Conference PaperPDF Available

Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings

Authors:
  • Vrana GmbH - NDE Consulting and Solutions

Abstract and Figures

Heavy rotor forgings, in particular for the power generation market, are highly stressed components and the ultrasonic inspection is the most important method to guarantee a sufficient material quality throughout the volume. This is why more and more heavy rotor forgings have to be inspected using automated inspection systems guarantying a high probability of detection for possible flaws, good documentation as well as highly repeatable inspection. In contrast to manual inspection, automated inspection does not allow for an optimization of a flaw reflection by moving the probe, as the probe is continuously moved over the part surface in distinct scan lines, resulting in a distinct pattern of inspection points. To ensure full volume coverage using overlapping ultrasonic beams from neighboring inspection points, a precise definition of an examination grid is required. To assure that all critical errors are detected, multiple scan directions have to be applied as per VGB-R 504 M [1] to inspect the complete volume, resulting in a high inspection duration. Moreover most of the rotor forgings have a low sound attenuation, resulting in low pulse repetition rates and even longer inspection times. An ideal inspection grid will therefore make sure the full forging volume is covered by the inspection and reduce the inspection duration to a necessary minimum at the same time. Several standards currently specify an examination grid for manual inspection, which are not simply transferrable to automated inspection. This paper presents a solution to this problem, developed by the subcommittee “Automated UT” of the national German society for NDE (DGZfP).
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
No caption available
… 
Content may be subject to copyright.
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid
for the Automated Ultrasonic Inspection of
Heavy Rotor Forgings
DGZfP Committee Ultrasonic Testing
Subcommittee Automated UT
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Automated Shaft Inspection System
Saarschmiede, Völklingen
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Terms
Dx
dx
dy
DyScan direction
Index direction
dx: Increment in scan
direction
(Defined by pulse repetition
rate and examination
speed)
dy: Distance between two
adjacent laps in index
direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the
ultrasonic beam
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Automatisierte Disc Inspection System
Schmiedewerke Gröditz
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Automated Shaft Inspection System
GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies, Alzenau
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Automated Shaft Inspection System
KARL DEUTSCH Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co KG, BGH Siegen
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Required for heavy rotor
forgings
Limited optimization
regarding flaw reflection
Recorded in distinct pattern
Full volume coverage
required
Automated UT Multiple Scans
Required by VGB-R 504 M
Low Sound Attenuation
Limited pulse repetition
rates
Limited inspection speed
Cost of ultrasonic inspection depends directly on examination grid
(both in scanning and index direction)
High inspection duration
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Requirements in Current Standards
EN 10228-3:1998 - Non-destructive testing of steel forgings
Dx
dx
dy
DyScan direction
Index direction
Requirement
Overlap of at least 10% of
the effective active element
size
No requirement in scan
direction
Issues for AutoUT
Apparently assumes a high
pulse-repetition-rate and
slow probe movement.
Shape and size of the
sound bundle not
considered
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Requirements in Current Standards
EN 583-1:1998 - Ultrasonic examination - General principles
Requirement
Based on size of -6 dB beam
Requirement in scan and index direction
The beam of two adjacent -6 dB beams
have to touch
Issues for AutoUT
Some zones are not inspected with the
required sensitivity
No formulas provided how to determine an
examination grid
Dx
dx
dy
Dy
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Requirements in Current Standards
ASTM E 2375 - 08 - Ultrasonic Testing of Wrought Products
Requirement
Based on size of -6 dB beam
