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Corythucha ciliata (Say) (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Tingidae) – a bug species new to the Polish fauna

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Corythucha ciliata (Say) is recorded for the first time from Poland. Data on its present distribution in Europe is summarized.
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... Recently, they were found in the United Kingdom on Platanus acerifolia and Platanus orientalis imported from Italy (Malumphy and Reid, 2006). They were also found in Belgium (Aukema et al., 2007), Holland (Aukema and Hermes, 2009) and Poland (Lis, 2009). At the same time, they were found in Turkey (Mutun, 2009), China (Streito, 2006), Korea (Chung et al., 1996), Japan (Tokihiro et al., 2003), Chile (Prado, 1990) and Australia (Dominiak et al., 2008). ...
... United Kingdom, Belgium, Holland, Poland, Turkey, China, Korea, Japan, Chile and Australia (Drake and Ruhoff, 1965;Servadei, 1966;Majelski and Balarin, 1972a;Majelski and Balarin 1972b;Tomic and Mihaliovic, 1974;Jasinka and Bozsits 1977;Dioli, 1975;d'Aguilar et al., 1977;Ribes, 1980;Sotres and Vazquez 1981;Mildner, 1983;Hopp, 1984;Josifov, 1990;Tzanakakis, 1988;Protic, 1998;Stehlik, 1997;Kment, 2007;Grosso-Silva and Aguiar, 2007;Voight, 2001;Malumphy and Reid 2006;Aukema et al., 2007;Aukema and Hermes, 2009;Lis, 2009;Mutun, 2009;Streito, 2006;Chung et al., 1996;Tokihiro et al., 2003;Prado, 1990;Dominiak et al., 2008;Halbert and Meeker, 1998;Robinson, 2005;Rabitsch and Kenis, 2010). ...
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The oak lace bug Corythucha arcuata (Say) is an important invasive species that causes severe damage to oak species. It was first identified in Europe in 2000. It was recorded for the first time in Turkey in 2003 in Bolu. The sycamore lace bug Corythucha ciliata (Say) is an invasive species that causes severe damage to sycamore trees. The first time it was reported in Europe was in 1964 in Italy. It was recorded for the first time in Turkey in 2007 in Bolu province. Sixty-seven adult individuals of C. arcuata were collected from Kastamonu in 2013 as well as eight adult individuals of C. ciliata in 2013 and 2014. The present study was completed in 2014 with adult specimens collected from the stem and leaves of Platanus orientalis L., and Quercus spp. trees, located in Kastamonu Central Province and the Çatalzeytin district, and identified in the laboratory. Nymphal skin, egg, adult specimens were observed on the leaves. The damage done by C. ciliata to sycamore trees and by C. arcuata to oak leaves was determined. In this study, the C. ciliata and C. arcuata species were recorded for the first time in Kastamonu.
... İngiltere, İspanya, İsviçre, İtalya, Japonya, Karadağ, Güney Kore, Macaristan, Polonya, Portekiz, Rusya, Sırbistan, Slovakya, Slovenya, Türkiye, Yunanistan (Mildner, 1983;Hopp, 1984;Josifov, 1990;Tzanakakis, 1988;Protić, 1998;Stehlík, 1997;Voight, 2001;Tokihiro ve ark., 2003;Streito, 2006;Kment, 2007;Grosso-Silva ve Aguiar, 2007;Lis, 2009;Mutun, 2009;Dominiak ve ark., 2008). ...
