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Looking Back and Forward - Holography at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM)

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Abstract

The holography laboratory at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM) has been active since 1990. During this time numerous students and staff have created holographic artwork and experimented with various printing techniques. Several projects are presented to show how holography can be used to explore a range of artistic concepts, leading to a discussion of the holographic image in relation to creative practice and art education.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
Looking Back and Forward – Holography at the
Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM)
To cite this article: Martina Mrongovius and Guillermo Heinze 2013 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 415 012067
View the article online for updates and enhancements.
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Looking Back and Forward – Holography at the Academy of
Media Arts, Cologne (KHM)
Martina Mrongovius and Guillermo Heinze
-1/MinusEins / Experimentallabor, Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM)
Peter-Welter-Platz 2, Cologne, 50676, Germany
mlm@khm.de
Abstract. The holography laboratory at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM) has been
active since 1990. During this time numerous students and staff have created holographic
artwork and experimented with various printing techniques. Several projects are presented to
show how holography can be used to explore a range of artistic concepts, leading to a
discussion of the holographic image in relation to creative practice and art education.
1. Introduction
Academy of Media Arts, Cologne [Kunsthochschule für Medien] known as the KHM was founded in
1990 with the aim of establishing an environment for the advancement and teaching of new media
arts. The founders understood that exploring artistic questions with new media required not only
technical proficiency but the cross-pollination of conceptual thinking in a number of disciplines.
One of the founding professors, Dieter Jung, established the holography laboratory – the ‘hololab’
with the assistances of KHM technician Urs Fries and assistant professor Andrew Pepper. Over 22
years the hololab has seen a wide range of projects created by KHM students, many guests and a
number of visiting fellows. The assistant professorship in holography is a limited term position that
had been held by Michael Bleyenberg (1997–2002), Peter Schuster (2002–2008) and currently
Martina Mrongovius (since 2009). In 2008 Mischa Kuball became the professor of holography,
creating the -1/MinusEins / Experimentallabor and encouraged students to develop artworks with
optical media and present these on the ‘urban stage’[1].
The holography laboratory in -1/MinusEins currently comprises:
- A multiplex printer ‘the Imager’ first installed 1991 and updated in 2003
- A dot matrix hologram printer with a resolution of 280 x 380 px installed in 2002
- A small table with HeNe laser
The multiplex and dot-matrix systems were designed by Walter Spierings of the Dutch Holographic
Laboratories.
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd
1
The hololab and ‘the Imager’ 1994 (Left), 2000 (Centre), 2011 (Right)
This paper describes a number of conceptual explorations made with holography at the KHM to reflect
on the broad scope of the medium and raise the question of where holographic imaging technology
could lead next.
2. The hologram as an architectural element
Michael Bleyenberg was both a student and assistant professor at the KHM and developed holographic
works that he came to consider as ‘Light Architecture’[2]. Bleyenberg currently collaborates with the
Cologne based company HoloPro to produce architectural installations with dot-matrix holograms.
Michael Bleyenberg
Left: EyeFire/AugenF euer, 2000. German Research Association (DFG) building in Bonn, 13 x 5 m
Centre: Close up of EyeFire/AugenFeuer, photographed 2008
Right: Modul, 1994
3. Animation in holographic images
The multiplex holographic printing system ‘the Imager has been used to print both stereographic
images that synthesize 3-dimensional space as well as a whole range of animated sequences.
Jean-François Moreau was a fellow from 1994–1996 and made multiplex ‘video-holograms’. He
also used the multiplex printing system to create 3-dimensional portraits using a camera track and
through data collected by scanning the subject. Moreau was interested in how time could be caputured
and viewed through holography, “the hologram introduces a new type of time... The movement in
space of the viewer corresponds to a displacement in time for the image.” [3]
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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Jean-François Moreau
Right: Night and day, 1994, vidéo-hologramme, 20 x 25 cm
Centre: Stereographic vidéo-hologramme portrait from camera track, 20 x 25 cm
Left: Folie, 1994, vidéo-hologramme, with Kirk Wollford, 20 x 25 cm
Martina Mrongovius who first came to the KHM as a guest in 2005, became interested in the way
multiplex holograms provoked the viewer to move and has creating a series of works that played on
the relationship between the movement of the viewer and the animation of the scene.
