issues which have impacted the acceptability of biometric identification methods.
The next generation of biometrics include the measurement and analysis of new biometric
traits, such as behavioural or soft biometrics (i.e., biometrics which may change over time,
such as gait analysis and voice recognition software) and physiological biometrics (including
heartbeat detection, pheromone detection). In second-generation biometrics, these soft or
77 Ian Sample, “Mind-reading program translates brain activity into words, The Guardian, 31 January 2012.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jan/31/mind-reading-program-brain-words
78 Medical Device Security Center, “Medical Device Security Center”, Last modified 2011. http://secure-
medicine.org/.
79 Martha J. Farah, Neuroethics: The practical and the philosophical,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (2005):
34.
Page 16
physiological traits are often used in combination with more traditional traits in multiple
biometrics or multimodal systems to strengthen identification systems. Venier and Mordini
argue that the most critical implications of next-generation biometrics are that future
biometric recognition could take place remotely, covertly and/or from a distance and may
produce material with a high degree of sensitive (and surplus) information.80 However, many
of the applications of second-generation biometrics are still in the research domain and
second-generation biometrics are most appropriately classed as emerging technologies.
Unique to other technologies discussed here, second-generation biometrics affects all of the
seven types of privacy we outline in this article. Some soft biometrics such as the way one
walks (gait) or types a letter could be regarded as unconscious behaviour. However, we
would regard these as still different from privacy of behaviour and action as these possibly
supposed unconscious behaviours reflect a personal characteristic (privacy of the body) rather
than the intentionality that is implicit in privacy of behaviour and action.
In relation to second-generation biometrics, privacy of the person could be impacted by the
systematic collection of information that could be used for classification purposes. Venier
and Mordini argue that second-generation biometrics potentially infringe upon human dignity
through the measurement and digitalisation of the body.81 Second-generation biometrics also
involve the collection of intimate information, which carries the potential to reveal personal
data that are classified as sensitive, including medical data, gender, age and/or ethnicity.
Because of the potential for classification, Venier and Mordini are concerned that the
categorisation of individuals could become a more sensitive issue than identification in terms
of biometrics, as second-generation biometrics may enable subjects to be characterised via
biometric profiling or be used to provide a link to an existing non-biometric profile.82 This
could be exacerbated as more, sometimes superfluous, data is collected by multiple
biometrics and multimodal systems, in order to improve system performance. Furthermore,
the collection of biometric information remotely, covertly and/or at a distance could mean
that individuals’ bodies are routinely measured and mined for information without the
explicit consent of the person who is being monitored.
Soft biometrics potentially impact privacy of behaviour and action through processes of
automation. According to Venier and Mordini, human behaviour can be monitored, captured,
stored and analysed in order to enable systems to become knowledgeable about people.
Subsequently, measurements of changes in behaviour and definitions of “abnormal”
behaviour can also become automated which could lead to monitoring and recording of
infrequent behaviours that are not suspicious or criminally deviant. Physiological biometrics
may also impact privacy of behaviour and action by revealing sensitive information about a
person’s psychological state, which can be used for behaviour prediction, as a result of pre-
emptive discriminatory measures.
Soft biometrics, specifically voice or speech recognition technologies, can negatively impact
individuals’ privacy of personal communications. Speech or voice recognition technologies
can be utilised to record, analyse and disclose the content of communication. Although these
are not the primary purpose of such technologies, the infrastructure necessary to record and
verify human voices or human speech can be relatively easily re-worked to enable such
80 Silvia Venier and Emilio Mordini, “Second-generation biometrics”, in Privacy, data protection and ethical
issues in new and emerging technologies: Five case studies, eds. Rachel Finn and David Wright, 25 November
2011.
81 Venier and Mordini, “Second-generation biometrics”.
82 Ibid.
Page 17
recording and disclosure of the content of speech. Such re-oriented voice or speech
recognition technologies can also be linked with automated systems to ensure that
communications by certain individuals, or communications about certain topics, can be
monitored or recorded. This could discourage individuals who use certain types of voice
recognition systems from communicating with particular people or about particular topics in
areas where voice recognition systems are in operation.