Index direction: Overlap of at least 20% of
the effective beam width size
Scan direction: Scanning speed limited by
detectability of the reference reflectors
Issues for AutoUT
Some zones are not inspected with the
required sensitivity
No formulas provided how to determine an
examination grid
Dx
dx
dy
Dy
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Requirements in Current Standards
Summary
Overlap of
at least 10%
of the
effective
active
element
size
EN 10228-3 SEP1923 IIW Handbook
Overlap of
at least 15%
of the active
element
size
The beam of two adjacent -
6 dB beams have to touch
EN 583-1
No requirement in scan direction (or only by
limitation of scanning speed)
Overlap of the beams however not
considering the volume to be inspected
Unclear:
Effective element size
Transducer width
Some zones are not inspected with the
required sensitivity
No formulas provided how to determine an
examination grid
ASTM E 2375
Overlap of
at least 20%
of the
effective
beam width
size
ASTM A 418
Indexing by
75 % of the
transducer
width
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Required for heavy rotor
forgings
Limited optimization
regarding flaw reflection
Recorded in distinct pattern
Full volume coverage
required
Automated UT Multiple Scans
Required by VGB-R 504 M
Low Sound Attenuation
Limited pulse repetition
rates
Limited inspection speed
Cost of ultrasonic inspection depends directly on examination grid
(both in scanning and index direction)
Motivation Existing standards define examination grids for manual
inspection
Not simply transferable to automated
High inspection duration
Start of development of an Optimal Examination Grid
for the Automated Ultrasonic Inspection
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
DGZfP Committee Ultrasonic Testing
Subcommittee Automated UT
Peter Archinger, GMH Prüftechnik, Nürnberg
Otto Alfred Barbian, Blieskastel
Dr. (USA) Wolfram Deutsch, Karl Deutsch, Wuppertal
Dr. sc. techn. Peter Kreier, Innotest, Eschlikon/CH
Roland Reimann, AREVA NP, Erlangen
Udo Schlengermann, Erftstadt
Herbert Willems, NDT Syst. & Services, Stutensee
Kay Drewitz, Schmiedewerke, Gröditz
Dr.-Ing. Alexander Zimmer, Saarschmiede, Völklingen
Frank W. Bonitz, Westinghouse, Mannheim
Mathias Böwe, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen
Klaus Conrad, Siemens AG Energy, Mülheim
Dr.-Ing. Werner Heinrich, Siemens AG Energy, Berlin
Dr. Johannes Vrana, Siemens AG Energy, München
Dr. Gerhard Brekow, BAM, Berlin
Wolfgang Kappes, Fraunhofer IZFP, Saarbrücken
Hans Rieder, Fraunhofer ITWM, Kaiserslautern
UT System Manufacturers
Forging Manufacturers (Users)
OEM
Research Institutes
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination
Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Longitudinal section through
adjacent beams
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
B: At the end of the near field
C: At 3.5 times near field
Longitudinal Section
A: Directly at the probe
Horizontal Section
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Definition of Rn
2
2
2
2
1
y
y
x
x
nD
d
D
d
R
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
Rn= 1 Gapless (at least single sampling)
dx
dy
Dx
Dy
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Definition of Rn
2
2
2
2
1
y
y
x
x
nD
d
D
d
R
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
Rn= 2 At least double sampling
dx
dy
Dx
Dy
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Definition of RnRn= 0,5 Beams touching
2
2
2
2
1
y
y
x
x
nD
d
D
d
R
Rn= 1 - Gapless
Rn= 2 Double Sampling Rn= 4 Quadruple Sampling
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Overlap:
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination
Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
4
y
y
x
x
dd
D
d
D
R
Definition of an Examination Grid
Average Grid Rating Rd
Definition of Rd
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
Area of -6 dB beam
Rd= ----------------------------
Area of ex. grid
Example: Rd= 1
-6 dB beam
dx
dy
Dx
Dy
Examintion
Grid
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Average Grid Rating Rd
Definition of RdRn= 1; Rd≈ 1.81
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
4
y
y
x
x
dd
D
d
D
R
Rn= 1; Rd≈ 1.57
Optimized
Examination Grid
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
4
y
y
x
x
dd
D
d
D
R
Definition of an Examination Grid
Average Grid Rating Rd
Definition of Rd
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
Optimized examination grid in the case of:
 
