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Abandonment and Engulfment Issues in Relationship Therapy

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Abstract

Unresolved abandonment and engulfment issues may be activated by space and closeness needs of people in a relationship. Treatment interventions are divided into four categories: blocked development, script decisions, introjections, and communication problems.

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