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International Migration and Labour Turnover: the Case of the Construction Sector in the EU and the CIS

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Scholarship on international migration has shown how structural features of the global capitalist economy contribute to labour mobility. This paper looks into labour migrants’ recruitment and employment systems to identify their forms of resistance. The study is based on qualitative research involving workers from Moldova and Ukraine working in the Russian and Italian construction sector. Fieldwork has been carried out in Russia, Italy and Moldova. Overcoming methodological nationalism, this study recognises transnational spaces as the new terrain, where antagonistic industrial relations are rearticulated. Labour turnover is posited as key explanatory factor and understood not simply as the outcome of capital recruitment strategies but also as workers’ agency.

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In Europe the interaction of biker clubs with Christian churches is not surprising, biker churches and services became a usual thing, Catholics and Lutherans, led by their pastors, regularly hold large-scale national motorcycle events. In Russia biker movement emerged as a copy of west motocycle associations, but it gradually acquired its own specific features imposed, in particular, by the interaction between bikers and the Russian Orthodox Church. Such intertwining of Orthodox Christianity and biker clubs generates specific practices such as religious processions on motorcycles, motocycle religious services, motopilgrimages etc. Bikers take active part in patriotic events. Forms of interaction between bikers and the Russian Orthodox Church are the subject of my study. В Европе взаимодействие байкерского движения с христианскими церквями давно не вызывает удивления, байкерские церкви и богослужения стали привычным делом, католики и лютеране во главе со своими пасторами регулярно организуют масштабные национальные мотоциклетные акции. В России байкерское движение возникло как калька с западного, но постепенно приобрело свои специфические особенности продиктованные, в частности, взаимодействием байкеров с Русской православной церковью. Подобное переплетение православия и байкерства порождает специфические практики, такие как крестные ходы на мотоциклах, мотомолебны, мотопаломничества и пр. Особенно заметно их присутствие на патриотических мероприятиях. Формы взаимодействия байкеров с Русской православной церковью и являются предметом моего социологического исследования.
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