Article

Examining the Relationship Between Financial Issues and Divorce

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the National Survey of Families and Households and both wife- and husband-reported data (N = 4,574 couples), this study examined how financial well-being, financial disagreements, and perceptions of financial inequity were associated with the likelihood of divorce. When financial disagreements were in the model, financial well-being was not associated with divorce. Both wives' and husbands' financial disagreements were the strongest disagreement types to predict divorce. Mediators derived from systems theory (conflict tactics) and social exchange theory (marital satisfaction) fully mediated the association between financial disagreement and the hazard of divorce. Finally, financial disagreements fully mediated the association between perceptions of financial inequity and divorce. These findings suggest that financial disagreements are stronger predictors of divorce relative to other common marital disagreements. They further suggest that financial disagreements (e.g., "content") are associated with marital process.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Moreover, financial decisions embody power mechanisms and, consequently, inequality, (dis)satisfaction, and injustice within a couple [Pahl 1983]. Further, the significant effect of financial disagreements on divorce rates has been widely studied [Amato, Rogers 1997;Britt, Huston, Durband 2010;Cubbins, Vannoy 2004;Dew 2009;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. In Russia, the issue of family stability is quite acute because the dynamics of divorces continue to be alarming, 1 and attention has been drawn to the fact that more and more newly formed couples tend to break up [Zakharov 2015]. ...
... Using the results of 35 in-depth interviews with Russian couples, this paper offers a new typology of financial disagreements by showing that the existing classification, made almost 30 years ago [Kirchler 1990], is quite limited for Russian modernity. It also supports debate on the importance of studying intra-family communication about money, which is generally considered by sociologists and psychologists to be one of the most sensitive and understudied issues [Trachtman 1999;Dew, Britt, Huston 2012;Romo, Abetz 2016]. ...
... For example, Addo and Sassler's study [Addo, Sassler 2010] found that the financial management model had a significant impact on the frequency of conflicts and their intensity. Others say that money in the family is uniquely associated with such hidden characteristics as power and control, because the sense of injustice, that at least one of the spouses might have, is a predictor of financial disagreements [Dew, Britt, Huston 2012]. ...
... Arguments about money are associated with increased hostility toward one's partner for both husbands and wives, as well as increased conflict tactics such as intense arguments and common couple violence (Dew & Dakin, 2011). Dew et al. (2012) found disagreements over finances were a stronger predictor of divorce than other common areas of marital disagreement. This is particularly true during the early years of marriage as couples are having to negotiate financial roles and blend their financial lives with one another (Ford et al., 2020). ...
... Our hypothesis that MFTs will report little formal financial training was strongly supported. Previous literature supports the idea that financial problems are a leading contributor to marital distress and divorce (Dew, 2011;Dew et al., 2012), and yet over 60% of surveyed MFTs have received no financial training at all. Less than six percent of the MFTs reported that they received financial training while in graduate school. ...
... The majority of MFTs reported discussing finances with less than a quarter of their clients, and only 22% reported discussing finances with more than a quarter but less than half of their clients. Although finances are a major concern of couples and families (Archuleta et al., 2011;Dew, 2011;Dew et al., 2012), our results indicate it is not a frequent topic of therapy, which raises the question of why this is the case. Perhaps couples are taking their financial concerns elsewhere, or the money issues of clients are played out within other relationship dynamics and addressed indirectly rather than directly (Aniol & Snyder, 1997). ...
Article
Research is limited regarding the training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) receive in the area of financial problems couples and families experience. We surveyed 293 professional MFTs to gain information about their financial training, level of comfort addressing financial topics with clients, and level of confidence to successfully address financial concerns of clients. Results indicated the majority (61%) of therapists did not receive any financial training but reported feeling comfortable (46.1%) or very comfortable (22.2%) addressing financial issues, and somewhat confident (56.7%) or very confident (23.2%) they could successfully address client financial issues. Therapists who received some type of financial training were more confident and comfortable addressing client concerns than those who did not receive any training. Implications for the field of marriage and family therapy are discussed.
... Financial issues are a major source of conflict among couples and a strong predictor of relationship dissatisfaction (Archuleta et al., 2011;Berry & Williams, 1987;Dew et al., 2012;Papp et al., 2009). Compared to other issues, such as problems with intimacy or inlaws, couples rate financial conflicts as more stressful, pervasive, recurrent, and impactful Vinokur et al., 1996). ...
... Notably, however, even couples who are not facing economic pressures can experience financial disagreements and poor relationship outcomes. For example, one study found that even after controlling for low income, low assets, and high consumer debt, financial conflicts still predicted lower relationship satisfaction and relationship dissolution among married couples (Dew et al., 2012). Thus, regardless of financial status, individuals can still have financial disagreements with their partners. ...
... Financial issues are key predictors of relationship dissatisfaction (Archuleta et al., 2011). While past research focused on the role of economic strain in predicting financial conflicts and diminished relationship quality (Conger et al., 1999;Dew et al., 2012;Gudmunson et al., 2007;Karney et al., 2018;Williamson et al., 2013), the present research examined how basing self-worth on financial success relates to financial conflict with one's romantic partner and corresponding relationship outcomes. Overall, results supported the vulnerability hypothesis-that Financial CSW, above and beyond economic strain, is related to perceiving more financial conflicts with one's partner and experiencing lower relationship satisfaction and less partner support. ...
Article
Full-text available
Financial conflicts are among the top reasons for dissatisfaction and dissolution in romantic relationships. Beyond economic strain, however, few studies have examined the psychological antecedents of financial conflicts that contribute to relationship satisfaction. The present research examined whether basing one's self-esteem on financial success was associated with greater perceived financial conflicts with one's partner and worse relationship outcomes. A cross-sectional study (N ¼ 167), dyadic study (N ¼ 193 couples), and a 6-week diary study (N ¼ 74 couples) revealed that participants with financially contingent self-worth reported having more financial conflicts with their partner, which was associated with lower relationship satisfaction and perceived partner support. In a final experiment (N ¼ 337), participants who were led to expect many (vs. few) benefits of financial success based their current self-worth more on money, showed greater conflict responses to financial scenarios involving their partner, and reported lower relationship satisfaction and perceived partner support.
... disagreement and lower wealth accumulation potential (i.e. lower education and lower earnings) are more likely to divorce (Amato, 2010;Dew, 2009Dew, , 2016Dew, Britt, & Huston, 2012). More specifically, US research from Eads and Tach (2016) and Dew (2011) showed that the presence of large unsecured debts (e.g. ...
... Next to a limited empirical acknowledgement of theoretical notions of cumulative disadvantage, research designs of previous studies commonly disregarded selection biases as another potential driver of wealth differences between ever-divorced and continuously married respondents. This is problematic, as the likelihood to experience a divorce is not randomly distributed amongst the married but partially predicted by wealth-relevant characteristics (Amato, 2010;Dew, 2011;Dew et al., 2012;Eads & Tach, 2016). ...
... Thus, respondents that experienced a marital dissolution and respondents that were continuously married during the panel participation could be assigned a common time count -time since (hypothetical) divorce -to assess the differences in initial wealth levels at time point 0 and wealth growth rates thereafter. As the likelihood to experience a divorce is not randomly distributed amongst the married (Amato, 2010;Dew, 2011;Dew et al., 2012;Eads & Tach, 2016), the matching approach had the additional advantage that wealth-relevant pre-divorce differences between the sample of divorced respondents and the selected continuously married respondents were reduced. Secondly, the two sample groups were used within multivariate growth models to test the posed hypotheses. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Amid a rising importance of private wealth and historically high divorce rates, this thesis investigates the association between marital dissolution and personal wealth of men and women in Germany. To address shortcomings in previous research, I build on the life course framework and apply state-of-the-art statistical methods using longitudinal personal-level wealth data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Results highlight substantial immediate dissolution-related wealth penalties for men but particularly women with lasting economic repercussions for the majority of divorcees. This can have flow-on effects on divorcees’ and, by implication, their children’s social participation, welfare reliance, or social network.
... More specifically, with a rhetorical opening, Cecil delivered the following message to young Black men: As expressed in the these narratives, understanding the potential impact of financial disagreements in marriage can be important in helping young Black couples successfully navigate these challenges. When discussing the issues that most frequently lead to marital disagreements, African American husbands and wives both frequently list money among the most common sources of conflict (Dew et al., 2012). Further, although many of the couples interviewed were somewhat financially secure, having "sufficient funds to meet most everyday needs does not preclude money as a serious source of conflict" (Papp et al., 2009, p. 92). ...
... Findings reveal that the most salient sources of advice relate to effective communication, understanding roles, and adopting a shared understanding of financial management. Although research shows that communication issues, financial strain, and role confusion could contribute to marital stress for any racial group (Boss et al., 2016;Dew et al., 2012;Markman et al., 2010), the impact of these factors could have implications for many marriage and family professionals engaging Black couples (Vaterlaus et al., 2016). ...