Soft biometrics and the use of biometrics at a distance both pose a threat to personal data and
image. Article 33 of the proposed new Data Protection Regulation says that the processing of
biometric data presents specific risks, meaning that it must be processed in respect of
principles such as consent and proportionality. Some types of soft biometrics, and especially
biometrics at a distance, can present a risk that an individual would not know that a system
was in operation and thus would not have consented to the collection of their biometric
information and may not be able to exercise their rights to access that data. Behavioural
biometrics also introduce concerns over the storage of raw data (a person’s image or video
from cameras monitoring public areas) in databases and how this personal data is used given
these new capabilities. Finally, the fact that soft biometrics often collect additional,
unnecessary information raises issues surrounding the principle of proportionality.
Physiological biometrics can impact privacy of thoughts and feelings through the collection
of intimate information that can be used to detect suspicious behaviour or predict intention or
susceptibility. Imaging scanners that combine physiological measurements intended to detect
heightened emotional states could provide clues to an individual’s state of mind and
potentially lead to discrimination.83 This introduces a concern that human feelings become
technically defined and represented and that automated decisions over and about individuals
may be made based upon this information. Examples of such applications include counter-
terrorism applications as well as personalised advertising applications where individuals’
experience of semi-public space is restricted or impacted by the emotional state “read” by
biometric sensors. Again, the danger is not necessarily that the individual is identified, but
that they are categorised and decisions are made about them based on the profile they present.
Second-generation biometrics such as embedded systems and soft biometrics may also
negatively impact privacy of location and space. Unlike current-generation overt biometric
systems used to authenticate or identify an individual with their co-operation, sensing and
identifying individuals at a distance can result in covert data capture without the data
subject’s consent. This means that a biometric system can create a link between an individual
and a location at a particular time without their co-operation, and without their being aware
that this occurred. Thus, there is a clear overlap with the privacy concerns associated with
privacy of the person. Individuals could also be tracked without being identified by using
biometrics to differentiate a particular person as they move through public space. Here,
biometrics can be used in tandem with other surveillance systems, such as CCTV, static
cameras or mobile phones with location detection capabilities, to pinpoint or track an
individual’s location.
Finally, soft biometrics may negatively impact privacy of association. Soft biometrics
introduces concerns that individual members of a group could be identified at a distance
through the linking of such biometrics to other data sets. Furthermore, behavioural analysis
83 “Where Decisionmaking Is Measured”, Harvard Magazine, 12 December 2008.
http://harvardmagazine.com/breaking-news/where-decisionmaking-is-measured
Page 18
could be used to identify leaders or vulnerable members of a group, enabling group
organisation and decision making structures to be revealed.
4.7 FILLING IN THE GAPS
Despite the utility of Clarke’s four categories of privacy, particularly in relation to the
identification of specific types of privacy which must be protected, our case studies reveal
that new and emerging technologies introduce new and additional types of privacy that
Clarke did not consider in his original piece. Our conceptualisation maintains two of Clarke’s
original categories: privacy of the person and privacy of personal communication.84 We have
also re-worked Clarke’s categories of privacy of personal behaviour and privacy of personal
data to privacy of behaviour and action and privacy of data and image respectively. The
change to privacy of behaviour and action is because we regard behaviour and action as both
characterised by intentionality, but "action" is slightly different from "behaviour". Action has
an element of planning that is not normally present in behaviour. We would not want to
overstate this, however. One can act (behave) in a certain way in response to a certain
stimulus (if someone slaps you in the face, you might slap back, and there probably is
precious little time to "plan" such a response), but on the other hand, if you are an assassin,
you probably have a fair amount of time to plan your next hit (action). The change to privacy
of data and image is intended to highlight the image as a form of personal data that
increasingly can be mined for biometric data and used to identify, monitor and/or track
individuals as they move about public or semi-public space.