Martina Mrongovius, Up the Stairs, 2010
Installation as part of the exhibition ‘-1/MinusEins im Exil’, Sommerloch, Wuppertal
4. The hologram as a memory
The relationship of the hologram to memory was nostalgically captured by postgraduate student Stefan
Sillies in his installation Schau heimwärts! [Look homeward] (2005). The installation consisted of six
tables each with a number of small boxes, some of these boxes could be opened, some could not.
Some of these boxes illuminated a hologram when opened. Other boxes when opened were empty or
filled with small things. Each small box reflected a stage of life or a special event.
Stefan Sillies
Schau heimwärts! [Look homeward], 2005
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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A guest student from Chile, Claudia Sandoval considered the social implications of holographic
images and was drawn to the disappearance of the image when not illuminated or viewed from the
correct angle. Working with this quality Sandoval created a series of dot-matrix hologram portraits
‘Holograms of Deportation’:
“In ‘Holograms of Deportation’, mirrors stand blindly reflecting throughout the day on walls of
Berlin. Only during a couple of hours of the day and from a certain perspective these mirrors
reproduce the images of three people who have been deported from Germany, as if these dot
holograms were bringing back a sort of screaming ghosts. The street art intervention is transmitted
through the internet during the day. Opposite to all expectations, nothing happens to the
holograms. In a city like Berlin three standing mirrors are quite invisible. As if the city itself knew
they contain only ghosts, as if it was better to keep the deported as they are: Unseen.”[4]
Claudia Sandoval, ‘Holograms of Deportation’ 2010
5. The limited viewing of a hologram
The limited yet relational geometry of viewing white-light transmission holograms was the basis of
Stuart Rosenberg’s experimentation leading to Viewing Apparatus’(1991–1993), in which
relationships of viewer, light-source and hologram are materialised into a device. The first iteration of
the project View1 looked something like a medieval torture device: the viewer inserted their head
between two planks of scaffolding wood. The physically uncomfortable restriction was reflected in
the hologram designed for the installation.
Stuart Rosenberg, ‘Viewing Apparatus’
View1 and hologram for installation, 1991
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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Stuart Rosenberg, ‘Viewing Apparatus’
Left: View2, 1992. Right: View4, 1993
This positioning of the viewer was also the theme of Mioon’s installation Holopublikum (2005)
“In front of the audience there is a stadium. 200 holographs hang down within this stadium to
give a clap to the audience. Moving components (consisting of ten motors) are installed
behind the 200 holographs to move them. With this motors the people shown in the
holographs are generated to shout and cheer. If the audience stands in front of the stadium, it
can hear sounds of shouting and cheering peoples, too. Actually in our huge modern society
people are standing under the influence of mass media, politicians, capital and other external
influences. Historically we have seen the example of control or domination thru this so many
times. So with this works I want to show this situation and the lack of critical faculty of the
general public, and the lack of personality of them. Besides that, I also want to show to the
people that they are controlled right now by somewhat.” [5]
Mioon – Min-Sun Kim and Moon-Sun Choi, Holopublikum, 2005
6. Playing of the holographic image
Seth Riskin who was a fellow at the KHM in 1999 considered the playing of light through the
hologram by using his body as a light source for performance that was then viewed through a
holographic diffraction grating.
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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Seth Riskin, Light Dance, 1999
The playing of the holographic image was also explored by postgraduate student Auriel in his garden
installations of dot-matrix holograms. The holograms, which he changed like during the performance,
were illuminated by dappled sunlight and accompanied by a reel-to-reel recording of Auriel’s music.
Auriel, hologram performance in the garden, 2010
7. Fragmentation and structure
Miri Shin, who is currently completing her post-graduate diploma, uses holography among other
mediums to explore a chair as a hyper-cubist form. Shin’s work fragments and combines the
representation of this familiar object into a structural form, which she describes as a means “to find out
another latent reality of the object by tracing aspects of changing time and space in act of looking at
it”.