... African American couples are disproportionately affected by financial strain (Mincy & Pouncy, 2003). Existing literature indicates that navigating the intricacies of financial management may be especially important for African American couples, who disproportionately experience financial strain (Dew et al., 2012;Marks et al., 2008;Vaterlaus et al., 2015), but fewer studies recognize the abilities of Black couples to overcome financial issues and achieve strong marriages (Marks et al., 2006). The qualitative findings of the present study, however, suggest that financial agreement may be more important to marital stability than financial comfort. ...
Article
Objective This study used in-depth interviews with Black and African American couples in happy, long-term marriages to capture advice that can serve to convey the hurdles and expectations of marriage in the African American community. Background The U.S. Census Bureau reports that only 29% of African Americans are married. However, the majority of African Americans still desire marriage themselves. Therefore, the advice and experiences of enduring African American couples could be beneficial to those younger couples hoping to one day marry. Method Interviews and a semistructured interview protocol were used to gather data on marital experiences and counsel from 35 happily married African American couples. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods consistent with Marks (2015) Numeric Content Analysis. Results Three emergent themes related to forming and strengthening African American marriages are discussed: (a) Communication Keeps Small Issues From Becoming Big Barriers; (b) Share Roles, Share Responsibilities; and (c) Manage Your Money to Manage Your Marriage. Conclusion Key aspects of strong African American marriages include the ability to maintain open lines of communication, to adjust spousal roles with emerging stressors, and to agree on the management of income and assets. Implications This study informs young African American couples, family life educators, and marriage therapists on the common experiences and perspectives in long-lasting African American marriages. Using this information, young African Americans and those engaging African Americans can work to build stronger families and communities.
... Within the family domain, researchers have found that crisis has the potential to generate positive outcomes for family members, such as improvements in cohesion, resilience, communication, and intimacy (Eby et al., 2016). However, there is also a possibility that crisis may elicit fundamental differences between partners and even lead to relationship dissolution (Amato & Rogers, 1997;Dew et al., 2012;Neppl et al., 2016). Paying attention to this possibility of "crisis coming into the family" is particularly important because of the greater power of negative experiences over positive ones (Baumeister, Bratslavsky, Finkenauer, & Vohs, 2001). ...
... The deterioration of the self-partner relationship further divided the relational unit between partners, exhausted individuals' regulatory resources, and undermined their work outcomes. Our results partly explain why relationship conflict and dissolution within family often increase in times of crisis (Dew et al., 2012;Gimbel & Booth, 1994) despite relational support from family members being Fig. 2 Interactive effect of perceived self-partner disagreements over COVID-19 prevention measures and marital status on reduction in identification with the partner needed at these times to help build resilience in the family and work domains (Caruana, 2010;Eby et al., 2016;Van Daalen et al., 2006;Walsh, 2016). It is important to consider whether family members can deal with the crisis unanimously. ...
Article
Full-text available
As a response to the COVID-19 pandemic, our societies went into a lockdown model and many organizations required or permitted their employees to work from home. As a result, employees need to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic while they work from home, providing an opportunity to examine how COVID-19 prevention experiences influence those who are working from home. Based on the interpersonal self-regulation perspective, we propose that employees who perceive having more disagreements with their partners over COVID-19 prevention measures are more likely to experience a reduction in their identification with the partner which is subsequently associated with their negative work outcomes through emotional exhaustion. Results from a two-wave survey study with a sample of 282 employees who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic supported our predictions: perceived self-partner disagreements over COVID-19 prevention measures related to a reduction in identification with the partner, which was subsequently associated with exhausted regulatory resources and undermined work outcomes. Furthermore, these negative effects were particularly salient for individuals who were not married. Theoretical and practical implications for family-to-work interference and working from home in times of crisis are discussed.
... Marital disagreements about money seem to be particularly potent. Dew, Britt, and Huston (2012) examined how financial disagreements were associated with marital dissolution and divorce. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households, the researchers found that financial disagreements were the strongest predictors of divorce relative to other types of marital problems, such as chores, time spent together, sex, and in-laws. ...
... Previous research has made the argument that couples who reported disagreeing about finances on a weekly basis had a higher likelihood of divorcing Dew et al., 2012). However, we already know that the way in which couples communicate during conflict is more strongly associated with marital dissolution than the mere frequency in engaging in conflict (Gottman, 1994 Another important phenomenon that needs to be considered is the financial socialization effect (Danes, 1994). ...
... When those with dissimilar spending tendencies form a marriage, there tends to be greater marital financial conflict (Rick et al., 2011). This financial conflict can be a barrier to healthy marital outcomes, due to financial conflict's cross-sectional association with diminished marital wellbeing (Rick et al., 2011) and longitudinal association with divorce (Dew et al., 2012). One couple process, forgiveness, may have the potential to buffer the negative relational impact that dissimilarity of financial values-and associated financial conflict-might have. ...
... Despite such associations potentially providing meaningful insight for therapists, we are aware of no studies that test forgiveness' potential interaction with financial variables that might impact marital outcomes. Yet, considering dissimilar financial values might lead to relationally problematic (Dew et al., 2012;Rick et al., 2011) financial conflict, dissimilarity of financial values may provide opportunities for forgiveness. In the current study, forgiveness refers to how frequently a partner forgives the other partner in general, not just with potential financial discrepancies. ...
... The negative influence of financial stress on marital relationships and wellbeing has been well documented. Across studies, various financial stressors, such as debt and ability to pay bills, as well as perceived financial stress have been found to predict lower levels of marital satisfaction and marital quality (Archuleta et al., 2011;Dew & Xiao, 2013;Gudmunson et al., 2007;Stewart et al., 2017), and higher rates of marital distress and divorce (Conger et al., 1990;Dew, 2011;Dew et al., 2012). This potential negative impact might be considered relational maladaptation. ...
... Specifically, our qualitative findings showed that financial stress increased relational stress for some, while others reported that their family relationships helped them better cope with the financial stress they were facing. While we cannot determine why relationships were an exacerbating influence for some and an alleviating influence for others, previous research suggests that communication may play an important role in this process and may decrease feelings of stress that come from ambiguity (Dew et al., 2012;Grobbelaar & Alsemgeest, 2016;LeBaron et al., 2018). Additionally, as financial practitioners help their clients improve both their Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. ...
Article
Full-text available
Guided by the family adjustment and adaptation response (FAAR) model and using a panel survey of 1510 adults in the US administered during the summer of 2020 and a mixed methods approach, we explored associations between changes in financial stress related to COVID-19 and relational wellbeing. Regression analyses showed that, compared to those who maintained their levels of financial stress, those who reported increased financial stress reported increased conflict and those who reported decreased financial stress reported decreased conflict. However, decreased financial stress was also associated with decreases in emotional closeness and relationship happiness, suggesting that changes in financial stress can lead to both maladaptation and bonadaptation in families. Qualitative findings provide insights into factors that may exacerbate or help alleviate financial stress related to COVID-19.
... I'm asking you!" And he just stayed there looking at me… [Anastasia 33,Thessaloniki] Outside of the Greek context, studies (Dew et al., 2012;Moura et al., 2015) have examined the ways that economic situations may alter men's self-confidence and broader masculine self-identities. This finding, whilst drawn from women's perceptions of men's behaviour, indicates how traditional gender norms are also being reevaluated by some of the women in the sample. ...
... Various research topics have been studied in the financial well-being domain. Recent literature on financial well-being includes, for example, the research of Chavali et al. (2021) using the FMBS (Financial Management Behaviour Scale) to measure financial well-being (Dew et al., 2012). The results of this study showed that factors such as savings, future security, investments, credit indiscipline, and financial consciousness had a significant impact on the financial well-being of individuals in India. ...
Article
Full-text available
Financial well-being using a bibliometrics analytical approach to analyze the networks, clusters, and trends of scientific production is studied. This research uses a systematic literature review process, which is a step-by-step process-driven methodology, to find 327 articles published between 1978 and 2021 on the subject of financial well-being. This paper applies the bibliometrics method to investigate the research trends in the study of financial well-being, specifically analyzing the quality of the research by the citation status and the mutual influence of these articles. The results of the study provide an overview of citation trends on financial well-being such as the most cited papers and the network of these papers, the keyword distribution, the co-authorship status, bibliographic coupling analysis, and the most influential journals. This study tries to determine the trends and development of financial well-being research. This can help researchers attain a comprehensive understanding of this field and can be a reference for the application of financial well-being visualization approaches.