n
x
xR
D
d
2
 
n
y
yR
D
d
2
Optimized Examination Grid
and
Optimizing the Examination Grid
durchschnittliche Rastergüte Rd
0,00
1,00
2,00
3,00
4,00
5,00
6,00
7,00
8,00
9,00
10,00
0,00 0,10 0,20 0,30 0,40 0,50 0,60 0,70 0,80 0,90 1,00
dx/Dx
durchschnittliche Rastergüte Rd
Average Grid Rating Rd
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Longitudinal section through
adjacent beams
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
B: At the end of the near field
C: At 3.5 times near field
Longitudinal Section
A: Directly at the probe
Horizontal Section
Grid Rating
2
2
2
2
1
y
y
x
x
nD
d
D
d
R
4
y
y
x
x
dd
D
d
D
R
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle Basic Situation
Normal Straight Beam Probe on a Plane Surface
 
2 tanDs
 
6
2
x
D FB
6
2
y
D FL
Dual Element Probe on a Plane Surface
dx: Increment in scan direction
dy: Distance between two adjacent laps in index direction
Dx, Dy: Dimensions of the ultrasonic beam
s: Soundpath
FB6, FL6: Focal Width & Length
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Different scans required
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
axial
radial radial / axial radial /
tangential radial /
tangential
radial
axial /
tangential
axial/
radial
axial/
radial
Scans
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
Situation
Plane Convex Concave
Normal
Dual Element
Angle
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Probe moved on the surface of the component
Examination grid dxan dyestablished at the surface
Beam changes within the part
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Angle Probe on a Plane Surface
Dx
s
α
φ
φ
For the calculation of the
examination grid the
projection of the beam to
the surface is necessary
 
 
2cos2cos 2sincos2
's
Dx
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Probe moved on the surface of the component
Examination grid dxan dyestablished at the surface
Beam changes within the part
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Angle Probe on a Plane Surface
Dx
s
α
φ
φ
 
 
2cos2cos 2sincos2
's
Dx
 
2 tan
y
Ds
 
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
Situation
Plane Convex Concave
Normal
Dual Element
Angle
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Normal Straight Beam Probe on Convex Surface
 
2 tanDs
 
6
2
x
D FB
6
2
y
D FL
Dual Element Probe on Convex Surface
11
1
' arcsin sin( )
2 180
xD
DD
Ds



 



 


1
1
'2
x
xDD
DDs

Corrected by:
 
2 tan
y
Ds
 
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
E.g. from the outer diameter surface D1
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Angle Probe on a Convex Surface
D‘+
D1
D‘-
 
1 1 1
22
11
1
1
1
22
' arcsin sin( ) arcsin sin( ) 2 180 2
with ( 2) 2 ( 2) cos( )
2sin( ) for 0
and 2sin for 0
2sin for 0
xD D D
Drr
r s D s D
D
rD
D
   
 

 

 
 

 
 

 



1
1
' in the case / 2 cos( )
and ' in the case
wit
/ 2 cos( )
hD s D
D s D


 
2 tan
y
Ds
 
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
Situation
Plane Convex Concave
Normal
Dual Element
Angle
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Normal Straight Beam Probe on Concave Surface
6
2
x
D FB
6
2
y
D FL
Dual Element Probe on Concave Surface
Corrected by:
 
2 tan
y
Ds
 
22
2
' arcsin sin( )
2 180
xD
DD
Ds



 



 


 
2
2
'2
x
xDD
DDs

ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
E.g. from the inner diameter surface D2
Definition of an Examination Grid
How to calculate the sound bundle
Angle Probe on a Concave Surface
 
2 tan
y
Ds
 
 
2 2 2
22
22
22
' arcsin sin( ) arcsin sin( ) 2 180 2
with ( 2) 2 ( 2) cos( )
xD D D
Drr
r s D s D
   

 
 

 
 