Miri Shin Rotating Chair’, 2011/12
Left: 20-panel etched-image plexiglass sculpture. Centre: Lenticular. Right: 200-frame multiplex transmission hologram.
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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8. Visual texture
Guillermo Federico Heinze an undergraduate student, explores and uses holograms to create objects
and installations with a visual texture that moves and changes colours according to the observer's
interactions. In ‘the hologram and the girl’, observers could interact with a dodecahedron composed
of twelve digital full color holographic stereograms. Wearing golden gloves and moving the shape
around under three lights the observer can interact with the work in a ludic way. Discovering each
hologram reveals that the girl inside the hologram is doing the same, wearing the same golden gloves
and interacting with platonic bodies like pyramids, cubes and spheres.
Guillermo Federico Heinze, The hologram and the girl, 2006
With ‘In and out-sides’ Heinze's invites the observer to explore a landscape of irregular surfaces,
toys and deep visual cavities of holograms on the surface of an asteroid-like sculpture. The holograms
show different abstract sculptures, connected to the whole through the materials they involve. The
pink surface of the sculpture is composed of Styrofoam balls, sugar and glue, designed to make the
observer hungry for sweets and is reminiscent of a huge cotton candy. The kinder-surprise toys,
joysticks and computer parts suggest a playful way to perceive and transform reality, something that is
very usual to children.
Guillermo Federico Heinze, Ins and outsides, 2007
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
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9. The collective holographic image
The seminar ‘Collecting the Image’ in 2009 encouraged students to compile holograms from multiple
related photographs, much in the way that images are ‘pooled’ online.
Left and Centre: Auriel, Holotour, 2009. Multiplex hologram from touristic photographs taken across Europe
Right: Guillermo Federico Heinze, mydailyfaces, 2012
A recent work by Guillermo Federico Heinze that follows this theme is ‘mydailyfaces’ – an
achromatic multiplex hologram that is composed of two hundred self-portraits, taken over a two
hundred day period. When viewing this hologram, it is impossible to see only one frame, instead, the
viewer sees a collaged face, composed by different days, different emotional states, combined to offer
a wider spectrum of the portrayed person.
10. Conclusion
These are just a few of the projects created at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (KHM). With
each project being developed through creative dialogue and experimentation. The process of
presenting concepts through installations with holographic images involves a negotiation between the
possibilities of holographic conceptualisation and the recording and printing techniques available.
Compared to other media in the last 22 years at the KHM, the scope for printing holograms has not
changed significantly. Yet culture and technology seem poised, ready to explore new holographic
installation possibilities. So the question is how to develop holographic imaging practice as a tool for
future artistic expression?
References
[1] http://minus1.khm.de/
[2] Michael Blyenberg – http://www.bleyenberg-light-art.com/
[3] Jean-François Moreau. 1997. La représentation de l'espace-temps et l'hologramme.
http://rac.chez.com/souvexp.html Translated from French: l'hologramme introduit un temps
d'un type nouveau... Au déplacement dans l'espace du spectateur correspond un déplacement
dans le temps pour l'image
[4] Claudia Sandoval http://www.claudiasandovalromero.com/
[5] Min-Sun Kim
http://www.khm.de/pm/projekte/projekt/paview/1968/paitems/60/pasearch/mioon/
Information about holography at KHM: http://kunst.khm.de/plattformen/holographie-und-lichtkunst/
9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/415/1/012067
8
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
La représentation de l'espace-temps et l'hologramme
  • Jean-François Moreau
Jean-François Moreau. 1997. La représentation de l'espace-temps et l'hologramme. http://rac.chez.com/souvexp.html Translated from French: l'hologramme introduit un temps d'un type nouveau... Au déplacement dans l'espace du spectateur correspond un déplacement dans le temps pour l'image
  • Claudia Sandoval Http
Claudia Sandoval http://www.claudiasandovalromero.com/ [5] Min-Sun Kim http://www.khm.de/pm/projekte/projekt/paview/1968/paitems/60/pasearch/mioon/ Information about holography at KHM: http://kunst.khm.de/plattformen/holographie-und-lichtkunst/ 9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012) IOP Publishing Journal of Physics: Conference Series 415 (2013) 012067