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RADAR: An approach for helping students evaluate Internet sources

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RADAR: An approach for helping students evaluate Internet sources

Abstract

The Internet has become an integral part of all aspects of the life of twenty-first-century learners. Yet research shows that students’ ease and familiarity with the mechanics of the medium are not matched by their ability to evaluate electronic sources critically. Both faculty and library professionals are acutely aware of this, and much help is available to students in the form of checklists and guides to evaluating Internet sources. Students still seem to be falling through the cracks, however. The author suggests the adoption of the ‘RADAR’ approach to evaluating Internet sources. Just as a ship’s captain needs electronic radar to navigate safely and efficiently through the ocean, so the information searcher needs a similar scanning device, that is, a critical, mental radar, when exploring the vast sea of information on the Internet. This device can help students develop a critical awareness of the need to establish the Relevance, Authority, Date, Appearance and Reason for writing of each web source that they encounter. Preliminary qualitative research amongst both native and non-native English-speaking college students suggests a positive user response to both the concept and the tool, providing grounds for further empirical investigation.
... In the existing literature, there is a degree of overlap identified among the data quality dimensions and their assessment methods. For instance, Mandalios and Jane [26] used the following assessment criteria to evaluate online sources: purpose, authority and credibility, accuracy and reliability, currency and timeliness and objectivity. In addition, Zhu and Gauch [41] proposed six quality metrics, including currency, availability, information-to-noise ratio, authority, popularity and cohesiveness, for investigating the assessment of online sources. ...
... Online news content contains information on one or more events that occur in the form of paragraphs, media and references of other linked information available electronically to the public [38]. The content of the news article is ensured by means of currency, timeliness, relevance, accuracy and its impact [26]. To analyze the content of the news source, the data quality attributes available in the content are extracted to quantify the data quality score of the content. ...
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Online news sources are popular resources for learning about current health situations and developing event-based surveillance (EBS) systems. However, having access to diverse information originating from multiple sources can misinform stakeholders, eventually leading to false health risks. The existing literature contains several techniques for performing data quality evaluation to minimize the effects of misleading information. However, these methods only rely on the extraction of spatiotemporal information for representing health events. To address this research gap, a score-based technique is proposed to quantify the data quality of online news articles through three assessment measures: 1) news article metadata, 2) content analysis, and 3) epidemiological entity extraction with NLP to weight the contextual information. The results are calculated using classification metrics with two evaluation approaches: 1) a strict approach and 2) a flexible approach. The obtained results show significant enhancement in the data quality by filtering irrelevant news, which can potentially reduce false alert generation in EBS systems.
... it is important to evaluate each source to determine the quality of the information accessible to you. Common evaluation criteria include: purpose and intended audience, authority and credibility, accuracy and reliability, currency and timeliness, and objectivity or bias (Mandalios, 2013;Burkhardt& MacDonald, 2010;Brock University Library, 2021). Each of these criteria will be explained in detail below: ...
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Full-text available
This is a review paper that explored the concepts of information, disinformation and misinformation. The role of social media in facilitating the dissemination of information, disinformation and misinformation was carefully examined. The social media categories include Social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, Linkedin; Media sharing networks such as Instagram, Snapchat, Youtube; Discussion forum such as Reddit, Quora, Digg; Bookmarking & content curation networks including Pinterest, Flipboard; Consumer review networks such as Yelp, Zomato, Tripadvisor; Blogging & publishing networks such as Wordpress, Tumblr, Medium; and Social shopping networks such as Polyvore, Etsy, Fancy. These categories of social media expose their users to solicited and unsolicited unverified information from diverse sources. The paper identified the criteria for siphoning reliable information from misinformation and disinformation on the social media to include: The purpose of the information, the target audience, authority and credibility of the author, accuracy and reliability of the information, currency and timeliness, objectivity or bias of the information; reputation of the publisher or sharer of the information.The paper recommended that social media users should regard information from social media as fake until it has been verified and proven otherwise; Government should prioritize digital literacy education rather than regulating social media; while librarians, communicators and educators should embark on public enlightenment campaign to promote digital literacy as the world moves towards socio-digital immersion.
... Its universality allows and assumes use at all levels of text study. 9 Th e texts for the study were searched with the help of online databases of scientifi c studies and Internet search engines on the basis of keywords combining the designations covid-19, etc., and the relevant potentials, respectively areas of quality of life. For the purposes of the study, those texts that most relevantly represented the knowledge about the eff ects of the pandemic in the given area were selected. ...
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