... Even the Prophet Muhammad emphasized in his hadith from Abdullah bin Mas ud, which was later narrated by Imam Tarmizi, that "Allah shall curse the muhallil and muhallal lahu." Yet, many Islamic scholars state that the use of a muhallil lahu for a cina buta or bakabuang marriage is halal [permissible or lawful] and that this type of marriage utilizing a muhallil lahu is a tahlil marriage or halalah [legalizing or making something halal] (Blenkhorn, 2002;Bone, 2020;Dew et al., 2012;Putra, 2017;Qureshi, 2020;Sabiq, 1994;Salam, 2020;Uddin, 2018). ...
... For example, Charles and Stephens (2004) find that job displacement increases the probability of divorce only for workers who are laid off, but not those who lose their jobs due to a plant closure or to becoming disabled. This suggests the divorce is not caused by the loss of income, but perhaps by some of the same factors that caused the workers to lose their job (e.g., mental health issues, addiction, impulsiveness, abrasive personalities, etc.) Likewise, Dew et al. (2012) find that conflict over household finances continues to predict divorce even after controlling for factors like income, assets, and the wife's share of household income, suggesting the statistical relationship is not entirely about financial resources. ...
Article
Full-text available
While the correlation between financial hardship and divorce is well-documented, the causality remains unclear: it is plausible that divorce causes hardship, that hardship encourages divorce, or that unobserved factors produce both outcomes. We specify a model that nests these possibilities and estimate it using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Structural estimates indicate divorce reduces the income/needs ratio in women’s households by 0.35 standard deviations, though this is partially offset by apparent anticipatory labor supply responses. We also find a negative structural error correlation between divorce and income/needs ratios, but no evidence that a change in hardship causes divorce.
... The main goal of this mixed methods study was to understand student loan-related family communication patterns before accrual and during repayment. Building on research pointing to the complexity of financial interactions within families (see Dew et al., 2012), results suggest that, for many student loan borrowers, student loan-related conversations with family members are about more than just money. Results from this study also suggest that family communication about student loans-both before accruing them and during repayment-can be seen as a reflection and extension of family financial socialization processes. ...
Article
Full-text available
With student loan borrowing becoming an increasingly common experience in U.S. households, it is crucial to understand the interpersonal manifestation of education debt within family systems. This study sought to understand how accruing and repaying student loan debt for one’s own higher education relates to family dynamics and communication within families. Leveraging Family Communication Patterns Theory, this study asked: How do student loan borrowers describe loan-related family communication patterns prior to loan accrual and during the repayment period? Utilizing qualitative and quantitative data collected through a concurrent nested mixed methods study design, findings from this study profile family communication typologies leading up to, and during, student loan repayment. Study findings suggest that the ways in which families communicate about student loans prior to loan accrual and during repayment (a) relate to family financial socialization processes and (b) play at least a partial role in how they experience student loans as part of their overall family dynamics. This study proposes a model of loan-related family communication dynamics and offers implications for future scholarship and practice.
... Indeed, people who are highly uncertain about their relationship are also more likely to avoid conflict-inducing topics that may threaten the relationship, such as politics or religion (Knobloch & Carpenter-Theune, 2004). The discussion of finances may also highlight dissimilarities or conflict between couples, whereby previous research has found financial disagreements to be associated with a greater likelihood of divorce (Dew et al., 2012). In sum, we examine relational uncertainty as our outcome of interest given: (a) the association between relational uncertainty and other negative relational outcomes, and (b) relational uncertainty may be a particularly salient outcome to examine relative to the presence of financial strain. ...
Article
Prior research suggests that financial strain negatively impacts relational outcomes and that fluctuations (i.e., volatility) in daily reports of relationship aspects may be detrimental for relational outcomes. Daily relational uncertainty may also be associated with financial stressors; however, little is known about the association between financial strain and levels of daily relational uncertainty, as well as the volatility in day-to-day relational uncertainty. The current study includes both members of 100 adult different-sex couples (relationship length M = 7.0 years, SD = 7.1) who completed 14 days of daily diaries. We examined whether greater baseline financial strain is associated with higher levels of daily relational uncertainty and greater day-to-day volatility in relational uncertainty among actors and partners. Individuals who reported greater financial strain also reported higher overall levels of daily relationship uncertainty, as well as greater volatility in daily relationship uncertainty. The association between actor financial strain and volatility in daily relationship uncertainty was moderated by gender and marital status, such that financial strain was only associated with greater volatility in daily relationship uncertainty for men (but not for women) and for unmarried (but not married) individuals. Evidence for partner effects were also found, where partners’ higher levels of financial strain was associated with less volatility in actors’ daily relational uncertainty; however, this relationship was moderated by income, gender, and marital status. Individuals with lower income levels (versus high income levels) reported less volatility in their daily relationship uncertainty when their partners reported higher financial strain. Males rather than women reported lower volatility in daily relational uncertainty when their partners reported greater financial strain. In addition, unmarried rather than married individuals reported greater volatility in daily relationship uncertainty when their partners reported higher financial strain. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
... Major stressorsincluding financial, health, job loss, or other chronic stressorshave been proven to affect marital satisfaction (Bodenmann & Randall, 2012). For example, financial stressors are associated with increased conflicts, marital satisfaction, and divorce rate (Dew et al., 2012). Other stressors, such as wars and conflict (i.e. ...
Article
Full-text available
After the COVID-19 virus was officially declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, the Israeli government adopted lockdown restrictions to limit its spread. The purpose of the present article is to examine the impact of this disturbing environment on Israeli women. Specifically, we examined whether fear of the virus would impact the women’s distress symptoms, self-rated health (SRH), and marital satisfaction. A total of 130 Israeli married women with children completed the survey during the lockdown restrictions period. All participants reported that their children were living with them during the lockdown, and that no one had been infected by the virus. The results indicated that fear of COVID-19 was negatively associated with SRH as well as marital satisfaction, and positively associated with psychological distress. In addition, psychological distress mediated the link between fear of COVID-19 and both SRH and marital satisfaction. To mitigate similar negative consequences in the future, it is suggested that interventions should focus on the way the crisis is presented in the public domain. In addition, further research is recommended to identify the various indirect consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological, physical, and relational aspects among women.
... Little work is done to examine mediating channels which may affect the relationship between FWB and overall well-being such as individual traits and social factors. For example, the association between financial and relationship satisfaction is mediated by financial disagreement (Dew et al. 2012). Yeo and Lee (2019) advocate that support from social contacts mediates the relationship between financial and life satisfaction among older adults. ...
Article
The field of personal finance has gained research momentum since the financial crisis of 2008, however, only few comprehensive reviews have been conducted to date. This study adopts a systematic review methodology to build a knowledge structure on financial well‐being. By combining bibliometric tools and content analysis, this study aims to capture insights not provided in earlier reviews, such as key authors, important journals, active countries and organisations, highly cited articles, and the prestige of reviewed papers. After reviewing 114 financial well‐being‐related papers, the study strives to highlight the factors associated with financial well‐being, as well as the relationships and critical theories underpinning research in this field. Based on the reviewed literature, research gaps are uncovered, and future research directions are provided to expand the knowledge in the area of financial well‐being.
... Considerable reductions in income are attested even for re-employed job losers, because the new job is frequently part time or of lower quality than the original (Brand, 2015). Increased conflict and dissatisfaction may arise as partners with divergent preferences for household spending contest the allocation of a diminished income (Conger et al., 1990;Dew, Britt, and Huston, 2012). Further, the economic strain which often attends income loss mediates a path from job loss to psychological distress (Pearlin et al., 1981). ...
Article
A now-substantial literature claims that job loss and union dissolution (the end of a marriage or cohabiting relationship) each increase individuals’ risk of the other, highlighting that major negative life events in the labour market and family can spill over across domains. We address three limitations of this research using UK data. First, these associations might arise from unmeasured factors which jointly predispose individuals to the two events. Second, the distinction between job loss (an event) and unemployment (the state it may lead to) has been neglected. Third, where the impact of unemployment has been considered, its duration has not. We simultaneously model both processes: does job loss (or being unemployed) lead to union dissolution, and does union dissolution (or being divorced/separated) lead to job loss? To investigate the role of unobserved, time-invariant confounders, we model the individual-specific effects as random variables allowed to correlate across the models for the two outcomes. Upon allowing such cross-process correlations, we find that job loss and union dissolution have modest and non-significant prospective associations with one another. We also find no support for a connection between being divorced/separated and subsequent job loss. Unemployment appears to increase risk of union dissolution; by attending to duration we uncover gender differences in this relationship.
... The Covid pandemic came with the invisible stressor of unemployment, cost-cutting leading to terminating services of their employees. 46 The Covid pandemic social restrictions norms led to, a circumstance that is likely to unfavorable impact on intimate relationships and sexuality of couples due to an increase in spousal interference. 47 A German study observes that families have been suffered badly from the Covid-19 pandemic and its associated lockdown. ...