Furthermore, three additional aspects of privacy were necessary to fully capture the privacy
impacts of the new and emerging technologies that we discussed here. Clarke’s original
framework did not include privacy of location and space, privacy of thoughts and feelings
and privacy of association (including group privacy). Although Clarke includes some
consideration of “space” within his category of privacy of behaviour, our understanding of
location and space includes the potential to connect an individual to a particular location at a
particular time, rather than simply monitoring that person as they move about in particular
spaces. Furthermore, privacy of location and space includes the possibility that the individual
moving about space can be connected to a digital persona, or that location information could
be aggregated to actively or retrospectively track an identifiable individual as they move
around in public or semi-public space (e.g., shopping malls) or private property (e.g., stores,
office buildings). In addition to RFID-enabled travel documents, and the other examples
discussed in this paper, automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) systems, CCTV cameras
fitted with facial recognition and global positioning system surveillance such as chips carried
in smart phones also perform similar functions with similar associated potential privacy
impacts.
The inclusion of privacy of thoughts and feelings addresses another gap in Clarke’s
categorisation. Emerging technologies such as brain computer interfaces, as well as neuro-
imaging, neural modulation and biometric sensor arrays (heart rate monitors, skin
temperature sensors, pupil dilation) all have the possibility to disrupt the interiority of the
body and mind to provide clues about thoughts, feelings and/or states of mind. This differs
from privacy of the person in that privacy of the person focuses on identifying, reflecting and
classifying the physical body, whereas privacy of thoughts and feelings targets the more
84 As mentioned early on in this article, Clarke labelled privacy of personal data and privacy of personal
communications as “information privacy”.
Page 19
ephemeral aspects of the person. Furthermore, privacy of thoughts and feelings protects what
is perhaps the least controversial, most consistent and unwavering dimension of privacy, the
individual thoughts and feelings which until now were almost entirely imperceptible to others
unless individuals chose to share them.
Finally, privacy of association connects privacy, as a heterogeneous but largely
individualised concept, to interpersonal relationships. As recognised by Article 8 of the
Charter of Fundamental Rights, privacy includes respect for both individual and family life,
thus inter-personal relationships form part of the European conception of privacy. Second,
privacy of association links directly with other fundamental rights such as rights to assembly,
religious freedom and free speech. New and emerging technologies enable individuals and
their inter-relationships to be revealed through DNA sequencing technology that identifies
family relationships or enables individuals to be organised into groups based on physical
traits, technologies such as UAS surveillance or second-generation biometrics which can link
identifiable individuals to particular places at particular times and behavioural analytic
technologies which can analyse behaviour to better understand relationships between group
members and/or group structures. These additional aspects of privacy are most visible in
relation to new and emerging technologies and have expanded our understanding of different
types of privacy. The next section will examine how the heterogeneity and flexibility of
privacy, as a concept, needs to be maintained in order to continue to address the potential
impacts associated with technological developments.
5 THE MERIT OF ELUSIVENESS
As mentioned above, Gutwirth refers to a definition of privacy as “elusive”. In this summary
section, we argue that privacy is an inherently heterogeneous, fluid and multidimensional
concept, and we suggest that this multidimensionality may be necessary to provide a platform
from which the effects of new technologies can be evaluated. This potential necessity is
supported by the fact that different technologies impact upon different types of privacy, and
further technological changes may introduce or foreground previously unconsidered privacy
dimensions.
Our case study discussion above demonstrates that different technologies potentially impact
upon different types of privacy and embody different risks to privacy. Table 1, below,
summarises the spread of privacy types that new and emerging technologies may impact
upon. Consolidating the case study information illustrates that privacy of data and image and
privacy of behaviour and action are threatened by most if not all new and emerging
surveillance technologies. In contrast, privacy of thought and feelings and privacy of
communication are potentially impacted by second-generation biometrics and human
enhancement technology only. Therefore, scholars, legal theorists, policy makers and other
actors must maintain an awareness that there are different types of privacy in order to ensure
adequate protection of individuals (and society) in relation to existing and emerging
technologies, applications and practices.85
85 We do not mean to suggest that the newer the technology, the broader the risks to these different dimensions
of privacy. Each new technology must be assessed to determine whether it has impacts on privacy and, if so,
which types of privacy. It does not follow that new technologies necessarily pose greater risks to privacy than
older technologies, but it is certainly true, as we have demonstrated, that some new technologies have exposed
types of privacy not heretofore considered and that as technologies become more complex, the more likely it is
that the risks will also be more complex.