 
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Definition of an Examination Grid
Situation
Situation
Plane Convex Concave
Normal
Dual Element
Angle
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the
Examination Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
For each scan
Normalized Grid Rating Rn (gapless recommended)
Examination zone
Minimum soundpath s1
Maximum soundpath s2
Determination of the Examination Grid
Necessary Specifications
Determination of Examination Grid
Calculation of the projection of the sound bundle dimensions both for s1and s2
s1 : Dx1, Dy1
s2 : Dx2, Dy2
Calculation of the optimized examination grid both for s1and s2considering the specified
normalized examination grid rating Rn
s1 : dx1, dy1
s2 : dx2, dy2
Selection of the actually used examination grid dxand dy
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Calculation of the projection of the sound bundle dimensions both for s1and s2
s1 : Dx1, Dy1
s2 : Dx2, Dy2
Calculation of the optimized examination grid both for s1and s2considering the specified
normalized examination grid rating Rn
s1 : dx1, dy1
s2 : dx2, dy2
Selection of the actually used examination grid dxand dy
Determination of the Examination Grid
Determination of Examination Grid
Check of Examination Grid
OK if both selected values are not bigger than the calculated values
dxvs. dx1, dx2
dyvs. dy1, dy2
Otherwise needs to be tested by calculating Rn using dxand dyfor both Dx1, Dy1 and Dx2, Dy2
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Scan s1s2D‘x1 D‘x2 Dy1 Dy2 Rndx1 dx2 dy1 dy2 dxdyRn1 Rn2
(mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm)
Faces, axial, straight 100 300 12.9 38.8 12.9 38.8 1 9.1 27.4 9.1 27.4 9 9 1.03 9.3
Faces, axial/tang., 45° 100 424 13.4 40.1 6.6 19.9 1 9.5 40.1 4.7 19.9 9 4.5 1.09 9.8
OD, radial, straight 120 600 20.4 393 15.5 77.6 1 13.1 280 11.0 55 13 10.5 1.05 52
OD, radial, straight,
dual-element, 5120 514 1 3.6 9.9 3.5 10 1.02
OD, radial/tang., 14° 120 728 21.3 - 15.5 - 2 9.6 - 7.8 - 9.5 7.5 2.1 -
OD, radial/tang., 45° 350 1061 161 141 24 70 1 114 100 16.4 50 100 17 1.09 1.79
D1= 1500 mm, D2= 300 mm, L = 300 mm
°
Determination of the Examination Grid
Example
Disc
Examination Grid
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Scan s1s2D‘x1 D‘x2 Dy1 Dy2 Rndx1 dx2 dy1 dy2 dxdyRn1 Rn2
(mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm) (mm)
Faces, axial, straight 100 300 12.9 38.8 12.9 38.8 1 9.1 27.4 9.1 27.4 9 9 1.03 9.3
Faces, axial/tang., 45° 100 424 13.4 40.1 6.6 19.9 1 9.5 40.1 4.7 19.9 9 4.5 1.09 9.8
OD, radial, straight 120 600 20.4 393 15.5 77.6 1 13.1 280 11.0 55 13 10.5 1.05 52
OD, radial, straight,
dual-element, 5120 514 1 3.6 9.9 3.5 10 1.02
OD, radial/tang., 14° 120 728 21.3 - 15.5 - 2 9.6 - 7.8 - 9.5 7.5 2.1 -
OD, radial/tang., 45° 120 1061 28 141 10 70 1 19.9 100 7.1 50 20 7 1.0 33
D1= 1500 mm, D2= 300 mm, L = 300 mm
°
Determination of the Examination Grid
Example
Disc
Examination Grid
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Introduction & Motivation
Requirements in Current
Standards
Definition of an Examination Grid
Normalized Grid Rating Rn
Average Grid Rating Rd
Determination of the Ultrasonic
Beam Dimensions
Determination of the Examination
Grid
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Current standards
Not sufficient for the determination of an examination grid for automated UT
New DGZfP Standard
Harmonizes the calculation of the examination grid
Defines
Normalized Grid Rating
Average Grid Rating
How to calculate the UT beam dimensions
Optimizes the inspection speed
Can be adopted to other applications
Determination of an Optimal Examination Grid for the Automated
Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings
Summary
ASNT Annual Conference 2013 Dr. Johannes Vrana
Thanks for paying
attention to all the
formulas
 