Article
The Covid pandemic brought a hard time for sexual and reproductive health. Lockdown and covid restrictions made it difficult to maintain healthy sexual life and relationship. Although Covid is not a sexually transmitted disease and but can get a transfer into others by close contact with suspected or confirmed positive partners. Sexual health is essential for couples to maintain trust, intimacy, and love in their relationships. Reportedly sexual practices of couples changed accordingly to avoid any possible risk of transfer of deadly Covid infection. This paper is a review of studies published during past two years of pandemic. Even when people showing high levels of resilience, the negative aspects of pandemic and lockdown could affect their quality of sexual life. We are witnessing a century’s crisis where the whole world is under threat of rapidly spreading the new infection COVID -19 and the overall global impact of this new pandemic is yet uncertain.
... Furthermore, relationship quality factors, for example, loneliness, may be an imperative predictor of compulsive buying (Harnish et al., 2019). Studies that concentrated on relationship conflicts that focused on financial matters found that conflicts habitually hurt relationships, foreshadowed a deterioration of marital satisfaction, and projected surges of marital distress and at times subsequent divorce (Curran et al., 2018;Dew, 2007;Dew et al., 2012). Another study showed that investigating the effects of goals for financial success on satisfaction had the highest significance in two particular domains: family life and job, which were the strongest predictors of general life satisfaction (Nickerson et al., 2003). ...
... If we scrutinize the previous research articles it shows us the explicit impact of financial socialization on families and how parents educate their children's regarding different types of financial principles and practices and its influence on their practical life. Financial independency and capabilities are thoroughly linked with many aspects of an individual well-being for marriage and family connections etc. (Britt et al., 2012;Dew, 2007;Kerkmann et al., 2000). Parents play a vital role in an individual financial learning (Clarke et al., 2005;Grinstein W. et al., 2012;Jorgensen et al., 2010;Serido, et al., 2010) therefore dependency and capability of an individual regarding finance are deeply associated to them (Grinstein W. et al., 2011;Hira et al., 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study intends to explore the effect of Financial Attitude, Financial Literacy, and ParentalFinancial Socialization on the prudent financial management practices, amid the youth of Pakistan with moderating effect of Financial Well-Being. The population consist over the youth of Pakistan for which the data was collected through an online questionnaire. The study adopted the quantitative approach for which the data from 450 respondents was collected. Subsequently, the data was analyzed with the help of Smart PLS. The results indicated that Parental Financial Socialization, Financial Attitude, and Financial Literacy have a significant and positive relationship with Prudent Financial Management Practices. However, Financial Well-Being does not have significant moderating effect with Parental Financial Socialization, Financial Literacy, and FinancialAttitude. The results further highlighted serious concerns of the effectiveness of Financial Well-Being towards improving youth capabilities in managing their financial affairs in the marketprudently. It shows that challenges faced by the youth in the country market to strengthen thefinancial well-being of an individual by guiding them thoroughly, enhance the effectiveness, andencompass the right elements pertains to financial well-being to ensure today's young Pakistaniability to apply that in the real market place and have full financial freedom Keywords: Financial Attitude, Parental Financial Socialization, Financial Literacy, Prudent FinancialManagement Practices, Financial Well-Being
... Na przykładKelley, LeBaron i Hill (2018) wskazują, że stres w związku dotyczący finansów ma istotny wpływ na poziom odczuwanej satysfakcji z relacji. Czynniki ekonomiczne są także ważnym predyktorem konfliktów zarówno w przypadku par małżeńskich, jak i pozostających w konkubinacie(Hardie i Lucas, 2010), z kolei spory o pieniądze i postrzeganie nierówności na tym gruncie są znacząco powiązane z prawdopodobieństwem wystąpienia o rozwód(Dew, Britt & Huston, 2012). Istnieją również pewne doniesienia, że ludzie, którzy uważają, że mają stosunkowo więcej pieniędzy, mogą być bardziej zainteresowani atrakcyjnymi alternatywami, niż ci, którzy uważają, że mają mniej pieniędzy(Li, Li, Chan i Zhang, 2016).Nie bez wpływu pozostaje też status społeczny, który poza warunkowaniem doboru partnera (rozdział 3.1.), ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Presented paper captures the issue of close relationships from the perspective of behaviorism, that is the philosophy of science on which behavior analysis is based. Therefore, it is a theoretical interpretation of the functioning and evolution of intimate relationships rather than a direct extrapolation of results from scientific research. The issues discussed relate to basic learning laws that govern human behavior and what results from them for close romantic relationships. The author makes a critical reinterpretation of the main theories explaining the genesis and functioning of romantic relationships, indicating that the core of dynamically occurring changes in the relationship, partner selection, as well as feelings and emotions occurring in close relationships are simple learning mechanisms that occur over time cumulatively.
... Some studies suggest that forced proximity is a risk factor for domestic violence (Nigam, 2020). Even without forced proximity, stress, including financial disagreements between spouses, has been found to predict divorce (Dew et al., 2012). A recent study (Balzarini et al., 2020) completed with participants (N = 3,593) in long-term relationships (married, engaged, or dating) from 57 countries found that COVID-19 related stressors, such as social isolation, financial strain, and stress, were associated with greater conflict in relationships. ...
Article
Objective To assess love and relationship satisfaction among dating and married participants pre- and post-COVID-19 lockdown in India. Background Extant literature demonstrates the impact of stressors like terror attacks and natural disasters on intimate relations. Yet little is known about how a significant stressor like the COVID-19 lockdown will impact love among married and dating couples. Method Data from a convenience sample of 100 participants (65 dating, 35 married) was collected in two waves, first in January–March and then in May after the lockdown. Participants completed an online survey with measures of love, relationship satisfaction, self-esteem, and how they spent time with their partner. Paired sample t test, correlation analysis, and thematic analysis were used. Results For both dating and married participants, scores on relationship satisfaction, love, intimacy and passion were significantly lower post-lockdown compared with the pre-lockdown period. Commitment for those dating remained unaffected. Watching movies together and revisiting old memories was related to love for those dating, whereas for married couples, doing household chores, cooking, and watching movies together was associated with love. Conclusion Passion and intimacy in relationships changed after the COVID-19 lockdown. How couples spent time with each other during the lockdown holds important implications for relationship satisfaction. Implications Practitioners who work with couples must focus on ways in which couples spend quality time with each other. Norms that define a relationship, particularly with regard to participation in domestic work by men, must be revisited to adapt to the new normal.
... Provisional answers exist in literature showing that physical abuse [12], financial problems [13,14], infertility [15], infidelity [15,16], and personality conflicts [17] contribute to divorce. Although it is important to understand relationship-level variables that can cause relationships to erode, which is typical in the literature, it can obscure the fact that divorce typically does not occur because a relationship falls apart; instead, it typically occurs because one partner decides to leave [18,9]. ...
Article
Full-text available
In Western dual-educated, male-female marriages, women who divorce face greater burdens because of decreased income and primary or sole responsibility for caring for children than men who divorce. Why, then, do these women initiate divorce more and fare better psychologically after a divorce than men? Here, we articulate an evolutionary mismatch perspective, informed by key findings in relationship science. We argue that mismatches between women's evolved preferences and configurations of modern marriage often clash, producing dissatisfaction. Women's unprecedented career ascendance also affords women ever more freedom to leave. We discuss pressures from social expectations for men and women that contribute to or compound these vulnerabilities. We conclude with key questions for future research, which can contribute to strategies for mitigating relationship dissatisfaction and the profound loss and pain that results from divorce.
... A handful of studies appear to establish a link between economic hardship and marital separation (Becker et al., 1977;Charles & Stephens, 2004;Chiappori et al., 2018;González-Val & Marcén, 2017). By contrast, Dew et al. (2012), using a causal mediation analysis, argue that those effects largely owe to omitted variable bias. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the links between poverty and marital separation. In order to account for both unobserved heterogeneity and complex dynamics, the paper builds and estimates a dynamic nonlinear panel model with correlated random effects. The main finding is that a substantial portion of the link between poverty and separation appears to derive spuriously from unobserved factors that affect both outcomes. However, even after accounting for dynamics and unobserved heterogeneity, there remains a strong association between the arrival of poverty and marital separation. The results appear to suggest that poverty and separation often arrive concurrently, though that finding might stem from the relatively course periodicity of large micro household panel surveys. To that end, this paper presents a case for household surveys to adopt more frequent recordings of information.
... If men take home a larger share of the household income, their unemployment is more consequential for the household's economic security. As a result, unemployment of men may produce more financial stress, put greater strain on the relationship and therefore have a more strongly negative effect on union dissolution (Dew et al., 2012;Jalovaara, 2001;Sayer, 2006). ...