Chapter
Fungal and bacterial diseases are the major constraint on cabbage production in Turkey and worldwide. The prevalence of disease problems was not surveyed on cabbage in Turkey. This lack of information about the potential threat of cabbage diseases in Niğde province, a major producer of Turkey, provided the impetus for this study. In this chapter, we describe major diseases or disorders of cabbage monitored in 300 fields at more than 30 sites across Niğde in 2017-2018. According to the results obtained, black rot disease caused by X. campestris pv. campestris was the most common and important bacterial disease in the cabbage production areas of Niğde province. Blackleg caused by Leptosphaeria maculans was the predominant fungal disease limiting production but, with the increased intensification of production, head rots and other sporadic or minor diseases monitored may cause quantitative and qualitative losses and reduce the shelf life of cabbage. Microscopic examination of fungal cultures obtained from collected samples and pathogenicity tests confirmed Alternaria brassicae (15 isolates), A. brassicicola (34 isolates), and A. japonica (8 isolates) as causal agents for Alternaria leaf spot, Leptosphaeria maculans (36 isolates) for blackleg, Hyaloperonospora parasitica for downy mildew (10 isolate), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (20 isolates) for white or head rot, and Rhizoctonia solani (15 isolates) for Rhizoctonia head rot or foliar blight disease. Control strategies to minimize major diseases (black rot and black leg) are urgently required.
... Günümüzde batıda Portekiz ve doğuda Rusya dahil Avrupa'nın büyük kısmına dağılmıştır (Kment, 2007; Grosso-Silva ve Aguiar 2007; Voight, 2001). Son zamanlarda Birleşik Krallık, Belçika, Hollanda, Polonya, Türkiye, Çin, Kore, Japonya Şili ve Avusturalya'da bulunmuştur (Malumphy ve Reid, 2006; Aukema ve ark., 2007; Aukema ve Hermes, 2009; Lis, 2009; Mutun, 2009; Streito, 2006; Chung ve ark., 1996; Tokihiro ve ark., 2003; Prado, 1990; Dominiak ve ark., 2008). Çınar dantel böceği Türkiye faunası için ilk kez 2007 yılında Bolu ili Taşkesti ve Abant arasında yapılan bir çalışma ile bildirilmiştir (Mutun, 2009). ...
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Abstract Sycamore lace bug Corythucha ciliata (Say, 1832) is an invasive species causing severe damages in plane trees. First record date of C. ciliata for Europe is 1964 of which native spreading area is North America. It was initially recorded in 2007 in Bolu Province while it was firstly recorded in Kastamonu in 2014. 190 of 761 Platanus orientalis L. trees present in 19 locations determined in centrum of Kastamonu were determined with sampling method. The determined plane trees were examined in different times between September 2014 and January 2015, and it has been aimed to detect the trees invaded by C. ciliata. In September 2014, it wasn't seen any specimen on 122 trees while 1104 adults and 652 nymps were encountered on 68 tree. In October 2014, it wasn't seen any specimen on 139 trees while 552 adults and 110 nymps were encountered. In addition, chlorotic spottings, excretion wastes and eggs have been seen, which are adult and nymph effects in leaf samples taken from these trees. Moreover, trunks of these trees were examined in January 2015, and 63 adults from 41 trees that spend the winter under shell were collected. It was detected that 36% of trees in September, 27% of trees in October and 22% of trees in January used in main artery landscape of Kastamonu centrum has undergone C. ciliata invasion. C. ciliata species being an invasive species for P. orientalis trees having a native spreading in Kastamonu and having a great importance in landscape of its centrum constitutes a severe risk. Key words: Platanus orientalis, Corythucha ciliata, Kastamonu, Sycamore lace bug
... A species of Nearctic origin; the first European record originated in Italy (Servadei 1966), and nowadays the species is very widespread across Europe in the UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Croatia, Slovenia, Serbia, Montenegro, Greece, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria. It has been found in Turkey, in Southern Russia, in Korea, in China, in Japan, in Australia and in Chile (Prado 1990;Goro et al. 2003;Gillespie 2007;Lis 2009;Mutun 2009;Rabitsch 2010b;Tatu & Tăuşan 2011). C. ciliata was found for the first time in Portugal in 1994 (Hoffmann 1996), but the record was omitted in the subsequent papers dealing with the species (Kment 2007) Distribution. ...
