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Old World Sexism Transplanted “Test of the Sheet”

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When Nick visits the café of his brother-in-law, Lombros, they become embroiled in a heated discussion over who is and who is not genuinely Greek. Nick takes the position that to be a true Greek you must not only have been born and raised in Greece but also speak Greek perfectly. On the other hand, Lombros takes the position that being Greek depends only on how much you love Hellenic culture and thereby what is in your heart. The conversation then turns into the real reason for Nick's visit. He wants to arrange a marriage between their sister-in-law, Penelope, and Yiannos, an older Greek man who owns a thriving restaurant. Yiannos's demand for a virgin bride threatens to doom any possibility of his marrying Penelope, until Lombros's cook, Josephine, saves the day with a fool-proof plan for Penelope to pass the “test of the sheet.”

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... note This story is part of a larger narrative, titled Melting Pot Boils Over. Readers who may be interested in reading other stories in this narrative or discussions about it, should see: Athens, 1996Athens, , 1997Athens, , 2004Athens, , 2005aAthens, , 2005bAthens, , 2005Athens, c, 2006Athens, , 2007Athens, , 2008aAthens, and 2008b references Athens, L. (1996). Greek Americans, "New Greece, " & Greek Orthodoxy. ...
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... That semiotic self is essentially a view of the self where the semiotics of symbols and habits is taken more seriously than it often is in Symbolic Interactionism, Dramaturgy (Goffman 1974) and Peformance Studies. We can apply the theory of the semiotic self to the "pragmatics" of social action Athens (2005Athens ( , 2008. ...
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