Article
Full-text available
Objective This article examines how unemployment affects the separation risk of heterosexual coresiding couples, depending on couples' household income and whether men or women become unemployed. Background Unemployment may decrease the separation risk as a drop in resources makes separation more costly—or it may increase the separation risk if unemployment creates stress and reduces the quality of couple relations. Moreover, unemployment may be more detrimental for couples if men rather than women, or low-earners rather than high-earners, become unemployed. Method This article adopts a couple perspective and assesses heterogeneous effects of unemployment on separation based on longitudinal data—large household panels from Germany and the UK using discrete-time event history models. Results For both countries, results show that the annual separation rate almost doubles after an unemployment spell: It increases from 0.9% to 1.6% per year. This effect does not vary when men or women lose their job. The separation risk after unemployment is somewhat higher for low-income couples than high-income couples in the UK, but overall differences are small. Conclusion Findings show that unemployment does not strengthen unions, but makes them more vulnerable—regardless of which partner becomes unemployed and regardless of a household's economic resources.
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates how partners’ money management strategies are associated with the experience of financial disagreements among older couples (60–80 years old). Money management is a broad concept, and this study operationalizes whether the partners pool all money, the partners pool some money, one partner manages the money (and gives a share to the other partner for personal spending), or the partners keep all money separate. The data comprise a subsample from the Swedish Generations and Gender Survey from 2012 to 2013. The descriptive statistics show that 11% of older couples experience financial disagreements and that there is a large variation in how couples manage their money. Contrary to our expectations, logistic regression analyses further indicate that couples who pool all money are less likely to have financial disagreements than couples who either keep all money separate or adopt a lower degree of pooling. Whether some or all money is kept separate does not seem to be important for the likelihood of financial disagreements, as all these couples are more likely to experience disagreements. Among couples with financial hardship, partial pooling and keeping money separate are associated with a higher likelihood of financial disagreements than pooling all money. In conclusion, the greater probability of financial disagreements among couples who do not pool their earnings calls for greater awareness of the potential consequences of various money management contexts among individuals, couples, decision-makers and practitioners. In the worst cases, couples may have poor financial wellbeing.
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented global morbidity and mortality which altered people's daily lives, as well as created multiple societal challenges. One significant problem posed by this unique stressor is maintaining healthy intimate relationships, which are linked to mental and physical health. The literature has shown that the pandemic has exacerbated issues for couples such as financial difficulties, a lack of privacy, medical issues, and family and professional concerns. The pandemic has also forced all healthcare systems, hospitals, and clinics to quickly incorporate telehealth services. The number of requests for mental health consultations has risen to the point where demand exceeds supply. This paper provides an overview of ways couples can stay emotionally connected during this time as well as provide future directions for therapists to help couples develop or improve adaptive relationship mechanisms.
Article
Objective The military lifestyle of extended training programs and deployments creates a need to clearly define each partner's roles and responsibilities after each departure and reunion. Background Previous researchers have discovered that the less ambiguity that occurs when an individual enters or departs the family system, the less likely the family is to experience strain or crisis. One challenging area of boundary definition is finances, as couples tend to avoid talking about money which may contribute to financial boundary ambiguity. Methods This study applies the contextual model of family stress to examine financial boundary ambiguity and its association with marital quality in the post‐deployment stage. This article presents a theory‐driven exploration of financial boundary ambiguity using the actor–partner interdependence model and structural equation modeling. Results Study findings indicate that role flexibility, as well as clear and open communication, are related to less financial boundary ambiguity. This, in turn, is related to higher marital quality, although there are differences in the actor and partner effects between financial boundary ambiguity and marital relations. Conclusion To more fully understand coping and resilience among military couples, the authors applied the contextual model of family stress focused on financial elements to clarify the significance of how the couples navigated their roles and interactions. Implications Programs focused on financial and relational health should focus on fostering communication around financial roles during periods of transition, such as the deployment cycle. In particular, programs should be oriented around strategies for reducing the stress that surrounds financial uncertainties and strain, in addition to teaching effective financial management.
Article
Using data from the 2018 FINRA Investor Education Foundation’s National Financial Capability Study (NFCS), this study examined how financial stress and financial behavior are associated with financial satisfaction among married individuals. As expected, financial stress had a significant and negative impact on financial satisfaction, suggesting that financial stress significantly decreased the level of financial satisfaction among married individuals. Despite its significant impact, financial stress was not the dominant factor in this study; but financial behavior had the most significant impact on financial satisfaction, followed by subjective financial knowledge and higher level of household income. Understanding significant predictors of financial satisfaction among married individuals can provide important insights for marriage and financial counselors, financial educators, as well as marriage and family therapists.
Article
There are many households with financial problems, but most research on financial management is restricted to individual effects, not taking into account the relationship these individuals are in. The current investigation tests whether a person’s attachment style predicts how comfortable they are talking about financial issues with their partner and how that relates to different financial outcome variables. Two cross-sectional survey studies in the Netherlands and the US, each with more than 100 participants show that a higher score on anxious attachment is related to less communication about money with one’s partner. Less financial communication is related to worse financial management within the couple, which in turn predicts conflicts about money. A third survey with 770 participants shows that less financial communication is related to more financial problems. These findings highlight the need to take relationship variables into account to understand financial processes in couples.
Article
This study focuses on the joint effect of gender and marital status on financial literacy. The study is based on the data of 7,456 adults who responded to the Financial Competencies Survey (2016), conducted by the Bank of Spain. The results revealed that married/couple women have a lower level of financial literacy than married/couple men, perhaps because men often make decisions regarding family finances, while women are often in charge of other homework. This may have important consequences for the financial autonomy of women of all ages, especially as they aging.
Article
Before President Johnson's Executive Order 11241 in August 1965, married men received lower draft priority for military service. As the Vietnam War escalated in the summer of 1965, anecdotal evidence suggests draft‐eligible men sought marriage to lower their likelihood of serving. This paper quantifies the effects of these Vietnam‐era policies on marriage and finds that they significantly reduced the age at first marriage and altered the choice of spouse. However, younger marriages induced by the war were less likely to result in divorce 15 years later. Evidence also suggests that these younger marriages had little effect on long‐term outcomes.
Article
Postdivorce cohabitation has become increasingly common, but research on the influence of cohabitation on the marital climate of remarriages is limited. Research on first-order marriages suggests that the length (or duration) of the relationship may account for some of the influence of cohabitation. However, there remains a need to understand the influence of cohabitation on the unique experiences of remarriages. Using data from 1,889 newly remarried individuals, we fit mixed-effect models to test the effect of cohabitation and relationship duration on the marital climate indicators of marital quality, marital instability, and remarital problems. Relationship duration, but not cohabitation, was negatively associated with marital quality. Cohabitation, but not relationship duration, was positively associated with marital instability and negatively associated with remarital problems. Results indicate that cohabitation may both benefit and harm remarital climates. This may explain, in part, the inconsistent findings in the literature and highlights the importance of studying remarriages as a unique population.
Article
Full-text available
Salma Haque Associate Professor, Department of English Language and Literature, International Islamic University Chittagong, Bangladesh Abstract A Doll’s House is the best known and one of the most popular of Henrik Ibsen’s works. It is about the liberation of an individual from restraints of customs and convention due to money issues. It also deals with marital problems and is about the unraveling of a middle-class couple. From Torvald Helmer and Nora‘s first conversation, we see Helmer as the master of the household who earns and controls the money. On the other hand, Nora is the member of the house who spends it. According to Nora’s friend Christina Linde, in her young days, Nora used to spend money greatly. Through this comment, Nora is portrayed as a shallow woman, who enjoys material delights. Yet, her generous tips to a porter and the gifts for domestic help during Christmas show her as a giving, unselfish woman. This paper will show how monetary issues can be a devastating outcome of a routine marriage, where the couple has different views on money and on life. It will also reveal how money can create self-awareness in Nora about her position in the house. Keywords: Nora, Helmer, Money, Marital Problems, Consequence.
Article
Full-text available
The study of financial well‐being has gained attention in recent years and a number of scholarly articles have pointed to gender‐related differences and their antecedents and consequents. The continuous growth of scholarly literature on women’s financial well‐being and its dispersion impose difficulties for researchers to comprehensively assess the state of knowledge on the topic. In this context, the objectives of this research are to conduct a systematic literature review of women’s financial well‐being and to propose directions for future research. This study comprises a review of 130 articles published in peer‐reviewed journals over the period 1990–2020. Bibliometric analysis was used to identify the year of publication and the countries surveyed, journal of publication, methodologies, concepts, measures and theoretical frameworks utilized; subsequent content analysis allowed us to summarize the main findings. We organized the identified antecedents of women’s financial well‐being into three categories: individual, household and community and societal level elements. The elements that constitute these categories are discussed and our findings point to important gender‐related differences. Based on the identified literature gaps, directions for future research are proposed. The theoretical contribution of this study lies in delivering a comprehensive overview of available evidence on women’s financial well‐being. Its practical and societal implications include the provision of knowledge that may allow better targeting of financial education programmes, economic empowerment interventions and public policies, which may help reduce the financial well‐being gender gap.