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The spread of invasive pests is an important topic in pest control and early detection is crucial for containment of invasive aliens. In this study the results of recent surveys on alien insects of ornamental urban plants in Portugal are reported. Overall, 13 alien species associated with allochthonous ornamental plants were recorded. Seven of these pests are new to the Portuguese fauna: Tinocallis kahawaluokalani (Kirkaldy); Illinoia liriodendri (Monell); Appendiseta robiniae (Gillette) (Hemiptera: Aphididae); Acizzia jamatonica (Kuwayama) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae); Dasineura gleditchiae (Osten Sacken); Obolodiplosis robiniae (Haldeman) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae); and Phytoliriomyza jacarandae Steyskal & Spencer (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Additional distribution data are also provided for other recently introduced alien pests in Portugal: Myzocallis (Lineomyzocallis) walshii (Monell) (Hemiptera: Aphididae); Platycorypha nigrivirga Burckhardt; Glycaspis brimblecombei Moore (Hemiptera: Psyllidae); Calophya schini Tuthill (Hemiptera: Calophyidae); Corythucha ciliata (Say) (Hemiptera: Tingidae); and Lantanophaga pusillidactylus (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pterophoridae). Three species in particular (Illinoia liriodendri, Obolodiplosis robiniae and Phytoliriomyza jacarandae) were not previously found in the Iberian Peninsula. Details on current distribution, host plants and biological remarks are given for each species. Possible origin areas, pathways and impacts are also discussed.
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The sycamore lace bug (Corythucha ciliata Say, 1832) is of North American origin, but after its introduction to Europe (1964), South America (1985), Asia (1995), Australia (2006), and Africa (2014), it became an abundant and widespread pest on plane (Platanus spp.) trees. We analysed a 1356 bp long fragment of the mtDNA (COI gene) of 327 sycamore lace bug individuals from 38 geographic locations from Europe, Asia, and North America. Seventeen haplotypes (17 HTs) were detected. C. ciliata populations from North America exhibited higher haplotype diversity (12 HTs) than populations from Europe (6 HTs), Asia (4 HTs), or Japan (2 HTs). The haplotypes formed two haplogroups separated by at least seven mutation steps. One of these mutation steps includes HTs from North America and Japan. Another includes HTs from North America, Europe, and Asia. Haplotypes from Asia Minor, the Caucasus, and Central Asia are linked to haplotypes from Europe, while haplotypes found in Japan are linked to haplotypes found in North America only. The incorporation of published data from the GenBank into our dataset (altogether 517 individuals from 57 locations, but only 546 bp long fragment of the mtDNA) did not show any structure according to the geographic origin of the individuals.
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Corythucha arcuata, the North American oak lace bug was discovered in Europe in 2000 (in northern Italy) and has spread rapidly in several European countries. However, the species was not reported from Poland, so far. Its potential geographic distribution was modelled using maximum entropy (MaxEnt) in order to predict the regions of Poland where it would have found the best environmental conditions for its further spread.
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In the present study a new Romanian record is given for Corythucha ciliata (Say, 1832) a well-known alien pest species of Platanus spp. Although this species is very common in Europe, it has only once been recorded in Romania until now, in Craiova. Alongside the biology and economic importance of C. ciliata, the damage it produces and pest control methods are emphasized. Rezumat. În studiul de faţă se prezintă o nouă semnalare pentru specia Corythuca ciliata (Say, 1832) în România, dăunător al speciilor de Platanus spp. Deşi larg răspândită în Europa, în România specia a fost semnalată doar la Craiova. Sunt prezentate de asemenea date privind biologia, ecologia şi importanţa economică a speciei C. ciliata, precum şi impactul produs şi metodele de combatere.