1 1 1
22
11
1
1
1
22
' arcsin sin( ) arcsin sin( ) 2 180 2
with ( 2) 2 ( 2) cos( )
2sin( ) for 0
and 2sin for 0
2sin for 0
xD D D
Drr
r s D s D
D
rD
D
   
 

 

 
 

 
 

 



1
1
' in the case /2 cos( )
and ' in the case
wit
/ 2 cos( )
hD s D
D s D


2
2
2
2
1
y
y
x
x
nD
d
D
d
R
4
y
y
x
x
dd
D
d
D
R
 
 
2cos2cos 2sincos2
's
Dx
11
1
' arcsin sin( )
2 180
xD
DD
Ds



 



 


1
1
'2
x
xDD
DDs

... In the current version of the demonstrator, the data is only recorded if it passes the coupling detection test, the proximity test and the collision detection test. In addition to its original function of limiting the data points per sensor position, we want to use the proximity test as a form of an examination grid [29]. Therefore, the threshold needs to be adjusted to the sensor resolution. ...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we present an approach where ultrasonic testing data (UT) is linked with its spatial coordinates and direction vector to the examined specimen. Doing so, the processed nondestructive testing (NDT) results can be visualized directly on the sample in real-time using augmented or virtual reality. To enable the link between NDT data and physical object, a 3D-tracking system is used. Spatial coordinates and NDT sensor data are stored together. For visualization, texture mapping was applied on a 3D model. The testing process consists of data recording, processing and visualization. All three steps are performed in real-time. The data is recorded by an UT-USB interface, processed on a PC workstation and displayed using a Mixed-Reality-system (MR). Our system allows real-time 3D visualization of ultrasonic NDT data, which is directly drawn into the virtual representation. Therefore, the possibility arises to assist the operator during the manual testing process. This new approach results in a much more intuitive testing process and a data set optimally prepared to be saved in a digital twin environment. The size of the samples is not limited to a laboratory scale, but also works for larger objects, e.g. a helicopter fuselage. Our approach is inspired by concepts of NDE 4.0 to create a new kind of smart inspection systems.
... In der Regel wird bei einer automatisierten Prüfung von zylindrischen Bauteilen einerseits das Bauteil gedreht und andererseits der Prüfkopf entlang der radialen oder axialen Achse verschoben. Auf Grund der gepulsten Prüfung werden die Daten in einem Raster aufgenommen -dem Prüfraster [7,8]. An jedem Punkt des Rasters wird das Zeitsignal aufgenommen (reflektierte Amplitude über der Zeit), das als A, B, C, … Bild dargestellt werden kann. ...
Article
Full-text available
Große Rotor-Schmiedeteile, die in der Regel eines der kritischsten Bauteile in landgestützten Turbinen und Generatoren für die Energieerzeugung darstellen, setzen für eine ausreichende Lebensdauer eine aufwändige volumetrische Prüfung voraus. Diese wird für gewöhnlich manuell oder automatisiert mit Ultraschall durchgeführt. Durch neue Anforderungen, Designs und Materialien wird eine empfindlichere Prüfung notwendig. Dies kann durch die Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT), auch Ultraschall Computertomographie genannt, erreicht werden. SAFT geht auf das Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) zurück und wurde von mehreren Universitäten weiterentwickelt. Eine Einführung von SAFT in die Serienfertigung großer Schmiedeteile wurde durch die Einführung des von Siemens entwickelten Quantitative-SAFT, auch AVG- oder DGS-SAFT genannt, möglich, das eine Beurteilung eines jeden Voxels in Einheiten eines Ersatzreflektors erlaubt, und durch eine Beschleunigung, die die