Article
Disagreements surrounding finances often impact relationships and may even lead to divorce. Financial conversations, then, emerge as the strongest “tug-of-war” opponent to the successful partnership couples hope to achieve, so researchers must identify strategies to positively talk about money. This study seeks to identify communication strategies married partners employ to successfully discuss money. This study takes an exploratory approach utilizing open-ended surveys. The narratives from 53 participants revealed that couples enact the maintenance strategies of understanding, sharing tasks, relationship talks, and self-disclosure to achieve positive financial conversations. Moreover, because one-third of the data focused on the importance of establishing rules and goals, couples should make it a priority to set clear rules and goals for their conversations revolving around money.
Article
In couple relationships, discussing finances is often considered taboo. Specifically, emerging adult couples experience several unique financial challenges that may contribute to poorer financial communication and pose relational risks. Utilizing structural equation modeling with a sample of 1,950 U.S. emerging adults, the current study tests associations between the time of a couple’s first financial discussion, financial communication, relationship quality, and financial conflict. Results indicate that initiating financial discussion earlier in a romantic relationship may benefit relationship quality—through financial communication. However, having an earlier first financial discussion as a couple was also positively associated with financial conflict. Financial therapists might consider teaching emerging adult couples to have a first financial discussion earlier along with strategies to overcome financial conflict. Additionally, financial therapists may consider assessing when emerging adult couples first discussed finances in their relationship. Overall, our findings suggest the sooner an emerging adult couple discusses finances, the better.
Article
Economic conflicts are likely to affect couples’ relationship, and different strategies of handling money may be important for how common such conflicts are. This study investigates whether couples’ choice of pooling money is associated with the occurrence of economic conflicts and whether different degree of pooling matters differently in different situations in life. The study focuses on whether the respondents experience economic hardship, their age (or cohort), and duration of union. We use the GGS 2012/2013 for Sweden including cohabiting and married respondents aged 20–80. Results from regression models suggest that couples who pool all money have lowest propensity for economic conflicts. Furthermore, to have difficulties making ends meet is associated with economic conflicts, older couples (or of earlier cohorts) are less likely to experience economic conflicts and likewise relationships of long duration less often experience economic conflict. It seems that pooling money is associated with less economic conflicts especially among the couples with economic hardships, among older couples, and couples of longer duration. Thus, pooling of money has a moderating importance for some situations.
Article
Full-text available
Using a sample of 2621 respondents from the 2014 Health and Retirement Study (HRS), this study identifies factors associated with who makes complex financial decisions among older couples. Our results show that the bargaining power of wives has a positive association with their decision-making about savings, investments, and health insurance, while the power of husbands is negatively associated with wives being more responsible for decisions about health insurance and tax filing. Moreover, while the husband’s sense of control, risk tolerance, and cognitive ability are associated with decisions for all financial decisions, the wife’s sense of control, risk tolerance, and cognitive ability are related to some financial decisions only. Our results show some moderating roles of the perceived spousal social support, household income, and mother’s education on the association between the four explanatory variables (bargaining power, sense of control, risk tolerance, and cognitive ability) and who makes the financial decisions. The findings provide potential benefits for older couples who consult financial professionals about financial management.
Article
Using the family stress model and marital bargaining theory, we aimed to investigate how financial stress and financial management roles are associated with both partners' (men's and women's) initial levels and rates of changes in financial disagreements over time. To test this, we used dyadic latent growth curve analyses obtained from 2158 German heterosexual couples over four waves or a 6‐year time span from the Panel Analysis of Intimate Relationships and Family Dynamics dataset. Financial stress and discrepant or unclear financial management roles were associated with higher initial financial disagreements in both partners. Only discrepant financial management roles were associated with lesser declines in women's financial disagreement trajectories. Additionally, in the context of greater financial stress, discrepant financial roles were associated with ever higher initial financial disagreements in women. Practitioners working with couples in financial distress should consider exploring the couple's level of financial stress as well as specialized and discrepant views on financial role division.
Article
Indonesia has experienced incidents of domestic violence involving partners working in professional fields. The domestic violence has become a critical problem in both developed and developing countries. The number of cases of violence against women (VAW) has been increasing every year. Data from Indonesian National Commission on Violence Against Women year 2020 show that there are 431,471 cases. Earlier studies indicated that high academic and professional status achieved by women can reduce VAW. However, cases of domestic violence reveal that such initiatives are not enough and do not exclude academically and professionally empowered women from being victims of domestic violence. The studies indicate that power relations between husband and wife play a crucial role in determining the incidence of domestic violence in a family. This study aims to reveal power relations in dual-career families experiencing domestic violence in Indonesia. The study deploys the qualitative research method and applies the Connell theory on gender and power. This research was conducted in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, and it involved 44 key informants and 34 supporting informants from the general public. The results reveal three categories of power relations between husbands and wives, who faced domestic violence in dual-career families: male-dominated families, female-dominated families and alternating families (i.e., families where the dominant roles of men as husbands and women as wives can change). This study concludes that the ownership of intellectual and economic resources in themselves does not contain the power relations between husband and wife play a critical role in determining the incidence of domestic violence. cases of domestic violence. Based on power relations between husband and wife, alternating family, driven by women’s resistance, is capable of changing the structure of the family. In alternating families, the power of husband and wife are alternated. There are reversed roles between them. Furthermore, it tends to build a new structure where there is no hierarchical family position between women and men. In addition, the structural change will create an equal and ideal family.
Article
How people choose to spend money is often observable to others (e.g., based on their clothes, accessories, and social media pages), but there is a whole universe of financial decisions that are essentially unobservable (e.g., how people handle their debts, taxes, and retirement planning). We explore one context where people have an up-close-and-personal view of someone else’s financial decision-making process: romantic relationships. We discuss how the endless opportunities for financial observation in romantic relationships influence a range of behaviors, including spending habits, decisions about bank account structure, and financial infidelity. Our review highlights the need for more research on the ways in which financial decisions are made, communicated, and observed within romantic relationships.
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we attempt to distinguish between the properties of moderator and mediator variables at a number of levels. First, we seek to make theorists and researchers aware of the importance of not using the terms moderator and mediator interchangeably by carefully elaborating, both conceptually and strategically, the many ways in which moderators and mediators differ. We then go beyond this largely pedagogical function and delineate the conceptual and strategic implications of making use of such distinctions with regard to a wide range of phenomena, including control and stress, attitudes, and personality traits. We also provide a specific compendium of analytic procedures appropriate for making the most effective use of the moderator and mediator distinction, both separately and in terms of a broader causal system that includes both moderators and mediators. (46 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
Full-text available
p> Recent studies have suggested that relative to other types of marital disagreement, financial disagreements are more problematic for couples. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 3,861 couples), we tested whether different types of marital disagreements predicted self-reported marital conflict tactics. Considering the findings overall, financial disagreements were among the consistent top predictors of conflict tactics, including using heated arguments more frequently than calm discussion. Contrary to previous studies, however, disagreements over housework also predicted conflict tactics about as strongly as financial disagreements. Husbands’ reports of financial disagreements were more closely associated with conflict tactics than wives’ reports. </p
Article
Full-text available
Social exchange theory (SET) is one the most influential conceptual paradigms in organizational behavior. Despite its usefulness, theoretical ambiguities within SET remain. As a consequence, tests of the model, as well as its applications, tend to rely on an incompletely specified set of ideas. The authors address conceptual difficulties and highlight areas in need of additional research. In so doing, they pay special attention to four issues: (a) the roots of the conceptual ambiguities, (b) norms and rules of exchange, (c) nature of the resources being exchanged, and (d) social exchange relationships.
Article
Full-text available
Financial spending behaviors and relationship satisfaction are generally thought to be linked for many couples. The current study examined how perceived personal, partner, and joint spending behaviors influence relationship satisfaction. The sample consisted of residents from several communities within one mid)western state (N = 347). Spending behavior items were used to examine the interrelationship between perceived financial spending behaviors and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated that partner spending behaviors, but not one's own or joint spending behaviors, influence relationship satisfaction. Other factors associated with relationship satisfaction included self-esteem and financial stressors. Findings suggest a need for marriage and family therapists and financial counselors and planners to consider financial behaviors, namely spending activities, as an important element when providing counseling services. © 2008 Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education ®. All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.