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Acetropis longirostris Puton, 1875 (Miridae: Stenodemini) and Oxycarenus (Euoxycarenus) pallens (Herrich- Schaeffer, 1850) (Oxycarenidae) are recorded for the first time from Poland; both species were collected in a mountain meadow in a vicinity of Bystra in the Silesian Beskid Mts. The adult specimen of O. pallens, collected at the end of August, 2013 represents the summer generation of this species. Additionally, a list of all 54 true-bug species recorded from a vicinity of Bystra in the Silesian Beskid Mts is provided.
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In late August 1988, the author noticed the presence of Corythucha ciliata (Say) (Hemiptera: Tingidae) in many plane trees of the following locations of northwestern Greece: 1) City of Kastoria, on 22.VIII.1988, along the coastal road of the city’s peninsula in Lake Orestias. Along this road, trees near the Panaghia Mavriotissa church were heavily infested, while trees further away were less so. Infested trees were also noticed along the quay of the northern end of the city. 2) Zagori, Epirus, on 24. VIII.1988, on the banks of the river Voidomatis, where the river meets the road between the villages Aristi and Papingo. The degree of infestation varied between adjacent trees. 3) Zagori, Epirus, on 25.VIII.1988, the single plane tree in the middle of the square of the village Eptahori. 4) City of Yannina, on 26. VIII. 1988, several single trees in the Kastro section of the city and also trees along the banks of the lake bordering the city. As heavily infested were recorded trees having most of their leaves chlorotic in the largest part of their laminae. On the underside of leaves that could be reached from the ground live adults, exuviae of immature stages and dark sports typical of excrement and of oviposition sites of Tingidae were found. On certain leaves more than 10 live adults per leaf were counted in Kastoria and Yannina. The identity of the species was determined by the author on adult specimens from Kastoria preserved dry and in ethanol. The fact that the infested locations were tens of kilometers apart and at considerably differ ent altitudes, leads to the conclusion that C. ciliata must have crossed the Greek northwest­ern border not less than two years ago. It is suspected that the insect entered Greece by natural spread from neighboring Albania. Examination by the author of plane trees in towns and villages of the Pella and Kilkis prefectures near the Yugoslavian border, showed no infestation. C. ciliata is of nearctic origin. In the northeastern and northwestern United States it is a pest of sycamore, Platanus occidentalis L., which is its preferred host plant, but also feeds on ash, hickory and also on mulberry. In Europe the host plants of preference are Platanus X acerifolia (Afton) Willd. and P. orientalis L., while such other broad-leaved trees as Brussonetia pap•rifera and ash are also reported as able to support the insect. The insect entered Europe and was noted first in Italy in 1964. Its spread was rather rapid, so that by 1986 it had spread to all the regions of Italy. In 1976 chemical control tests against it were re­ported from Hungary. Its presence in Yugoslavia was reported in 1972, in France in 1977, in Spain in 1981, in Switzerland in 1983 and in Austria in 1984. It is considered one of the three most important insects infesting the leaves of plane trees in Italy and generally very destructive. The adult insect is approximately 3 to 3.5 mm long and has reticulate front wings and reticulate expansions of the pronotum. The pronotum is yellowish, largely expanded on the sides which are transparent, and has a median vesicated process. The front wings are subquadrangular and have a proximal vesica which is globular and more or less smoky to­wards its internal margin. Two to three generations per year have been reported in Italy, same as in the northeastern United States. Hibernation takes place in the adult stage, mostly under loose bark at the basal part of the trunk or in other protected places nearby. In spring, the adults move to the young leaves, where they lay their eggs on the under side of the blade where the immature stages feed and develop and the long-lived adults re­main feeding and reproducing. The feeding punctures cause chlorosis which starts from the basal part of the leaf and may expand to almost the whole leaf. On the underside of leaves, where the insect lives in colonies, there are usually numerous small dark spots. Heavily infested species of Platanus, in addition to extensive yellowing, may undergo premature leaf drop. In Italy and especially in urban areas, C. ciliata continues to cause concern because of the weakening of plane trees which predis­poses them to attacks by other enemies. There is no doubt that the spread of C. ciliates in Greece will also be fairly rapid. The authorities should take advantage of the extensive work done in Italy, to further develop effective and ecologically sound control measures. Determining the resistance to the insect of Plalanus stock available in Greece should be among the projects to be encouraged.