Rekonstruktion des kompletten Volumens eines großen Schmiedebauteils erlaubt. In dieser Veröffentlichung wird von den Erfahrungen berichtet, die bei der Einführung der SAFT-Prüfung in die Serienfertigung gewonnen werden konnten. Dabei werden die Herausforderungen für Level 2/3-Prüfer diskutiert, wie z. B. die volumenkorrigierte Anzeige der Ergebnisse, der Umgang mit großen Datenmengen, die Fokussierung von Anzeigen, die Amplitudendarstellung in Einheiten eines Ersatzreflektors und der Umgang mit der Software. Des Weiteren wird dargestellt, wie Anzeigen durch SAFT dargestellt werden, wie bei Quantitative-SAFT die Nachweisgrenze bestimmt werden kann und welche Artefakte bei der Serienprüfung mit SAFT auftreten können.
... In der Regel wird bei einer automatisierten Prüfung von zylindrischen Bauteilen einerseits das Bauteil gedreht und andererseits der Prüfkopf entlang der radialen oder axialen Achse verschoben. Auf Grund der gepulsten Prüfung werden die Daten in einem Raster aufgenommen -dem Prüfraster [5,6]. An jedem Punkt des Rasters wird das Zeitsignal aufgenommen (reflektierte Amplitude über der Zeit), das als A, B, C, … Bild dargestellt werden kann. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Große Rotor-Schmiedeteile, die üblicherweise eine der kritischsten Bauteile in landgestützten Turbinen und Generatoren für die Energieerzeugung darstellen, setzen für eine ausreichende Lebensdauer eine aufwändige volumetrische Prüfung voraus. Diese wird üblicherweise manuell oder automatisiert mit Ultraschall durchgeführt. Durch neue Anforderungen, Designs und Materialien wird eine sensitivere Prüfung notwendig. Dies kann durch die Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT), auch Ultraschall Computertomographie genannt, erreicht werden. SAFT geht auf Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) zurück und wurde von mehreren Universitäten weiterentwickelt. Aber erst durch die Einführung des von Siemens entwickelten Quantitative SAFT, auch DGS SAFT genannt, das eine Beurteilung eines jeden Voxels in Einheiten eines Ersatzreflektors erlaubt, und durch eine Beschleunigung, die die Rekonstruktion des kompletten Volumens eines großen Schmiedebauteils erlaubt, wurde eine Einführung von SAFT in die Serienfertigung großer Schmiedeteile möglich. In dieser Veröffentlichung berichten wir von den Erfahrungen, die bei der Einführung der SAFT Prüfung in die Serienfertigung gewonnen werden konnten. Dabei werden die Herausforderungen für Level 2/3-Prüfer diskutiert, wie z.B. die volumenkorrigierte Anzeige der Ergebnisse, der Umgang mit großen Datenmengen, die Fokussierung von Anzeigen und die direkte Anzeige der Amplituden in Einheiten eines Ersatzreflektors. Des Weiteren wird dargestellt, wie Anzeigen durch SAFT dargestellt werden, wie bei Quantitative SAFT die Nachweisgrenze bestimmt werden kann und welche Artefakte bei der Serienprüfung mit SAFT auftreten können. Diese Arbeit wurde mit dem DGZfP Anwenderpreis 2019 ausgezeichnet.
... Typically, when using automated ultrasonic inspection systems, the component is rotated continuously (scan direction) and the probe holder is indexed along the radial or axial axis (index direction). Due to a certain pulse repetition rate the data is recorded in a certain grid -also called the scanning grid [5,6]. At each point of the grid the time signal (reflected amplitude over time) is recorded. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Forgings, being usually one of the most critical components especially in power generation machinery, require intensive volumetric inspection to guarantee a sufficient lifetime. This is usually accomplished by manual or automated ultrasonic testing. We are reporting about a game changer in ultrasonic testing: Ultrasonic Computed Tomography uses analytics (i.e. a mathematical algorithm) to reconstruct the volume (In fact it uses a linearized diffraction tomographic approach for the solution of the inverse problem). This does not only allow to display indications spatially and visually correct in the 3D volume, but also improves the signal to noise ratio significantly, allowing an increase of sensitivity by up to an order of magnitude. The method is based on the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). The applied software is a brand-new implementation of SAFT with a strong focus for a large scale industrial application: the complete 2D as well as 3D reconstruction of ultrasonic inspections of heavy rotor forgings. This paper shows the working principle of the method along with the first results and computation times. Ultrasonic Computed Tomography was also awarded by the Werner von Siemens Award as one of the Top 15 ingenuity programs.
Book
Der durch zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren geleistete Beitrag zur Qualitätssicherung befindet sich im Spannungsfeld zwischen zusätzlichen Kosten bei Herstellung und Betrieb und der erzielbaren Zuverlässigkeit in der Qualitätsaussage. Die Prüfverfahren müssen daher angesichts eines in den letzten Jahren steigenden Kosten und Zeitdrucks im Sinne der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit nicht nur schneller und preisgünstiger, sondern gleichzeitig auch noch zuverlässiger werden. Dieser Hintergrund bringt es mit sich, dass auch bestehende ZfP-Normen und -Regelwerke in der Folge dieses Trends einer Anpassung und exakteren Beschreibung der Prüftechnik bedürfen. Auch für große Schmiedestücke, die beispielsweise für Turbinen- und Generatorrotoren im Energiemaschinenbau eingesetzt werden, sind in den vergangenen Jahren die Qualitätsanforderungen stetig angestiegen. Hierdurch ist ein beständig wachsender Anteil an großvolumigen Schmiedestücken zu verzeichnen, die mittels Ultraschall automatisiert zu prüfen sind. Bei der automatisierten Ultraschallprüfung derart großer Komponenten kommt dem Prüfraster - zusammengesetzt aus dem Schussabstand und dem Spurversatz - gleich doppelte Bedeutung zu. Ein zu grobmaschig definiertes Prüfraster setzt die Auffindwahrscheinlichkeit herab, während zu dicht angelegte Prüfpunkte die ohnehin sehr hohe Prüfzeit großvolumiger Komponenten erhöhen. Die oft sehr geringe Schallschwächung verursacht Phantomechos mit signifi kant hohen Amplituden. Deshalb sind sehr niedrige Impulsfolgefrequenzen erforderlich, die die Prüfzeit zusätzlich verlängern. Die Optimierung des Prüfrasters minimiert die Prüfzeit und damit auch die Prüfkosten. In den zurzeit gültigen Regelwerken findet man jedoch verschiedene Anweisungen zur Festlegung eines Prüfrasters, die teilweise auf zu stark vereinfachten Betrachtungen beruhen, nicht eindeutig oder sogar für die automatisierte Prüfung gänzlich ungeeignet sind. Dadurch können Prüflücken entstehen, also Bereiche, die nicht mit der geforderten Empfindlichkeit geprüft werden. Bei einer exakteren Betrachtung muss z.B. die geometrische Charakteristik von Schallfeldern - insbesondere der sich ändernde Schallbündeldurchmesser in Einschallrichtung - einbezogen werden. Ferner stellen Schallbündel keine physikalisch scharf abgegrenzten Gebiete dar, sondern besitzen einen in lateraler Richtung kontinuierlichen Schalldruckabfall. Die vorliegende Richtlinie beschreibt eine mathematisch unterlegte Vorgehensweise zur Festlegung eines optimalen Prüfrasters zur vollständigen (100 %) Volumenprüfung großer Schmiedestücke unter Berücksichtigung der Schallbündelgeometrie der jeweils eingesetzten Prüfköpfe. Die Richtlinie berücksichtigt neben der Einschallung über ebene Flächen (z.B. die Stirnflächen) auch die Senkrecht- und Winkeleinschallung für konvex und konkav gekrümmte Oberflächen (z.B. Mantelfläche und Bohrung). Dem Anwender wird hierdurch ein Leitfaden zur Verfügung gestellt, der ihn dabei unterstützt, die Prüfzeit zu optimieren, die Prüfabdeckung sicherzustellen und damit die Prüfzuverlässigkeit zu verbessern.