Article
Full-text available
Using the two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), we examine the effects on marital dissolution of couple's gender attitudes, perceived unfairness, marital disagreements, and relationship alternatives, exploring whether these dimensions of marriage influence marital dissolution, net of serious forms of hardship commonly noted in divorce research. With event history methods, we find that husbands’, but not wives’, perceived disagreements and alternatives are associated with higher odds of marital dissolution, though couples' marital happiness strongly mediates the effects of husbands' dissatisfaction. Wives' traditional attitudes are associated with lower odds and husbands' with higher odds of marital dissolution. We find no significant effects of unfairness perceptions on divorce. A nonviolent relationship is associated with lower odds of marital dissolution, but accumulated assets and debt and husbands' drug or alcohol abuse are not associated significantly with marital dissolution. Our analysis contributes to divorce research by demonstrating the importance of gender attitudes and low physical conflict and by showing that instances of perceived dissatisfaction might not matter for couples as much as marital happiness as an influence on divorce.
Article
Full-text available
A commonly held view is that arguments about money are associated with marital problems, but relatively little is known about the nature of arguing about money within marriage. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), this study uses a collective bargaining approach to examine the role of money arguments in marriage. The sample (N = 1,371) consists of married women. A collective bargaining framework provides a context for understanding money arguments within the marital relationship. Results indicate that costly communication is the dominant predictor of money arguments, followed by level and proportion of wife’s income, and household net worth. Because results suggest that both communication and financial resources are important components to understanding money arguments within marriage, a combination of professionals trained in marital therapy and/or financial planning is required for couples interested in seeking assistance to increase their satisfaction and/or avoid divorce.
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we attempt to distinguish between the properties of moderator and mediator variables at a number of levels. First, we seek to make theorists and researchers aware of the importance of not using the terms moderator and mediator interchangeably by carefully elaborating, both conceptually and strategically, the many ways in which moderators and mediators differ. We then go beyond this largely pedagogical function and delineate the conceptual and strategic implications of making use of such distinctions with regard to a wide range of phenomena, including control and stress, attitudes, and personality traits. We also provide a specific compendium of analytic procedures appropriate for making the most effective use of the moderator and mediator distinction, both separately and in terms of a broader causal system that includes both moderators and mediators.
Article
Full-text available
Money has been said to change people's motivation (mainly for the better) and their behavior toward others (mainly for the worse). The results of nine experiments suggest that money brings about a self-sufficient orientation in which people prefer to be free of dependency and dependents. Reminders of money, relative to nonmoney reminders, led to reduced requests for help and reduced helpfulness toward others. Relative to participants primed with neutral concepts, participants primed with money preferred to play alone, work alone, and put more physical distance between themselves and a new acquaintance.
Article
This study investigated the extent to which reports of marital problems in 1980 predicted divorce between 1980 and 1992, the extent to which these problems mediated the impact of demographic and life course variables on divorce, and gender differences in reports of particular marital problems and in the extent to which these reports predicted divorce. Wives reported more marital problems than husbands did, although this was due to husbands' tendency to report relatively few problems caused by their spouses. A variety of marital problems predicted divorce up to 12 years in the future. A parsimonious set of marital problems involving infidelity, spending money foolishly, drinking or drug use or both, jealousy, moodiness, and irritating habits mediated moderate proportions of the associations between demographic and life course variables and divorce.
Article
Many are familiar with the financial ruin the recent recession effected: U.S. unemployment above 10%, foreclosure rates at all time highs, and multitrillion dollar investment and home equity losses. Behind the easily calculated financial costs of the recession, though, are costs that are less easily defined - the individual and family costs. For example, home foreclosures likely exacerbated stress for many families. Unemployment probably took its toll on cohabiting and married couples' relationship quality. Finally, as older individuals watched retirement savings dwindle, many may have postponed retirement - some perhaps indefinitely. These ideas are speculative, though, because despite financial issues' potential to influence family life and relationships, family scholars have studied them less than other topics. Zelizer (1994, p. 43) noted, "In terms of evidence, to study money in the family is to enter largely uncharted territory. . . . We know less about money matters than about family violence or even marital sex." A decade later, DaIy (2003, p. 778) asserted, "we have given less attention to understanding how spending behaviors and consumer goods are the basis for the construction of meaning in the everyday experience of family life." Recent scholarship has made similar assertions (Stanley & Einhorn, 2007). These assertions are borne out when examined empirically. A review of 3,400 studies in Family Relations and the Journal of Marriage and Family from 1 980 to 2005 found only 91 articles with a main focus on finances and families; only 9 of those dealt with family relationships (Israelsen & Hatch, 2005). Thus, only 2.6% of these studies examined financial issues within the family context and only 0.2% examined how financial issues were associated with family relationships. Consequently, two research goals regarding the finance-family research gap guided this special issue. The first goal was to publish top quality papers examining how families dealt with financial difficulties. The studies we received in response were novel and timely. Two examples are a study that examined whether the recession pulled more wives into the labor force (Mattingly & Smith, 2010) and another that examined the predictors of using savings or consumer debt during a shortfall in income (Baek & DeVaney, 2010). The studies in this category provide insight into how families have dealt with (and are still dealing with) the effects of the recession. The second research goal was to more broadly stimulate scholarship regarding the association between financial issues and family relations. These broader studies showed that financial issues were associated with adult relationship quality and parent-child relationships. For example, one study demonstrated that pooling financial resources was associated with higher marital quality for wives than for husbands (Addo & Sassler, 2010). Two others explored parental influence on the financial behavior of young adult offspring (Jorgensen & Savia, 2010; Serido, Shim, Mishar, & Tang, 2010). We hope that this special issue might become one of many watershed moments where the discipline of family studies recognizes how central financial issues are to families and to family functioning. Although it already accomplished its two main goals, this issue will be even more successful if it continues to spark research on the ways that financial issues and family relationships intertwine. …
Article
As part of the Center for Financial Security’s 2010 symposium, this study examined the association between consumer debt and divorce. Longitudinal data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 4,574 couples) indicated that consumer debt was positively associated with divorce. Financial conflict completely mediated this association for both husbands and wives and marital satisfaction also completely mediated the association for wives. These findings suggest that when families take financial steps to secure their financial stability they may also be taking steps to secure their relationship stability.
Article
Despite the paucity of empirical evidence indicating the impact of money arguments on spousal relationship outcomes, it is common belief that money plays a large role in the life of couples. This study used panel data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine how money-related arguments affect the marital relationship. Economic theory indicates that initial expectations about the marriage and variance in expectations are both important in predicting relationship satisfaction and divorce. Money arguments were modeled as a sign of the lack of investment in spousal-specific capital and were hypothesized to negatively impact relationship quality. Results suggest that money arguments are an important indicator of relationship satisfaction, but are not as influential in predicting divorce. Both the approach used to model money arguments and the empirical results can be used by marriage therapists and financial counselors to help couples understand and improve the benefits received through marriage.
Article
Virtually no studies exist that support the still popular belief that financial problems are the number one cause of divorce. Recent studies have found financial problems to be poor predictors of divorce. This study investigated the effect of selected demographic characteristics on the relationship between financial problems and divorce for individuals who were in their first marriages.Discriminant analysis techniques were used to analyze the data. Although all of the discriminant functions were statistically significant, the demographic and financial-problem variables generated no meaningful predictive power. That is, the variables used in this study were not useful in discriminating the divorced from the nondivorced.
Article
This article examines marital power dynamics in couples in which wives earn more than their husbands, work in higher status occupations, or both to determine if wives with resource advantages are able to exercise greater power in their relationships than wives in more conventional marriages. The results do not bear out this hypothesis. This article argues that the logic of resource and exchange theories breaks down when women bring more money and status to the marital relationship. This suggests that the balance of marital power is more closely related to gender than to income or status. This article examines what Komter (1989) calls the hidden power in marriage and highlights how these couples do gender in ways that reinforce the husband's power.
Article
Research in the Unites States concerning the relative access of women and men to financial resources has focused on the influence of women's increasing market work but has largely overlooked the also critical issue of what happens to money after it enters couple households. To fill this gap, this article employs a typology of household allocative systems developed in Great Britain to analyze money management and control in a sample of U.S. couples drawn from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. I find that the use of these systems varies substantially across socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, and relationship status groups, as well as by partners' relative household contributions. The patterns suggest that many women, already disadvantaged in earnings, either absolutely or relative to their partners, are in couples in which men's control over or withholding of income may reproduce or exacerbate their earnings disadvantage.
Article
Utilizing a sample of 76 white, middle-class couples from a rural midwestern county, this study examined two central propositions: (a) the negative impact of economic hardship on a spouse's marital quality (happiness/satisfaction) or marital instability (thoughts or actions related to divorce) is in part a function of its influence on the affective quality of marital interactions, and (b) this process is particularly applicable to the hostile, irritable response of men to financial difficulties. A series of analyses supported these propositions. Economic pressures had an indirect association with married couples' evaluation of the marriage by promoting hostility in marital interactions and curtailing the warm and supportive behaviors spouses express toward one another. The hypothesized process was most pronounced for husbands, whose behavior was more strongly associated with economic problems than wives' behavior. Findings from the study are consistent with previous research that identifies negative affect as a principal behavioral correlate of marital distress; however, the results also suggest that more research needs to be done on the role of warmth and supportiveness in promoting marital quality. Limitations of the research and future research directions are discussed.