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The presence of the "sycamore lacebug", Corythucha ciliata (Say), and a brief description of the insect is reported for Chile. Weekly leaf samples indicated three generetions per year in the study area, that is from south of Santiago to the VII Región.
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In our day, thanks to high-speed transport systems, people are moving living species (intentionally or not) across ecosystems and countless borders. As we know, most introduced species usually do not survive, because they find neither a tolerable environment nor an available ecological niche. Sometimes, successful establishment may also require multiple introductions (Balcom 2004). Of those species that do become established, only a limited number spread and become damaging. Such invasive species are a major threat to our environment because they not only may replace native species (especially beneficial ones) but sometimes they even can change an entire habitat, severely reducing its structure and diversity. Their full effects often are not detected, because the invasion process usually is very long and goes through a series of stages, such as import, release or escape, establishing a population, spreading, becoming a problem, and others (Balcom 2004, Williamson 2006). Moreover, the place of origin of an alien species also plays a role in the process of establishing a population in a new habitat; in Central Europe (i.e., Austria and Switzerland, where the studies were conducted) among the alien intercepted insects, 40% were associated with commodities from Asia, 32% from other European regions, and only 2% from North America (Kenis et al. 2007). Therefore, any new European record of invasive insect species originating from North America is of a great importance, because it helps to document its spreading in a new environment and facilitate preparation for its controlling. One recent introduction from North America to Europe was that of the western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis Heid.). It was originally restricted in its distribution to the western United States, Canada, and Mexico, and is considered a severe pest on conifer seed orchards; it sometimes also causes serious alarm in the autumn, when large numbers of adults suddenly invade houses looking for overwintering sites (cf. Mitchell 2000). In Europe, the species was first established in 1999 in northern Italy, where it was accidentally introduced to different localities (Taylor et al. 2001, Tescari 2001, Villa et al. 2001). Then the species quickly expanded its range towards the west and north of the continent; over a period of eight years it had invaded Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, and Czech Republic to the north, and France to the west (Gogala 2003, Jurc & Jurc 2004, Tescari 2004, Rabitsch & Heiss 2005, Harmat et al. 2006, Kment & Baňař 2007, Moulet 2006, Werner 2006, Dusoulier et al. 2007); in 2003 it was also independently recorded in Spain (Ribes et al. 2004, Ribes & Escol ŕ 2005). In early 2007, it was unexpectedly collected at Weymouth College in England (Malumphy & Reid 2007), and a few months ago it was found also in Belgium in Oostendse (information posted on the 16th of October 2007 to http://www.zwvlkoepel.be/iwg; and Aukema & Libeer 2007). In contrast to all previous records (except that from Spain), because of the place of collecting, the latter two might suggest two independent introductions rather than invasions from southern Europe. Recently, in October 2007, two populations of this species were recorded in the southern part of Poland (Lower Silesia: Wrocław, on a building's window, close to a group of Pinus strobus, 18.10.2007, leg. J. Gubernator - see Photo; Cracow-Wieluń Upland: Miechów near Cracow, on window sill, 10.10.2007, leg. J. Szafarska, groups of Pinus silvestris nearby). These are the first records of this invasive bug in Poland. The available evidence (especially the collecting sites, present area of species distribution, and the speed of spread - see Dusoulier et al. 2007) suggest that L. occidentalis entered Poland from the Czech Republic, where it too was recorded for the first time in 2007 (Kment & Baňař 2007), and where it has quickly spread its range furtherto the north. The species is quite easily distinguished from all other Central European species of the Coreidae, because of its reddish-brown body with a white zig-zag line across the center of the wings, and the characteristic expansions on the hind tibia (see the Photo). In its natural habitat the nymphs and adults spend the summer on pines and other coniferous trees, feeding on green cones and needles, causing a high incidence of conelet abortion and a