Page 20
This also means that the protection of data that describes a person will remain important in
the future. However, with the advent of new technologies such as next-generation biometrics,
DNA sequencing and human enhancement technologies the data being collected moves from
simply describing a person to being an inherent part of the person. This calls for a much
stronger focus on an ethical assessment element to complement established (and enhanced)
data protection principles.
Technology
Type of
privacy
Whole body
imaging
scanners
RFID-
enabled
travel
documents
Unmanned
aircraft
systems
Second-
generation
DNA
sequencing
Human
enhanceme
nt
technologie
s
Second-
generation
biometrics
Privacy of the
person
X
X
X
X
Privacy of behaviour
and action
X
X
X
X
X
X
Privacy of
communication
X
X
Privacy of data and
image
X
X
X
X
X
X
Privacy of thought
and feelings
X
X
Privacy of location
and space
X
X
X
X
Privacy of
association
X
X
X
Table 1: Aspects of privacy potentially impacted by case study technologies
We also suggest that the fluidity of privacy as a concept may be an important aspect of its
utility, since technological developments may introduce new types of privacy. As
technologies develop and proliferate, various types of privacy which had not previously been
considered or identified as under threat may become compromised. While the privacy experts
quoted in section 2 lament the fact that privacy is difficult to define and conceptualise, we
propose that fluidity and flexibility are necessary to enable “privacy” to respond to
technological changes. More precise conceptualisations, taxonomies and boundaries
surrounding privacy, particularly in the legal field, may disrupt the use of privacy to protect
individuals and groups from intrusions that impact upon their freedoms, fundamental rights
and access to goods and services.86 Therefore, despite other theorists’ frustration with the
difficulty in defining privacy, perhaps maintaining its elusiveness carries particular benefits
for law-makers and citizens. In any event, we believe that our typology offers benefits, as we
stated earlier, for policy-makers, academics, privacy advocates and any organisation carrying
out a reasonably comprehensive privacy impact assessment.
86 We draw support in this conclusion from Gutwirth, Privacy and the information age, pp. 33-34, who
discusses the undesirability of defining privacy from a legal perspective.
Page 21
6 CONCLUSION
This paper has provided three main theoretical arguments. First, we have demonstrated that
privacy is a fluid and dynamic concept that has developed alongside technological and social
changes. In the 15 years between 1997 and 2012, the advent of new technologies and
applications has meant that previously unconsidered types of privacy now need to be
addressed in order to adequately protect individuals’ rights, freedoms and access to goods and
services. Second, we have identified seven different types of privacy that current decision-
makers need to consider in providing proactive protection to individuals in the face of new
and emerging technologies. These include privacy of the person, privacy of behaviour and
action, privacy of data and image, privacy of communication, privacy of thoughts and
feelings, privacy of location and space, and privacy of association (including group privacy).
Each of the different technologies discussed here impact upon different types of privacy and
all of these types need to be considered when formulating privacy protections.87 Third, we
have proposed that one of the strengths of privacy is its complexity, fluidity and
heterogeneity. Decision-makers, and most especially policy-makers, may find benefit in
maintaining a fluid and mutable understanding of privacy in order to ensure that privacy is
protected in the face of future technological developments.