Article
The purpose of this article is to use a distributive justice approach to understand women's sense of fairness about family work. Previous research on family work is reviewed and organized around three factors that contribute to sense of fairness: Outcome values, comparison referents, and justifications. Women sense an injustice if they lack some outcome they desire, have a high standard for comparison, and believe there is no acceptable justification for being deprived of desired outcomes. To understand women's sense of fairness, researchers need to consider (a) valued outcomes other than time and tasks, (b) between-and within-gender comparison referents, and (c) gender-specific justifications for men's small contribution to family work.
Article
In this edition, the authors have tried to describe the full scope of family therapy—its rich history, the classic schools, the latest developments. There are lots of changes in this edition: more up-to-date descriptions of the latest models, an expanded treatment of the cognitive-behavioral approach, a richer description of the research literature, and a more thorough and consistent emphasis on clinical techniques. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Chapter
The Domestic Production of MoniesAllowance versus a Joint Account: The Allowance as “Bad” MoneyA Husband's Allowance: Domestic Money in the Working ClassPin Money versus Real Money: Defining Women's EarningsKeeping Money Domestic
Article
I argue that there is significant disjunction between the way that families live their lives and the way that we theorize about families. Using the metaphor of positive and negative spaces from the art world, I argue that there are many negative spaces in our theorizing—everyday family activities that take up considerable time, energy, and attention but that are poorly represented in our theorizing about families. Specifically, there are three negative spaces that call out for more attention, including the realm of spirituality, emotions, and myths; activities related to consumption; and time and space.
Article
Guided by a family stress perspective, we examined the hypothesis that discussing money would be associated with the handling of marital conflict in the home. Analyses were based on dyadic hierarchical linear modeling of 100 husbands' and 100 wives' diary reports of 748 conflict instances. Contrary to findings from previous laboratory-based surveys, spouses did not rate money as the most frequent source of marital conflict in the home. However, compared to non-money issues, marital conflicts about money were more pervasive, problematic, and recurrent, and remained unresolved, despite including more attempts at problem solving. Implications for professionals who assist couples in managing their relationships and family finances are discussed.
Article
Introduction General Conditions for the Randomization-Validity of Infinite-m Repeated-Imputation Inferences Examples of Proper and Improper Imputation Methods in a Simple Case with Ignorable Nonresponse Further Discussion of Proper Imputation Methods The Asymptotic Distribution of (Q̄m, Ūm, Bm) for Proper Imputation Methods Evaluations of Finite-m Inferences with Scalar Estimands Evaluation of Significance Levels from the Moment-Based Statistics Dm and Δm with Multicomponent Estimands Evaluation of Significance Levels Based on Repeated Significance Levels
Article
Scholars identified a negative relationship between assets and divorce decades ago, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 4,721 couples), this study compared three mechanisms that might link assets and divorce. Non-proportional Cox hazard models indicated that two of the three mechanisms explained the relationship between assets and divorce. Wives’ marital satisfaction and their perceptions of their hypothetical post-divorce standard of living completely mediated the relationship between assets and divorce. The relationship between assets and divorce was not related to husbands’ characteristics.
Article
The key relationship dynamics of communication, conflict, and commitment were investigated using data from a randomly sampled, nationwide phone survey of adults in married, engaged, and cohabiting relationships. Findings on communication and conflict generally replicated those of studies using more indepth or objective measurement strategies. Negative interaction between partners was negatively associated with numerous measures of relationship quality and positively correlated with divorce potential (thinking or talking about divorce). Withdrawal during conflict by either or both partners, though quite common, was associated with more negativity and less positive connection in relationships. The most frequently reported issue that couples argue about in first marriages was money, and in re-marriages it was conflict about children. Overall, how couples argue was more related to divorce potential than was what they argue about, although couples who argue most about money tended to have higher levels of negative communication and conflict than other couples. Further, while the male divorce potential was more strongly linked to levels of negative interaction, the female was more strongly linked to lower positive connection in the relationship. Consistent with the commitment literature, higher reported commitment was associated with less alternative monitoring, less feeling trapped in the relationship, and greater relationship satisfaction.
Article
This article addresses the therapeutic importance of discussing money at every stage of a couple's relationship, both as a concrete reality and as a metaphor for security, adequacy, competence, commitment, acceptance, and acknowledgment in a relationship. I will present a developmental schema looking at financial issues that couples confront at various stages in the adult life cycle and how these affect and reflect relationship problems. The article also presents a money questionnaire as a useful tool for exploring family-of-origin financial history, affect, and behavior.
Article
Using a sample consisting of 4,997 married couples from the National Survey of Families and Households, individual emotional distress, the occurrence of couple disagreements, couple fighting, and couple quality time together mediated the relationship between financial strain and personal assessments of marital instability. The overall results suggest that financial strain influences both positive and negative forms of couple interaction which are stronger mediators than personal emotional distress of the relationship between financial strain and marital instability. The results further suggest that there were no gender differences among these linkages. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007
Article
We examine the physical and mental health effects of providing care to an elderly mother on the adult child caregiver. We address the endogeneity of the selection in and out of caregiving using an instrumental variable approach, and carefully control for baseline health and work status of the adult child using fixed effects and Arellano-Bond estimation techniques. Continued caregiving over time increases depressive symptoms for married women and married men. In addition, the increase in depressive symptoms is persistent for married men. Depressive symptoms for single men and women are not affected by continued caregiving. There is a small protective effect on the likelihood (10%) of having any heart conditions among married women who continue caregiving. Robustness checks confirm that the increase in depressive symptoms and decrease in likelihood of heart conditions can be directly attributable to caregiving behavior, and not due to a direct effect of the death of the mother. The initial onset of caregiving, by contrast, has no immediate effects on physical or mental health for any subgroup of caregivers.
Techniques of event history modeling: New approaches to causal analysis The influence of perceived spending behaviors on relationship satisfaction
  • H P Blossfeld
  • G Rohwer
Blossfeld, H. P., & Rohwer, G. (2002). Techniques of event history modeling: New approaches to causal analysis (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Britt, S. L., Grable, J. E., Nelson-Goff, B. S., & White, M. (2008). The influence of perceived spending behaviors on relationship satisfaction. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, 19, 31 – 43.
Introduction to finances, families, and hard times.
  • Dew
Dew, J. P. (2010). Introduction to finances, families, and hard times. Family Relations, 59, 341 – 342.
Retaining clients through improved mar-ital satisfaction. Academy of Financial Services Proceedings You paid how much for Family Relations that? How to win at money without losing at love
  • S J Huston
  • S L Britt
  • D L Durband
  • J Grable
  • Co Denver
  • N H Jenkins
  • S M Stanley
  • W C Bailey
  • H J Markman
Huston, S. J., Britt, S. L., Durband, D. L., & Grable, J. (2010). Retaining clients through improved mar-ital satisfaction. Academy of Financial Services Proceedings. Denver, CO. Jenkins, N. H., Stanley, S. M., Bailey, W. C., & Markman, H. J. (2002). You paid how much for Family Relations that? How to win at money without losing at love. San Fransisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Is the economy ruining your marriage? Money Magazine Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com Family therapy: Concepts and methods
  • G Mannes
Mannes, G. (2009). Is the economy ruining your marriage? Money Magazine. Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/2009/08/10/news/economy/ economy_marriage.moneymag/index.htm?post version=2009082110 Nichols, M. P., & Schwartz, R. C. (2004). Family therapy: Concepts and methods (6th ed.). New York: Allyn and Bacon.
Fatal (fiscal) attraction: Spendthrifts and tightwads in marriage. SSRN Working Paper Retrieved from http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_ id=1339240 Multiple imputation for nonre-sponse in surveys Hard living, perceived entitlement to a great marriage, and marital dissolution
  • S I Rick
  • D A Small
  • E J Finkel
Rick, S. I., Small, D. A., & Finkel, E. J. (2009). Fatal (fiscal) attraction: Spendthrifts and tightwads in marriage. SSRN Working Paper. Retrieved from http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_ id=1339240 Rubin, D. B. (1987). Multiple imputation for nonre-sponse in surveys. New York: Wiley. Sanchez, L., & Gager, C. T. (2000). Hard living, perceived entitlement to a great marriage, and marital dissolution. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 62, 708 – 722.
The state of our unions: Marriage in America, 2009. Money and marriage
  • W B Wilcox
Wilcox, W. B. (2009). The state of our unions: Marriage in America, 2009. Money and marriage. Charlottesville, VA: National Marriage Project.
The power of the purse: Allocation systems and inequality in couple households.
  • Kenney
  • Rubin
Financial problems and divorce: Do demographic characteristics strengthen the relationship?
  • Andersen