reduction in the yield and quality (vitality) of seeds. As the weather cools in September, western conifer-seed bugs search for sheltered places to hibernate, and therefore are often seen around homes in the autumn. Its host plants include white pine (Pinus strobus), red pine (Pinus resinosa), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Austrian pine (Pinus nigra), mugo pine (Pinus mugo), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), white spruce (Picea glauca), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), several other conifers, and pistachio (Pistacia vera) (Rice et al. 1985, Blatt 1994, Bates 2000, Mitchell 2000). When we consider the speed of spread of this invasive species (Dusoulier et al. 2007) and the area of its host plants occurrence in Europe, we can ask what happens when this introduced species is successful in its new European habitats. Unfortunately, because L. occidentalis has only recently arrived in the "old continent," only its first records in different countries were usually documented, so far. Nevertheless, we should realize that any new species takes up space and food resources and therefore has some effect on a local ecosystem; the scale of the consequences can depend on the population size the invader reaches, which could lead native species to be displaced to less optimal niches, or to the local extirpation of the native species altogether. For the next few years, more detailed research on the population biology of L. occidentalis in Europe instead of just documentation of new European country records should be emphasized. National Plant Protection Organisations in different European countries should cooperate in conducting a survey of the distribution and population characteristics of this true bug, as was done in the Netherlands and Belgium for the invasive New Zealand wheat bug Nysius huttoni White (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeidae) (Smit et al. 2007). If appropriate measures are not taken, L. occidentalis may indeed spread over all Europe; then we will not only have a beautiful "tropical-like species" to admire (Fig. 1), but a regularly breeding invasive species making changes in our coniferous forest ecosystems.
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This paper reviews the alien (non-native, non-indigenous, exotic) true bug (Heteroptera) species in Europe. Forty-two established alien Heteroptera are recognized, of which 12 species are alien to Europe (originating outside Europe: eight from North America, three from the Eastern Palaearctic, one from New Zealand), 24 species are alien within Europe (translocated within Europe), and six cryptogenic species are of unknown origin. Since 1990 an approximate arrival rate of 7 species per decade has been observed. A recent trend of increased introductions from North America to Europe is suggested. The most important pathway of alien Heteroptera is translocation as contaminants (49 %), usually with ornamental plants, followed by unintentional introduction through natural dispersal (unaided) across political borders within Europe (28 %), and translocation as stowaways within a transport vector (21 %). The taxonomic composition of the alien Heteroptera of Europe is dominated by Miridae (17 species, 40 %), Tingidae (8 species, 19 %), and Anthocoridae (5 species, 12 %), all of which are overrepresented compared to the native European Heteroptera fauna. More than half of the species are phytophagous (24 species, 57 %) and the advantage of trophic specialization in invasion success is discussed. Most species are currently known to occur in the Czech Republic (19 species) and Germany (17 species), followed by Western European countries (Belgium 15 sp., France and United Kingdom 14 sp. each, and Netherlands 13 sp.), resulting in an apparent (north)west-(south)east gradient probably reflecting horticultural tradition in Europe. No unambiguous evidence exists so far for negative ecological or economical impacts, but more research is needed to investigate possible effects. Introductions of alien Heteroptera to and within Europe will increase, and deserve further consideration.
Hémiptères Tingidae Euro-Méditerraneens Faune de France 69
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First British record of Corythucha ciliata (Say), Tingidae
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Note sur quelques espèces envahissantes de Tingidae : Corythucha ciliata (Say
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Un Tingide nearctico comparso in Italia (Corythucha ciliata Say)
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Servadei A. 1966. Un Tingide nearctico comparso in Italia (Corythucha ciliata Say). Bollettino della Societa Entomologica Italiana 96: 94–96.