87 Privacy should not be narrowly defined, nor should information privacy (of communication and personal data
protection) be regarded as all there is to privacy. Clarke speaks of a serious debasement of the term 'privacy'
[which] has occurred in the case of U.S. and Australian statutes that have equated it with the highly restrictive
idea of 'data protection'. That notion derives from the 'fair information practices' movement that has been used
by corporations and governments since the late 1960s to avoid meaningful regulation.” Roger Clarke, “What’s
‘privacy’?”, Xamax Consultancy, 2006. http://www.rogerclarke.com/DV/Privacy.html
Page 22
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By 2030, the population living in cities will increase by an additional 1.5 billion people, placing a great strain on resources, infrastructure, jobs and healthcare (UN 2018). It has become clear that to combat this change, a number of creative approaches need to be put in place to ensure the sustainable growth of cities - one such approach is the ‘smart city’ (UN 2018). Due to the relative infancy of smart cities, and the diversity of approaches and implementations of smart information systems (Big Data and AI), many of the ethical challenges are still being defined. One of the reasons behind this challenge is a result of the varying smart information systems (SIS) being used in different urban contexts. This case study aspires to unpack some of these ethical challenges by looking at four different applications of SIS being deployed in large European cities: an AI used to understand citizens’ complaints (Amsterdam), a parking permit chat-bot (Helsinki), a platform for data exchange (Copenhagen), and a project with an open-source algorithm (Hamburg).Upon first glance, these technologies seem very disparate, but they all factor into the equation of what goes into making a smart city, ‘smart’. Over the course of the interviews, what quickly became clear was the degree to which smart cities are in their infancy, meaning that the availability and accuracy of data remains an issue in a large majority of the cases. In terms of the accuracy of recommendations – due to the early stages of smart city implementation, many projects remain wary of expanding the use of SIS, due to potential unforeseen issues and are therefore proceeding cautiously. Data has been taken on as a potentially helpful tool for citizens and planners alike to regain control and access to information within their respective cities. Consent, transparency and data ownership featured as prominent ethical considerations in all cases, especially the focus on citizens regaining control over their own data. Further, it remained a point of contention to whom the data would belong – with an overall consensus that data should remain the property of the citizen or municipality and not necessarily that of private companies. Throughout the process, it became clear that collaboration is at the heart of a successful smart city. Many of the projects utilised a collaborative public-private model to facilitate both the business development side and the citizen-engagement sides of the smart city. With differing degrees of success in the individual projects, this remained an important feature that experts believe will continue to develop in tandem with smart city projects. A bottom-up approach is clearly the most effective way to ensure that a smart city works and is used by its citizens. Overall, this case study offers valuable insights into the development of smart cities in a European context: including the use and implementation of SIS in urban environments, what kinds of ethical issues are evaluated in the literature and how they contrast and diverge from those faced by professionals in practice. It is hoped that this case study will offer practitioners, policymakers, smart city organisations, and private ICT companies interesting observations about a more ethically responsible approach towards SIS implementation in smart city projects.
Thesis
La gangrène symétrique distale (GSD) est une complication rare mais grave du choc septique conduisant souvent à des amputations multiples. L’épidémiologie de la GSD et le devenir des patients restent méconnus. Les amputations présentent la particularité de pouvoir bénéficier d’une rééducation prothétique efficace. Les objectifs étaient de décrire l’épidémiologie et la qualité de vie liée à la santé (QDVLS) après GSD une fois la rééducation achevée. Une étude multicentrique prospective et rétrospective fut réalisée. Étaient inclus les patients admis pour GSD entre 2005 et 2015, amputés d’au moins deux membres et ayant nécessité une rééducation spécialisée. La QDVLS était évaluée téléphoniquement par le questionnaire EQ-5D-3L tandis que les données épidémiologiques de la GSQ étaient recueillies grâce aux comptes rendus de réanimation. Neuf centres sur treize contactés permirent de recruter 30 patients dont 25 comptes rendus de réanimation. La GSD survenait majoritairement chez des femmes d’une cinquantaine d’années avec peu de comorbidités. La durée moyenne de séjour en réanimation était d’un mois. Les germes incriminés étaient principalement des cocci à Gram positif (64%) ainsi qu’Eschericha Coli (20+). Tous les patients étaient amputés des deux membres inférieurs et 80% étaient quadri-amputés. Concernant la QDVLS l’EQ index apparaissait inférieur à la référence française. Cependant les patients autoévaluaient leur état de santé global comme égal à la référence voire supérieur avant la GSD. L’EQ index était principalement grevé par la persistance de douleurs intenses. Nos données épidémiologiques sont en accord avec les rares études existantes sauf concernant la part relative d’Eschericha Coli. La baisse de la QDVLS mesurée par l’EQ index est conforme aux données post-réanimations de la littérature. La forte baisse de l’état de santé auto-évalué est comparable à celles des polytraumatisés et semble expliquée par la gravité et la soudaineté de la GSD. Des biais de mémorisation et de sélection ne sont pas à exclure. Enfin les douleurs apparaissent comme le principal facteur de détérioration de la QDVLS.
Chapter
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