Book
Der durch zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren geleistete Beitrag zur Qualitätssicherung befindet sich im Spannungsfeld zwischen zusätzlichen Kosten bei Herstellung und Betrieb und der erzielbaren Zuverlässigkeit in der Qualitätsaussage. Die Prüfverfahren müssen daher angesichts eines in den letzten Jahren steigenden Kosten und Zeitdrucks im Sinne der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit nicht nur schneller und preisgünstiger, sondern gleichzeitig auch noch zuverlässiger werden. Dieser Hintergrund bringt es mit sich, dass auch bestehende ZfP-Normen und -Regelwerke in der Folge dieses Trends einer Anpassung und exakteren Beschreibung der Prüftechnik bedürfen. Auch für große Schmiedestücke, die beispielsweise für Turbinen- und Generatorrotoren im Energiemaschinenbau eingesetzt werden, sind in den vergangenen Jahren die Qualitätsanforderungen stetig angestiegen. Hierdurch ist ein beständig wachsender Anteil an großvolumigen Schmiedestücken zu verzeichnen, die mittels Ultraschall automatisiert zu prüfen sind. Bei der automatisierten Ultraschallprüfung derart großer Komponenten kommt dem Prüfraster - zusammengesetzt aus dem Schussabstand und dem Spurversatz - gleich doppelte Bedeutung zu. Ein zu grobmaschig definiertes Prüfraster setzt die Auffindwahrscheinlichkeit herab, während zu dicht angelegte Prüfpunkte die ohnehin sehr hohe Prüfzeit großvolumiger Komponenten erhöhen. Die oft sehr geringe Schallschwächung verursacht Phantomechos mit signifi kant hohen Amplituden. Deshalb sind sehr niedrige Impulsfolgefrequenzen erforderlich, die die Prüfzeit zusätzlich verlängern. Die Optimierung des Prüfrasters minimiert die Prüfzeit und damit auch die Prüfkosten. In den zurzeit gültigen Regelwerken findet man jedoch verschiedene Anweisungen zur Festlegung eines Prüfrasters, die teilweise auf zu stark vereinfachten Betrachtungen beruhen, nicht eindeutig oder sogar für die automatisierte Prüfung gänzlich ungeeignet sind. Dadurch können Prüflücken entstehen, also Bereiche, die nicht mit der geforderten Empfindlichkeit geprüft werden. Bei einer exakteren Betrachtung muss z.B. die geometrische Charakteristik von Schallfeldern - insbesondere der sich ändernde Schallbündeldurchmesser in Einschallrichtung - einbezogen werden. Ferner stellen Schallbündel keine physikalisch scharf abgegrenzten Gebiete dar, sondern besitzen einen in lateraler Richtung kontinuierlichen Schalldruckabfall. Die vorliegende Richtlinie beschreibt eine mathematisch unterlegte Vorgehensweise zur Festlegung eines optimalen Prüfrasters zur vollständigen (100 %) Volumenprüfung großer Schmiedestücke unter Berücksichtigung der Schallbündelgeometrie der jeweils eingesetzten Prüfköpfe. Die Richtlinie berücksichtigt neben der Einschallung über ebene Flächen (z.B. die Stirnflächen) auch die Senkrecht- und Winkeleinschallung für konvex und konkav gekrümmte Oberflächen (z.B. Mantelfläche und Bohrung). Dem Anwender wird hierdurch ein Leitfaden zur Verfügung gestellt, der ihn dabei unterstützt, die Prüfzeit zu optimieren, die Prüfabdeckung sicherzustellen und damit die Prüfzuverlässigkeit zu verbessern.